ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Ten Best Decorations for a Pagan Yule Tree

Updated on September 12, 2014

Decorating a Tree for Yule

Cultures around the world have decorated trees and brought living greenery into winter homes as part of their traditional celebrations for thousands of years.

The Christmas tree originated in Germany and it too has its roots in earlier Pagan traditions. For this reason, you will often find a decorated tree in the homes of practicing Pagans around the Winter Solstice time.

We certainly enjoy having our tree with all the lights and decorations. It brings a sense of the holiday spirit to our home as we celebrate the return of the Sun once more to the earth.

Here you will find some ideas for ways to decorate your own Yule tree in the Pagan traditions.

Make Your Own Decorations

Some of the best Yule decorations don't come from the shop, they're made by hand in your own home.

For great family fun, spend an evening stringing popcorn and dried fruit on heavy string. These garlands can then be hung on the tree.

Oranges studded with whole cloves give off a very nice aroma while providing lovely hanging baubles.

Give coloured paper and crayons to little ones and let them create snowflakes and other decorations.

1. More Holiday Craft Ideas - for kids of any ages

175 Easy-to-Do Christmas Crafts
175 Easy-to-Do Christmas Crafts

Have a look through this book if you'd like some holiday decorating ideas beyond stringing popcorn and cranberries on a thread.

 

The Yule Log

Early Europeans would bring a giant log into their homes and burn it to celebrate the return of the Sun God at the Winter Solstice each year.

Over thousands of years this tradition has altered and transformed. Most homes no longer have large fireplaces built for burning large logs. The Yule log has gotten smaller and smaller, and in many places been replaced entirely by a decorated chocolate cake.

2. Your Own Yule Log

Birch Yule Logs
Birch Yule Logs

Huge fireplaces that could hold an entire tree are a thing of the past, and many houses if they have a fireplace are purely decorative. Add to your Yuletide decorations with these Yule Logs.

 

Beneath the tree

the altar cloth

In decorating a tree, the Pagan is creating a small altar. A cloth under the tree can be used not only to cover tree stands and electrical devices, but also as part of the decorations.

Choose a length of fabric that is bright gold, red or green and wrap it round the base of the tree after you've finished decorating.

A Bit of Winter Greenery

Evergreen branches, holly leaves, mistletoe

These were all signs that life still remained on the earth. These plants were sacred to the Pagans of long ago.

They celebrated the return of the Sun God by bringing branches of these sacred plants into their homes to decorate the hearth.

So, deck those halls with boughs of holly. Hang up the mistletoe. It's all part of the Pagan traditions.

4. Holly Branches

If you don't have a holly tree in your garden, you could instead use this length of holly leaves. Best of all, you can re-use it for years to come.


5. And Mistletoe

Mistletoe can be found growing on trees in England, but it can still be difficult to find around the holidays. I usually buy mine at the shops.

Silver and Gold

Silver for the Mother Goddess who gives birth to the Sun God each Winter Solstice

Gold for the Sun God, reborn each year at the Winter Solstice.

Silver Stars and Moons and Gold Suns.

Hang them with abandon from your tree.

6. Silver Moon and Stars

Glitter Moon and Star Hanging (Glitter Silver)
Glitter Moon and Star Hanging (Glitter Silver)

Decorate your Yule tree with lots of dangling moons and stars.

 

7. Gold Suns

Twinkling lights

The Solstice is one of the Fire Festivals. It's celebrating the return of the Sun.

Once upon a time, candles with open fires were placed upon the tree. This is much too dangerous, so we substitute strands of electric lights.

Picture in public domain. Dreigiebelhaus (three-gables-house) Am Laien in Ditzingen, Baden-WÃrttemberg, Germany, with christmas illuminations. The house is the town's landmark and includes since 1993 the towns library and gallery.

8. Lights

If you're tired of replacing bulbs and strands of non-functioning lights each year, take a close look at the LED lights that are available. These lights last a very long time, they use minimal electricity, and they look pretty.

Yule Wheels

Yule can be translated to mean 'wheel', which one of the Pagan symbols of the sun.

So, hang up your wreaths of holly and evergreen bows, and celebrate the rebirth of the Sun God.

9. Yule wreaths

I have made my own wreath using cast off branches from the Christmas tree. This can be fiddly work, but well worth the effort when you see it finished.

If you'd like something a bit less fiddly, why not get a green wreath and add your own decorative bits of holly berries, mistletoe, and silver and gold to it.

Winter Birds and Woodland Creatures

The God as Lord of the Hunt is represented by woodland creatures such as deer and birds.

Ornaments of small animals, deer, and non-migrating birds are all appropriate representations for the tree.

We have a set of deer that hold tea lights and sit on our TV as part of our decorations. Hidden amongst the branches of our tree each year you can see a small English robin sitting in its nest.

10. Winter Birds

Tag Glass Bird Clip-on Christmas Ornaments, Set of 3, Red
Tag Glass Bird Clip-on Christmas Ornaments, Set of 3, Red

These red birds will look very pretty peeking through the green branches of your Yule tree.

 

How do you decorate for Yule?

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: High five ;-) very well said!

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @LadyJasmine LM: Your beautiful city's name is still carved into my healing candle, and my peace candle, which I light and burn every day, and when it burns down, i carve the names onto a new candle and light it from the old. Just know that you and your neighbors are not forgotton, at least not by me. Blessed Be.

    • profile image

      grannysage 4 years ago

      We aren't able to have a tree this year in our RV, but we still have our box of Yule ornaments. Because we could never find any decorations that said, "Welcome Yule" we made our own. I have lots of pagan themed decorations. It is too bad the previous visitor was so angry. May all things well and good come to you and yours this Yule.

    • NanLT profile image
      Author

      Nan 4 years ago from London, UK

      @NanLT: I should really proofread better. In 1998, I was initiated as a 3rd degree Wiccan in the Blue Star Tradition.

    • NanLT profile image
      Author

      Nan 4 years ago from London, UK

      @anonymous: Samantha, I can sense a lot of anger from you. I hope you are able to work through this. I am Pagan. I am witch. I'm also an initiated 2rd degree Wiccan, but that is neither here nor there.

      I hold no anger towards those who practice any of the Christian religions, or for that matter any other of the Abrahamic religions. I have found many beautiful items for ritual and spellcasting in a variety of places, including those which would most typically be considered "Christian". I chose to feature the first item because I would gladly display it on my own tree, whether it be called a Yule tree, a Solstice tree, or a Christmas tree.

      True, many items which are considered to be "Pagan" have been adopted and adapted and are now used within the Christian faith. That doesn't make their use by Christians of any denomination any less valid. Neither does it make their use by Pagans of any denomination more valid.

      I feel no shame. I have no reason to feel shame. I also hold no anger. Be well Samantha.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I am insulted by your first choice about decorating your tree for Yule in a store that is 100% Christian. Bronners CHRISTmas wonderland. Can you tell me what does this store have anything to do with Yule or the Winter Sostice? The reason you will find a tree in a Pagan home is because it is a Pagan tradition. In my home I will have a Solstice tree that has nothing to do with Christianity. Christians have chosen to put Solstice trees in their homes for what reason I cannot even begin to guess. The Solstice tree has nothing to do with Christian traditions any more than mistletoe or the Yule log. Everything you mention on this page is Pagan or Wiccan and has nothing to do with Christianity. You use Wiccan traditions just the same way you use other Wiccan traditions. You do all this in the name of your God. You use our traditions and at the same time you same time you say the most awful things about people you know nothing about. Shame on you.

    • LadyJasmine LM profile image

      LadyJasmine LM 6 years ago

      Funny enough, being a Pagan that has lived in New Orleans, my love of the city now spills over onto my tree decorating. I do use lights and suns and moons, as well as lots of balls and ornaments; but I also use mardis gras beads woven together as garland, and parade throws from Mardis Gras for some of the ornaments. Parades like Bacchus, Muses, and Thoth sometimes have interesting throws one can relate to Pagan things- lol. For me, it's a mixture of an old tradition, with the idea of also sending love and healing to a beautiful city that still needs it. :-)

    • Lemming13 profile image

      Lemming13 6 years ago

      I use holly twined with ivy - gets a bit prickly, but I like to remember the Holly King and the Ivy Queen, an old pagan tradition lost in the song The Holly and the Ivy. I swap for rosemary, hellebore and christmas box on Twelfth Night. Love this lens.

    • JenOfChicago LM profile image

      JenOfChicago LM 7 years ago

      Thanks for this - I was wondering what to get a pagan friend that I am "secret santa" for, and those bird decorations look like a great idea.

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      Interesting and informative lens. I particularly like the English Robin, they are much smaller than the North American Robin. Also I think that their red breast is redder. Thanks for the lens.

    Click to Rate This Article