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Jane Austen Valentine Sweets

Updated on April 6, 2016

Regency Era Valentine's Day

Have you ever wanted to be lost in a world of romance, manners and Jane Austen? If the answer is yes you can have a Regency Era Valentine's Day. This can be part of a party or a private dinner for you and the man you love and it is not as hard as you think to recreate this magical time in history.

There are many recipes from the past that can be recreated today and here are just a few in this lens, plus a few easy mixes and everyday foods that existed in Jane Austen's time.

Clotted cream is somewhere between butter and cream, and will look like custard. Heavy whipping cream is the only ingredient, do not use ultra-pasteurized cream.

Ingredients

  • Heavy Whipping Cream

Cook Time

Prep Time:

Total Time:

Serves:

Instructions

  1. Use as much cream as you like. Say you want to start with 2 pints. Pour the cream into a heavy bottomed ovenproof pot. The cream should come up the sides about three inches. Pre-heat an oven to 180 F. Cover the pot and place in the oven. Your cream will have to cook for at least 8 hours maybe longer and most newer ovens will automatically turn off after 12 hours. If it is done there will be a thick yellow skin over the cream. The skin is actually the clotted cream. Let the pot cool to room temperature, then you can place the pot in the refrigerator for another eight hours. You could also use a spatula and gather the cream and place it inside your refrigerator, but you still have to wait 8 hours before you use it. The cream can stay in the fridge for up to four days. Clotted cream can be spread on pancakes, toast or high tea cupcakes and drinks.
  2. You can also buy clotted cream from many websites, including Amazon, it will be creamier, but not as fresh tasting. I've made clotted cream, but I've never had it from the store.
5 stars from 1 rating of Clotted Cream

Silver Plated Cups

This is the type of silver plated set they used on the set of the 1995 Television mini-series Pride and Prejudice that aired on A & E, back when they were still making fantastic movies. This set is a bit pricey, but worth it if you are going to have more than one fancy party with your friends. You could also use a glass punch bowl with fancy matching glass cups.

Syllabub - Painting is Cherry Blossoms By Vincent Van Gogh

Before the 17 hundreds this was made by milking a cow into pot of ale and cider. It was a frothy liquor, the cream would be eaten with a desert spoon and the liguid would be sipped.

Cook Time

Prep Time:

Total Time:

Serves: Sufficient for 5 or 6 people.

Ingredients

  • 1 and 1/2 pints Milk
  • 1 pint Sherry or White Wine or Cider and Brandy
  • I use grape juice (I don't drink)
  • 1/2 Grated Nutmeg
  • Sugar
  • to taste

Instructions

  1. Pure wine or grape juice into a bowl, with the grated nutmeg and plenty of caster sugar add the milk and whisk. A tad bit of brandy can be mixed into the wine before the milk is added. In some counties, cider is substituted for the wine, when this is used, they say brandy must always be added. Clotted cream or whipped cream can be placed on top, with ground cinnamon or nutmeg and sugar. Warmed milk can be poured on from a teapot, but it must be held very high.

Classic Cheesecake

This is a modern recipe for a classic cheesecake.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups graham cracker crumbs
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar (for the crust)
  • 1 stick melted
  • allow to cool
  • 3 (8-ounce) packages of cream cheese at room temp
  • 3 large eggs
  • room temp
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1 tablespoon fresh-squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • room temp

Instructions

  1. Read all instructions before attempting recipe
  2. Set out the cream cheese, eggs and cream an hour before hand, so they are at room temp.
  3. Preheat oven to 350 degrees or 315 for convection ovens. Wrap the bottom of an 8-in spring form (pan with a clasp that comes apart to help prevent sticking) pan with two layers of heavy-duty aluminum foil. Set aside another ovenproof pan that it can sit inside. These will be used as a water bath when cooking your cheesecake, so make sure the aluminum foil comes up enough to keep water out of your cake. Cut a round piece of parchment to cover the bottom of the springform pan, and set it inside.
  4. Mix the graham crackers, two tablespoons of sugar, and the cooled butter in the bottom of the springform pan. Once it begins to cling together, use a cup and firmly press the cookie crumbs onto the bottom of the pan and half way up the sides. Place this pan into the larger ovenproof pan and set aside.
  5. Beat the cream cheese for a minimum of 3 minutes; add the remaining cup sugar and beat the mixture until it’s light and creamy. Start the mixer on a med/low speed and work up to med/high as the cream cheese becomes smoother. Use a spatula to scrape down the sides and the beaters while mixing so. It can take up to five minutes of beating to get a smooth, fluffy cream cheese texture. Add eggs one at a time, beating at med speed for each egg. Increase the speed of the mixer to high and let this mix while you add the lemon juice and vanilla to your cream mixture. It may curdle the cream, there might be lumps in the cream, it’s normal. On low speed of the mixer, carefully add the cream mixture and mix well at med speed. Frequently scrape down the sides and the beaters with a spatula so the mixture is creamy. Pour the mixture into the prepared springform pan.
  6. Place the two (2) pans into the oven on the middle rack, and fill the larger, outside pan with hot water until it is about half way up the sides of your cheesecake pan. Bake until it is golden brown and the edges are firm to about 1 inch in on the pan, about 40 minutes. Turn off oven, crack the door open, but leave the cheesecake inside until they are cool enough to be touched. This is the time the cake will firm up, so it does not jiggle when you remove the pan. Don’t check for it’s done by inserting a fork into the cheesecake. There shouldn’t be any liquid areas in the center of the cheesecake. The cheesecake does continues to cook when it is removed from the oven. Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack. Cool the cake completely before even attempting to take it out of the spring from pan. Release the sides and slide the cheesecake up and out of the pan. The parchment in the button of the pan will make this easier, carefully slide the cheesecake onto your serving plate.
  7. Toppings
  8. Drisle with chocolate and caramel sauce
  9. Eat plain or place clotted cream on top.
  10. Spray with wipe cream and cover with cherries out of the can or fresh strawberries
I put this public domain photo from the 1800s through a filter to make look like a drawing.
I put this public domain photo from the 1800s through a filter to make look like a drawing. | Source

Foods We Have Now And Then

Sugar Cookies were around then, pink lemonade, teacakes with icing and cheesecakes were all staples of a fancy Regency dinner. These items can be bought in mix form or in a local bakery. They also had Ice Cream, or Italian Ices and Hot Chocolate which was called drinking Chocolate.

For dinner you can have any number of roasted meats, steamed veggies and rolls.

You could water to drink, grape juice, water or wine if you drink. One thing you could have is pink lemonade. Pink lemonade was invented in France in the 16th century.

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      MintySea 4 years ago

      that sounds like fun

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      A Jane Austen Valentine's Day would be very sweet and let's get started on that clotted cream now! How delightful Stacy!

    • Gypzeerose profile image

      Rose Jones 5 years ago

      Loved this lens - now I have to finally go and read Pride and Prejudice !

      Angel blessed.

    • flycatcherrr profile image

      flycatcherrr 5 years ago

      My imagination just got stuck on the bit about "milking a cow into pot of ale and cider" for syllabub... Yes, we'll stick with the newfangled way to make it. :)

      What a creative approach to a Valentine's meal - well done!