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How to create your own rubber stamped stationery

Updated on October 9, 2013
Handmade stationery in basket.
Handmade stationery in basket. | Source

Rubber stamping as an art.

Almost 20 years ago, I took my first rubber-stamping class. I remember sitting in the cafeteria-style room with less than 10 other women trying to figure out why a class was needed to learn how to rubber stamp. My previous exposure to rubber stamping was at the library. They had an ink pad with a date stamp at the desk where I would check-out books. The stamp was used to mark the due date of the book.

The world that was opened to me from that one class is unforgettable. Rubber stamping has developed into an opportunity to demonstrate my crafty side of life.

This custom gift basket ensemble makes a great gift idea for friends and family. My first basket was a thank you basket to my piano teacher many years ago. I made hers from an iris rubber stamp. Back then I only had basic markers, not the fancy copics I own today.

Step 1. Have a plan.

Often, plans do not work out as well as we expect. When creating stationery it's important to have an idea of what you want the end result to look like.

  • How do you want to store the stationery when it's finished?
  • Do you want to give it away or keep it as a gift?
  • Will you store it in a box?
  • Do you want to create a variety of pieces and put them in a decorative basket?
  • How much are you planning on creating?
  • What pieces are you going to create?
  • What kind of box would you need if you were going to store it in a box?
  • If you are going to use a basket, do you want a rectangle basket, round basket, etc.?
  • What will you need for decorations?
  • What design do you want on the stationery?
  • Do you have all of the stamps on hand to make the stationery?

Step 2. What supplies do you have on hand?

The next step is determining what you have on hand.

There are many tools rubber stamp artists use in their creations.

First you will have to learn the techniques and styles of rubber stamping.

Then figure out if you need to purchase any supplies. This is important because I've found myself in the middle of a project a few times without the necessary supplies to complete it. Then I either have to stop in the middle of it and run to the store hoping they have it in stock, or I have to order it online which will take a few days to receive. Some places take up to two weeks to deliver.

Before jumping right in to a rubber stamping project, it's good to have basic supplies on hand. See table below for some ideas.

Rubber Stamp Supplies
Heat Gun
Light Table
Ink Pads
Rubber Stamps
Embossing Tool
Embossing Powders
Rubber Stamp Markers
Copic Markers
Colored Pencils
Watercolor Pencils
Cardstock
Evnelopes
Stationery Paper
Rubber Stamp Cleaner
Tray for used Rubber Stamps
Paper Trimmer
Measuring Spoons
You may not need everything listed here.

A few of my own rubber stamp supplies.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Tray of embossing powders I keep in a drawer, along with measuring spoons.Heat Embossing Gun.Rubber Stamp Cleaners and Refill.Brush Markers.I use salt and pepper shakers to shake embossing powder on to my stamped images.Different types of ink pads.
Tray of embossing powders I keep in a drawer, along with measuring spoons.
Tray of embossing powders I keep in a drawer, along with measuring spoons. | Source
Heat Embossing Gun.
Heat Embossing Gun. | Source
Rubber Stamp Cleaners and Refill.
Rubber Stamp Cleaners and Refill. | Source
Brush Markers.
Brush Markers. | Source
I use salt and pepper shakers to shake embossing powder on to my stamped images.
I use salt and pepper shakers to shake embossing powder on to my stamped images. | Source
Different types of ink pads.
Different types of ink pads. | Source
Dry Emboss.
A light box, not shown here, is used to dry emboss images on to a piece of cardstock. For this demonstration, we are using embossing powders with heat.
Tip!
Store ink pads face down for longevity.

Step 3. Different types of inks.

Dye ink. Dries fast, great for paper and cardstock, comes in many colors.

Pigment ink. Takes a while to dry. Can be heat dried with an embossing gun. Can be used with embossing powders. Can be used on glossy surfaces such as vellum, photos, and coated paper. Also can be applied to porous surfaces such as tissue paper and wood. Comes in many colors.

Watermark ink. This ink creates a translucent image. Can be used with embossing powders and heated with heat gun.

Embossing ink. Slow drying ink developed specifically for rubber stamping. This ink is used with embossing powders to create an embossed image with a heat gun.


All of the above inks can be applied directly to a rubber stamp in its entirety.


Brush Markers. Brush markers are special markers designed for rubber stamps. They are to be applied directly to the rubber stamp on the areas you choose. Unlike ink pads which are large and usually cover the entire stamp, the brush marker has a small tip for applying color to the areas on the stamp that you want to create a design with on paper.


This old cookie sheet was repurposed as a tray for used rubber stamps while they wait to be cleaned.
This old cookie sheet was repurposed as a tray for used rubber stamps while they wait to be cleaned. | Source

Tip!

When using your embossing powders, use a piece of scrap cardstock under the embossed object. When you are done powdering, shake off the excess powder on to the scrap piece, and the remainder can now be placed back in to the powder container. This eliminates waste and saves money on supplies.

Measuring Spoons
Keep 1/8 and 1/4 size spoons on hand in plastic or stainless for measuring powders.

Step 4. Organizing embossing powders.

When you are creating stationery with embossed rubber stamped designs, you may want to incorporate colored embossing powder.

Especially while making Christmas cards, I go through a lot of red and green embossing powders. I also use a lot of silver and gold in my designs.

Therefore, to organize embossing powders, I purchased salt and pepper shakers. They have removable tops. Just empty the embossing powders in the shakers and pour out what you need when you stamp your image.

This has become a very effective way to organize the many colors of embossing powders I used in my designs. Because when I'm done with the embossing process, there is always powder leftover that I like to save and not throw away. It's too expensive to waste.

Some of the embossing powders already come in jars with large openings. For those powders, I keep them in the original containers. For other jars with smaller openings, once I open them, I transfer the powder to the shakers for future use.

Envelopes and cardstock cards
Envelopes and cardstock cards | Source

Step 5. Set up your work area.

I have an art studio with an antique table in the center of the room. This allows me to create large scale projects. I also have a desk to the side for rubber stamping.

It's good to place wax paper down in front of you no matter where you work for easy clean up.

  1. Make sure your work space is clean. Clear off the table or counter where you will be working. Dust the area.
  2. Lay down a piece of wax paper over your work surface. This will keep your work area separate from ink pads that you do not want to accidentally stain your papers with.
  3. Have your papers pre-cut and ready to stamp. This includes cardstock for greeting cards and paper for stationery.
  4. Keep your inks in one place off to the side, powders and heat gun nearby.
  5. Plug in your heat gun and turn it on once until it gets hot. Then turn it off. This way when you go to place your embossed image under the gun and turn it on, it will melt the powder with less effort than waiting for it to heat up all over again and possibly blow around some of the loose powder.


I just happened to have two similar dragonfly stamps.
I just happened to have two similar dragonfly stamps. | Source

Tip!

When embossing cards with a heat gun, hold the card with a clothes pin or tweezers. Something that will not make an indent on your cardstock. The reason for this is so that you don't accidentally burn yourself with the heat gun and can emboss the image thoroughly without moving the card around.

Step 6. Rubber Stamp your Designs.

Rubber stamp your images.

Start with a clean rubber stamp.

Make sure you apply enough even pressure when pressing the stamp on to the cardstock or paper to make a clean impression. You can use a ruler or guestimate the center of your cards for placing the image.

Here is when you decide to use brush markers or ink pads. The possibilities are endless. It's a matter of preference and how you want your images to appear as they are stamped on the paper.

If you are using dye ink, you may heat the ink until it is dry. Otherwise, it is recommended to wait until the ink has air dried before applying marker or pencil color. If you don't wait, you may smear the dye ink in to the stamped image.

(Also, when the ink isn't dry and marker is applied, the ink will run in to the marker surface creating a streaked color when applied. This is not desirable. It may even ruin the image all together.)

Otherwise, use the heat gun to melt the embossing powder.

Set your design aside away from your work station, especially ink pads.


Click thumbnail to view full-size
Card on the right is a stamped image from dye ink.  Card on the left is heat embossed with silver powder.Using ink pads to ink stamp.Embossing image with clear embossing ink.Using embossing powder to cover embossed image.Using a heat gun to melt the embossing powder.Embossed image after powder is melted.
Card on the right is a stamped image from dye ink.  Card on the left is heat embossed with silver powder.
Card on the right is a stamped image from dye ink. Card on the left is heat embossed with silver powder. | Source
Using ink pads to ink stamp.
Using ink pads to ink stamp. | Source
Embossing image with clear embossing ink.
Embossing image with clear embossing ink. | Source
Using embossing powder to cover embossed image.
Using embossing powder to cover embossed image. | Source
Using a heat gun to melt the embossing powder.
Using a heat gun to melt the embossing powder. | Source
Embossed image after powder is melted.
Embossed image after powder is melted. | Source

Tip!

To create a watercolor image, color on one side of a stamped image on cardstock with copic markers. Using bold, strong colors, flip the card over the card and see how the marker soaked through. Use this as a decorative card topper or create a gift tag by covering the colored side with another piece of cardstock.

See photo below under bonus!

Step 7. Color in the images.

There are many ways you can color in an image.

Copic markers, watercolor pencils, colored pencils, regular markers, etc. The possibilities are endless.

You can also decorate your designs with glitter glue and glaze.

For the embossed card in this project, I used copic markers. For the second card that was rubber stamped with purple ink, I used chalk to color in the image of the dragonfly. When using chalk, you can use makeup brushes as well as cosmetic wedges to apply the chalk.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Using Copic markers to color in the embossed image.Coloring with Copic.Colored embossed image.Using chalk to color stamped image.Chalk can be applied with make-up brushes and foam wedges.Colored images.
Using Copic markers to color in the embossed image.
Using Copic markers to color in the embossed image. | Source
Coloring with Copic.
Coloring with Copic. | Source
Colored embossed image.
Colored embossed image. | Source
Using chalk to color stamped image.
Using chalk to color stamped image. | Source
Chalk can be applied with make-up brushes and foam wedges.
Chalk can be applied with make-up brushes and foam wedges. | Source
Colored images.
Colored images. | Source
Using a box template created out of poster board.
Using a box template created out of poster board. | Source

Step 8. Creating a set of stationery.

Decide how many items you want in each set.

For example, if you are creating a set of notecards, decide how many you want in the set. This also means you need to decide how you want the notecards packaged. Do you want them in a box? Do you want them loose in a basket?

Also, decide if you are going to create pieces of matching stationery with the same stamp or a smaller one.

I used to create a lot of unique, custom stationery sets for offices. For example, someone preferred a flower stamp on a set of note cards, but their first initial on paper so they could write notes to go in to the notecard.

These are just a few ideas. Your can create practically any scenario from imagination.

Tip!

To save money, I have found sets of boxed wedding card kits in plain white or ivory on clearance. Sometimes those cost less than a box of card envelopes and you get twice as many in a set.

Step 9. Don't forget envelopes.

Fortunately, pre-made envelopes come in all sizes.

For note cards, you can use card size envelopes. For decorative paper, you can find a business size envelope. You can also stretch your imagination and decorate the envelope as well. Who wouldn't want a set of matching stationery complete with envelopes? If you choose to decorate your envelope, here's a suggestion for picking a matching rubber stamp.

Of course you can use the same stamp you used for the greeting card.

If you want to get more creative, find a different stamp in the theme in which you are working. For example, insects. For the greeting cards here today, I chose dragonflies. I happened to have another stamp with an assortment of insects and one smaller dragonfly. I used that with a brush marker, only coloring the dragonfly I wanted to stamp on the envelope, and a tiny image appeared on the envelope.

Here are some suggestions about where to purchase envelopes (in no particular order):

  • Walmart
  • Target
  • Office Supply Stores
  • eBay
  • Amazon
  • Other online retailers


Click thumbnail to view full-size
Choosing a stamp for the envelope.Coloring on stamp with brush marker.Stamping image on corner of envelope.Stamped envelope.
Choosing a stamp for the envelope.
Choosing a stamp for the envelope. | Source
Coloring on stamp with brush marker.
Coloring on stamp with brush marker. | Source
Stamping image on corner of envelope.
Stamping image on corner of envelope. | Source
Stamped envelope.
Stamped envelope. | Source
Stack of completed cards and envelopes.
Stack of completed cards and envelopes. | Source

Step 10: Arrange the gift basket.

Place the stationery in the gift basket how you see fit.

For example, the note cards may be in a box. Tie a bow (or use baker's twine) around it and place inside the basket along with loose decorative papers. Or, roll the papers like a scroll and tie with a ribbon. Then tie to the top of the box with a bow.

There are many ways to organize the stationery inside the basket.

The key is to decorate the basket to match the stationery.

If using a floral patterned rubber stamp, you can find silk flowers to match the design. Roses for rose pattern, irises for iris pattern, and so forth.

You can also use tissue paper to fill the basket, and coordinating ribbon to tie around the basket or over the basket handle.


Bonus.

When working with copic markers, bold and bright colors will bleed through cardstock. Flipping over the colored image will result in a watercolor look.

I prepared the image of the irises below as a greeting card topper. This would also work well as a gift tag.

Copic colored stamped image of irises.  Turning over the colored image makes this appear to be in watercolor.  Would look great as a gift tag.
Copic colored stamped image of irises. Turning over the colored image makes this appear to be in watercolor. Would look great as a gift tag. | Source

Conclusion.

Whether you want to create personalized stationery for yourself or to give away as a gift, rubber stamping is a relaxing and fun hobby.

Starting out decades ago, I owned a small three-drawer cart on wheels where I carefully arranged my rubber stamps. My collection has grown quite substantially.


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    • Imogen French profile image

      Imogen French 3 years ago from Southwest England

      A very thorough and comprehensive guide to using rubber stamps - the finished results speak for themselves, they look very professional. I love the dragonfly :)

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Thank you so much Imogen!

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I have a friend who does this and has shelves upon shelves packed with stamps and stamping equipment. She is definitely into it big time.

      Great information here my friend. It's pretty obvious you know what you are talking about. Well done!

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Billy! Thank you for commenting. Some times I think to myself, why don't I just write what I know and what's in front of me....LOL

    • peachpurple profile image

      peachy 3 years ago from Home Sweet Home

      wow, sure needs a lot of materials to make these personalized rubber stamps. Thanks for sharing

    • Mhatter99 profile image

      Martin Kloess 3 years ago from San Francisco

      Wow, what a great idea. thank you

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      How to create your own rubber stamped stationery one of your best hubs. Most interesting, creative, useful and with such presentation it makes the hub most helpful. Voted up, interesting, useful, and awesome, Facebook LIKED and SHARED

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
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      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Peach! Thank you for commenting. Rubber stamping can be very expensive at times. I started my hobby years ago so I have grown quite a collection. One time I found a huge auction lot of stamps for one-tenth what I would have paid at the store. There was also a store near my home that closed and I shopped at the clearance sale. But, it can be a costly investment now a days. I haven't bought a new stamp in some time, except for clear ones that tend to be cheaper.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
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      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Thank you for commenting Mhatter! It's nice to see you.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      DDE, thank you so much! This one was really fun to write because I love rubber stamping.

    • Eiddwen profile image

      Eiddwen 3 years ago from Wales

      A wonderful hub; I must vote up, share and save onto my FB page A Brand new Dawn.

      Eddy.

    • kidscrafts profile image

      kidscrafts 3 years ago from Ottawa, Canada

      I love the embossing technique! I remember that I did it with my students at school! I had a one plate stove for that activity... so each of them had to wait their turn!

      As you said, it's a great way to create special stationary or even create great gifts!

      Great hub, well organized information, and fantastic pictures to illustrate!

      Voted up, interesting and beautiful!

    • epbooks profile image

      Elizabeth Parker 3 years ago from Las Vegas, NV

      I love your hubs- very educational and useful. I had no idea there was so much to it. I thought you walk into Michael's and buy the stamp! This is awesome. Your user name is very fitting, Crafty! You have so much talent!

    • purl3agony profile image

      Donna Herron 3 years ago from USA

      Love this! I thought I knew about rubber stamps, but I had no idea of the options and products available!! I've always wanted a collection of various alphabet stamps in different type faces, but the stamps can be expensive. I'll have to start slowly to build the materials and techniques that you have at hand :) Just beautiful!

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 3 years ago from Central Florida

      This is great, Crafty. I have to hand it to you. I have absolutely no patience for crafts. About 30 years ago I started crocheting a blanket for a friend who was expecting her first baby. I never did finish it.

      Your stationary is beautiful. You should consider selling your designs to local card shops and office supply stores. Just a thought....

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
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      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Thank you so much Eiddwen.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
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      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Thank you very much for your comments kidscrafts. I actually was invited to teach a class at a private school. I went to a rubber stamp store an hour away just to get some really special papers and materials for the class participants. It was fun.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
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      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Thank you EP! I've been a rubber stamper for a long time. I can still remember sitting in that first class thinking why in the world was I even entertaining the thought. And then I was floored when the artist showed everyone what could be done with a stamp! I was hooked.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
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      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Thank you Purl! Stamps were so expensive when I first started out way back then as well. I remember some of the House Mouse stamps were $15 just for one. We had one rubber stamp store in town at the time. Ironically, that store is no longer there at all. Once stamps became popular on the internet, the owner went out of business. I've had great success shopping online for lots of stamps at a time, and on clearance.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
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      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Brave! I have never learned how to knit or crochet. In fact, the last time I tried, I cried. It was just awful. LOL

      When I first started rubber stamping, friends started ordering custom cards such as invitations. Then I gave it up for a while to start a family. After my grandmother passed away in 2007, I had this burst of creative energy and started selling my work online. Someone stole a design and submitted it to a card magazine. That was quite a shock. The person stole it and got paid for it, and it was published under their name!

      A couple of years ago I started taking custom orders again. Sometimes I get some really big orders. I also got a job working for the recreation director at a nursing home. I started doing custom scrapbook pages for the residents and bulletin board designs for the nursing home. Then my son was diagnosed with Autism, I was sick for a while...but now I'm slowly gaining my stamina.

      Thank you for such thoughtful comments!

    • kidscrafts profile image

      kidscrafts 3 years ago from Ottawa, Canada

      I am sure the kids loved creating stationery with you! They learned something that they for most of them would probably have never learned. Good for you!

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Thank you Kidscrafts! That's true. Most often when I tell people I rubber stamp, they don't even know what that means. LOL

    • wetnosedogs profile image

      wetnosedogs 3 years ago from Alabama

      I learned something new today. I didn't know all those goes into making such lovely note cards and such.

      I love the dragonfly.

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 3 years ago from England

      This was a really clever and fascinating read, I really love them! my friend does something similar I will have to show her these! wonderful!

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
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      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Wetnose. Thank you so much for your thoughtful comments.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Nell! Thank you! I've seen some amazing talent in the greeting card and rubber stamping arts come out of England. My great-grandmother was from England. She actually hand drew her designs and sold them in Boston years and years ago.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
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      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Nell, I just noticed it says comment was deleted by user. I didn't delete your comments. I just wanted that to be known in case someone sees it and thought I did it! :D Your comments are more than welcome here any time.

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 3 years ago from England

      lol! Don't worry Crafty, it was me! my stupid pc decided in its wisdom to print the comment twice, it tends to do that a lot, I have no idea why! maybe its because I use firefox, not sure, so if it happens again its usually for that reason, and many of us do it too, nell

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
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      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      LOL, thank you! I thought oh boy, I must have hit a wrong button!

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 3 years ago from England

      Lol!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Excellent hub from someone who obviously knows her stuff. I really loved both the images and the tips. I haven't tried rubber stamping but after reading this, I imagine it could be really enjoyable. Voted up and more, sharing.

    • Dolores Monet profile image

      Dolores Monet 3 years ago from East Coast, United States

      Every once in awhile I look at the stamps in our local craft store and it amazes me how pretty they are. The vast array of designs makes it look like you could do almost anything. But I can see why it would help to take a class. It all looks like so much! Very nice! (Voted up and shared)

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
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      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Thank you so much Flourish. I really do enjoy it. I find that I lack energy and time most often to really throw myself in to it. It takes a lot of time. So I don't like to start a project and not be able to complete it. But it is very relaxing, especially if I have a really creative idea in mind and have time to complete it.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
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      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Dolores! Thank you so much for your thoughtful comments. We don't have many stores left around here. We have AC Moore, Michaels, and a new Hobby Lobby opened up in New Haven, CT, or Warwick, Rhode Island, both an hour from here. The smaller stores all closed.

    • prasetio30 profile image

      prasetio30 3 years ago from malang-indonesia

      Very creative and I love your idea here. I'll share with my students. I believe that they'll love it. Thank you very much. VOTED UP :-)

      Prasetio

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hello Prasetio! It's so nice to see you. I remember conversing with you back when you published the miniature food Hub which I thoroughly enjoyed. Thank you so much. I hope your students will find it helpful.

    • Laura Schneider profile image

      Laura Schneider 3 years ago from Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, USA

      What a creative, awesome hub! I learned so much my head is bursting to try some of your tips and tricks! Thanks for writing this, CraftytotheCore!

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Thank you so much for reading and commenting Laura. That's how I felt when I took my first class. I couldn't wait to get started. Here I am after all these years and it's still my favorite thing to do.

    • mylindaelliott profile image

      mylindaelliott 3 years ago from Louisiana

      Great information and advice. I didn't realize how rewarding creating rubber stamped stationary could be.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Linda, thank you so much for commenting. It's very relaxing too.

    • Vellur profile image

      Nithya Venkat 3 years ago from Dubai

      Great hub, creative and useful information. Voted up.

    • Laura Schneider profile image

      Laura Schneider 3 years ago from Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, USA

      I've totally got to do this--the price of traditional greeting cards is RIDICULOUS nowadays, and I think most people would rather receive a handwritten note of "Happy Birthday" or whatever in any case. I'll have a hard time restraining myself on buying too many supplies to start, though. LOL I've been in such stores and told myself I couldn't start another "hobby" (I have many) but if I look at it as saving money on purchased stationery while having relaxing fun, the benefits outweigh the cost. :-) Thanks again!!

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
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      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Vellur! Thank you very much!

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Hi Laura! I have purchased large aution lots of stamps on eBay for much cheaper than the stores. Some stores here give really big discounts like 40-50% off every so often on stamps. I haven't purchased any new wood mount stamps in some time, but now my habit is collecting those clear rubber stamps. They are way cheaper. There are crystal mounting blocks that you can pick up for $1 at Joann Fabrics.

    • Laura Schneider profile image

      Laura Schneider 3 years ago from Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, USA

      Hey, thanks again CraftytotheCore! That's super-helpful! (And might be a good topic for another hub--hint hint). :-) I'll keep an eye out for discounts, and definitely check out Joann Fabrics (which is really more of a craft store now than a fabric store). P.S. I sent you an email...

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Yes! Sorry, I replied on one of your Hubs to that email. LOL. I don't mind at all Laura. Thanks for stopping by again!

    • Laura Schneider profile image

      Laura Schneider 3 years ago from Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, USA

      Thank YOU, CraftytotheCore! You're the best!

    • CraftytotheCore profile image
      Author

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      You are welcome Laura! :D

    • vocalcoach profile image

      Audrey Hunt 7 months ago from Nashville Tn.

      I'm excited about learning to do this. It is more involved than I realized but I still want to tackle it. I'm saving your hub to refer to along my way.

      Thanks for taking time to create this step-by-step instruction. This helps so much! Sharing and pinning.

    • Kailua-KonaGirl profile image

      June Parker 5 months ago from New York

      I have been hiding under a rock, I guess, as this is the 1st time I ever heard of this idea and think it is a fabulous one! I love the thought of making personalized stationery or note cards. Your instructions are spot on and most inspiring! I always thought rubber stamping was nothing more than grabbing an ink pad and a stamp and having at it. LOL. Thanks so much for enlightening and inspiring. Pinning to my DIY Craft Ideas Board at https://www.pinterest.com/konagirl/diy-craft-ideas...

      as I do want to get the supplies and make an attempt.

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