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Beginning A Freelance Writing Career Tips For Success

Updated on October 7, 2013

Wisdom from the Byrds

“So you want to be a rock 'n' roll star?

Then listen now to what I say
Just get an electric guitar
Then take some time
And learn how to play
And with your hair swung right
And your pants too tight
It's gonna be all right
Then it's time to go downtown
Where the agent man won't let you down
Sell your soul to the company
Who are waiting there to sell plastic ware
And in a week or two
If you make the charts
The girls'll tear you apart

The price you paid for your riches and fame
Was it all a strange game?
You're a little insane
The money, the fame, the public acclaim
Don't forget what you are
You're a rock 'n' roll star!”

I don’t know why my mind went to the classic rock song by the Byrds but go there it did.

So you want to be a freelance writer? Then listen now to what I say.

Who wouldn’t want to be a freelance writer? Wear sweats to work each day; write an article or two, get in touch with your agent, do a book signing each week and rake in the millions of dollars….what’s not to like about that deal?

Well my friends, the reality of freelance writing is a bit different. When I think of freelance writing I think of one of the greats of all time in Major League Baseball…. Pete Rose….his nickname was Charlie Hustle. A freelance writer must be a hustler. He/she must constantly push, push and push again in search of writing gigs. Query letters are as much a part of their life as eating, and at times they have a desperate hold on sanity and a tenuous hold on reality.

They succeed because of a combination of talent, luck and marketing skills, and if they fail it is usually because they lack those same attributes.

So you want to be a freelance writer? Then listen now to what I say.

It begins at the computer; set up a work office
It begins at the computer; set up a work office | Source

Freelance Writing Is a Business

“There is only one boss. The customer. And he can fire everybody in the company from the chairman on down, simply by spending his money somewhere else.

Sam Walton

First lesson of the day: freelance writing is a business! Do not confuse writing with freelance writing. The former is done for the pure joy of bettering a craft; the latter is done to survive economically. Freelance writing is a business and as such it must be treated as one. There are millions of freelance writers in the world today, but there are billions of readers as well. Freelance writing is not so much about defeating the competition as it is about appealing to the consumer. If you do not understand that distinction then you have not been writing long enough.

I write eight to ten hours each day. I have a schedule that I stick to religiously. I have a business plan, tax files, business hours and short-and-long range goals. I eat well when my business does well; I eat frugally when my business does poorly. I have extras when my marketing plan has been successful; I have no extras when my marketing plan has failed.

In other words, I am the CEO of my business and my business is freelance writing.

Any questions?

If you think you can treat freelance writing like a hobby and become rich and famous then you really need to see about getting your meds increased.

Think Small and Then Branch out to Big

I will repeat an earlier statement: there are millions of freelance writers in the world, and many of them have much more experience than you have, most definitely if you are just starting out. That means they have made contacts with editors and agents and publishers and it means they have a working relationship with others in the business. It means they understand what it takes to succeed in this business, they have developed their platform and they have established a name for themselves.

All of that took time, and it will take you time as well, and there is no better place to begin your march towards the top than at the bottom.

Actors do not start out making multi-million dollar movies. They begin with local theater and indie films; they establish themselves in the profession; they work their way up the ladder of success. The same is true for freelance writers.

My first freelance job was with a content mill making $10 per 400 words. Hardly the stuff of legends. My first magazine article was a freebie to a local online publication in Olympia, Washington. Again, hardly the stuff of legends, but it was necessary to gain credits and become established in this business.

Build your foundation and then you can begin framing the building.

You can freelance from any city around the world; all you need is determination
You can freelance from any city around the world; all you need is determination | Source

I have found this writer to be very truthful and realistic

Maximize Each Article

One article to one publication does not equate to riches. One article to several publications at least will pay the utility bill.

If I write an article about Mount Rainier, which I have, I can pitch that article to a national parks magazine. I can also pitch it to a Washington State travel magazine. I can also pitch that article to an RV magazine and a vacation magazine and a……

Get the picture? There are exclusive publication rights, but there are also reprint rights, meaning that the same article can be published in several periodicals and they all pay you. Why limit yourself to one pay day when multiple pay days await you?

The same can be said for syndication. If you query a newspaper with an article idea, then syndicate that idea and pitch it to one hundreds newspapers; each one will pay as long as they receive exclusive rights for their area.

Don’t sell yourself short. If you have an excellent article then let it work for you.

Don’t Quit Your Day Job

Becoming a successful freelance writer takes time, as in a year or more. This is a case of doing as I say and not as I have done, because this writer did quit his full-time job with benefits to start from scratch as a freelance writer with no benefits. I was in a unique situation with few bills and some savings to tide me over until I became established, but few writers have that luxury.

A general rule of thumb tossed about in the freelance world is do not go full-time in freelancing and do not quit your day job until you are making at least 50% of your normal income from writing, and then think long and hard about making the break from the security of your regular job.

It is frightening to have no safety net. There is a great deal of pressure. There are endless anxious nights as the bills pile up and the rejection letters pile up with the bills. There are thousands of excellent writers out there who are barely scraping by, so keep those realities in mind before you pull the plug on a guaranteed income and venture into the shark-filled waters of freelancing.

When you first start out, try as many paths as possible to build your platform
When you first start out, try as many paths as possible to build your platform | Source

One Final Tip

Don't limit yourself to one avenue of freelancing. There are more ways to make money in this business besides magazines. Try your hand at screenplays. Try your hand at ghostwriting. Try resumes and copywriting and yes, even try the content mills if you must. Every job adds to your platform and your credibility as a professional freelance writer.

Another helpful tip

That’s Enough to Get You Started

Most of the important things in the world have been accomplished by people who have kept on trying when there seemed to be no hope at all.

Dale Carnegie

“When there seemed to be no hope at all……” Yes indeed, welcome the world of freelance writing. There will be times when you question your sanity and doubt in your abilities. There will be times when the pressure becomes almost unbearable. This is no easy gig and it is not a gig for the easily-deterred. Fame and fortune are pinpricks of light in the distance, and percentages will tell you that few truly make it in this freelance world.

Still, it is a rush. It is an adrenalin-fueled walk on the wild side, feeding the need that is in all freelance writers. One small victory keeps us hungry and hopeful; one query acceptance sends us back to the writing board to pour out another thousand words and part of our soul.

If that sounds like something you can embrace then welcome to the fold. Misery loves company but so, too, does success.

2013 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

“Helping writers to spread their wings and fly.”

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    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 3 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      One year just seemed too short a time for me. I am on the two year plan. I sure wish those 10$ for 400 words paid better. I had fun doing that work. Learned a lot. Shoot real publishing seems a forever away as I cannot even get featured here anymore ;-)

    • tillsontitan profile image

      Mary Craig 3 years ago from New York

      "Misery loves company but so, too, does success." What better way to entice us! Jump into the pool but do it right and that we will if we keep reading your wonderful tips.

      Voted up, useful, awesome, and interesting.

    • Janine Huldie profile image

      Janine Huldie 3 years ago from New York, New York

      Bill, I know you know your stuff on this and what can I say, but great job explaining to those who are trying their hand at this for the first time and loved the Byrd's reference in the beginning, too!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Eric, then it might be time to change your approach. :) Kick around ways to come from a new angle and deliver the same message. Sit down with that lovely bride of yours and see if you can't find a new direction or path. Best wishes my friend and thank you.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mary, I have said it before, but your Academy Awards series is a great one....now figure out how to morph it into a magazine article.....I know you can do it. :) Thank you so much, Mary! Have a great week.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Janine. You live and breathe this advice, so keep on keeping on and good things will come to you.

    • profile image

      DJ Anderson 3 years ago

      Great words of advice. We can never accuse you of sugar coating what it

      takes to succeed.

      You are a born leader, Bill. We respect your opinion and envy your

      fortitude.

      Happy Monday!

      DJ.

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 3 years ago from Central Florida

      You sure said it, Bill. We question ourselves, doubt ourselves, fill up with anguish and wonder if it's all worth it. I did the same as you - put the cart before the horse when I quit my job a year ago. I'm still struggling, but learning and working on honing my craft. Sometimes I think I'm being foolish in refusing to write for the content mills. But like, Eric said, you learn a lot. The downside is you have nothing to show for it; no copyrights and in many cases, no file copies of what you've written, depending on the mills' format.

      But I refuse to give up. The light at the end of the tunnel will shine brighter as long as I keep at 'this writing gig' as you so fondly call it.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      It's funny, DJ, but I have heard those words before, about being a leader, and I am the least imposing human being you will find. I am quiet and shy and do not seek the limelight....and yet....

      Thank you my friend. I hope your week is filled with beautiful phrases and unforgettable prose.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sha, that's the thing about that light at the end of the tunnel...it gets brighter the closer you get to it, and the only way to get closer to it is to move forward. :) Love you, Sha!

    • Radcliff profile image

      Liz Davis 3 years ago from Hudson, FL

      I'll always take advice from a man with a gray beard.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      LOL....you have a once in a lifetime mind and I love every bit of you, Lizzy!

    • profile image

      anndango 3 years ago

      Great points about freelance writing. It does take time and hard work. It suits me and my lifestyle, but it's not for everyone. And funny you mentioned pitching to magazines. I just wrote a hub on that!

    • epbooks profile image

      Elizabeth Parker 3 years ago from Las Vegas, NV

      Fantastic, wonderfully written hub and excellent advice. I can't hear it enough as just when I start to feel lazy, I will read these and become gainfully inspired. Thank you Bill for that bit of motivation today!

    • CraftytotheCore profile image

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Billy, these words are true and are taken very seriously. You know I'm one of your biggest fans. I learned here from day 1, when I foolishly wrote something and then took a break for 2 weeks....it's a continuous momentum. It must be done diligently, with a goal and attitude in mind.

      When I trained my stray dog to walk around an unfenced yard, it took a long time. In fact, I was forced to do it when I went paralyzed. I could no longer walk with her.

      I am now applying that same strength and focus I found through recovery to writing here. One day at a time with vision.

      I just watched Alfred Hitchcock's movie last night about how psycho came to theater. He had a vision. While everyone around him said he would fail, he plugged forward. When he wasn't giving any backing at all and had to fund the production by mortgaging his house, he did so knowing the result would be worth it. He took a horror to a whole new level. That's how I approach things when everyone around me tells me I'll never make it.

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Beginning A Freelance Writing Career Tips For Success a goal to write and to continue to write to see improvement in ones steady platform. I have learned about the many challenging fields of writing from you and always enjoy reading another new hub from you because your hubs explains it all in detail about the many obstacles in the writing field and so much more. Each day new step to a new challenge

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      anndango, it suits me as well, but there are a lot of people who think this will be a walk in the park and boy oh boy, are they in for a surprise. :) Thanks as always.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Liz, you are a walking, talking success story. You have a wonderful platform already and I would be shocked if better days are not ahead of you. Keep doing what you are doing; I believe in the way you are approaching this.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Brandi! A perfect example given by you. It literally takes years to become established in this business. I get emails all the time from writers asking why they aren't getting more views......BE PATIENT AND KEEP WORKING....my goodness, writing isn't like ordering fast food. It take work!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      DDE, I am very happy if my articles have helped you. Best wishes to you in your writing career and thank you very much.

    • Jackie Lynnley profile image

      Jackie Lynnley 3 years ago from The Beautiful South

      Love that snow photo! You have so much bill, I know you are bound to go somewhere with your writing. My heart is only half in it and I feel like I am on the never never plan. lol All my best to you though and I will push those buttons and share as long as I am reading you. Wish it were more; you deserve it.

    • profile image

      DJ Anderson 3 years ago

      This is a follow-up from my comment and your comment.....

      A leader is not a brash loud mouth who orders

      the following crowds with words of intimidation.

      A true leader does what he asks the crowds to do;

      the crowds follow willingly. The crowds will follow

      a beloved leader into harms way in battle,

      or into the fires of hell to fight for what they believe in.

      The word is "lead", not "coerce".

      You, kind sir, are a leader, by way of your actions.

      DJ. Oh, I just love it when I am right!!!!!

    • Minnetonka Twin profile image

      Linda Rogers 3 years ago from Minnesota

      Hey Billy-another, very to the point and informative hub. Thank you so much for your great suggestions here. We all listen to you because you know what your talking about.

      Question for you: do you consider freelance writing any writing-online: HubPages, magazine, newspaper etc... Just wondering what most people consider HubPages?? Anyway, great article and hit lots of buttons and voted up and shared.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jackie, you are such a sweetheart. Thank you1 I don't know where I'm going with my writing career, or if I'll even make it. But if I don't it won't be for lack of trying and desire. :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      LOL....DJ, I guess all I can say, then, is I love it when you are right too. :) thank you

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Minnetonka, it's an interesting question, and my answer is purely mine. I would expect quite a few to disagree with it. I do not consider HubPages to be freelance writing by definition. HP is passive income from a writer's community. Freelance writing refers more to the selling of articles and services. Now, that is subject to interpretation my friend, and I'm not sure it makes any difference whether I am right or wrong. LOL

      Thank you for your kind words.

    • DeborahNeyens profile image

      Deborah Neyens 3 years ago from Iowa

      Very good advice as always, Bill. I think the most important point you are making here is the need to treat freelancing as the business it is. Early in my freelance career, I took a webinar through Writer's Digest from a freelance writer named Kelly James-Enger. Kelly left her career as an attorney to become a writer (like me) and is now very successful at it (not so much like me). : ) Treating freelancing as a business was a point she hammered home again and again. I since purchased one of her books, called "Six Figure Freelancing," which has become something of a bible to me. Section 1, which covers about the first third of the book, goes into some detail about how to get in the business mindset. (Sections 2 and 3 cover how to be more efficient and how to use your connections, respectively.) It's a worthwhile read.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Deb and I'll try to find the time tor read that. My college degrees are actually in marketing and economics, and I've owned and operated three businesses, so getting into the business mindset has not been a problem for me. As for being successful....I'm still waiting my turn. :)

    • livingsta profile image

      livingsta 3 years ago from United Kingdom

      Hi Bill, so much useful information and advice, all in one hub. I do agree with not quitting the job until fully established. The very thought of bills piling up as a result is quite scary.

      Thank you for sharing this with us.

      Hope you are having a lovely day Bill.

      Sending you blessings and smiles :-)

    • heidithorne profile image

      Heidi Thorne 3 years ago from Chicago Area

      Love "writing is not freelance writing." True that!

      So as a follow up to The Byrds ballard and the Charlie Hustle reference, should we "Do the Hustle?" :)

      Happy Monday!

    • bdegiulio profile image

      Bill De Giulio 3 years ago from Massachusetts

      Great advice Bill. I admire you for taking the plunge and quitting your day job to write. A brave man you are. I like your advice to wait until you are generating at least 50% of your normal income before going full-time with freelance writing. There are so many things to consider before doing this; insurance coverage, benefits, vacation time, your current financial situation, etc. A lot to think about. Great advice as always. Have a great week.

    • DeborahNeyens profile image

      Deborah Neyens 3 years ago from Iowa

      Bill, I don't know that you'd get much out of the book I mentioned. I think your time would be better spent writing your own book! But others who are having trouble with that "writing as a business" mindset might find it good additional reading to complement your own excellent hub.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Dahlia, I don't want anyone to have the worries I did when I quit my job and went into writing full-time...it was scary but it sure was motivating. LOL

      blessings and a hug are yours

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Oh Heidi, how I hated that song. LOL But yes, it definitely applies to this discussion. Thanks for a touch of humor this Monday afternoon.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Bill, you are doing everything correctly. You are building your platform until the time comes when you can go full time...bravo for the work you have done so far; it will pay dividends in the long run.

      Thanks buddy!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Deb! It might surprise a lot of people to know I really don't like the business side of business. I hated business classes and theory and methods.....but I loved having my own business. I love the freedom and the responsibility, and being in charge of my own future. Anyway, thank you for your kind words.

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Isaac Weithers 3 years ago from The Caribbean

      Billy, I'll keep on receiving the information and motivation in your articles. I'm sure that the seed will germinate real soon. Thank you.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Dora, that is music to my ears my friend. I'll keep sending them out there and we will both celebrate when the germination occurs. :) Thank you!

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 3 years ago from England

      Hi bill, this is great advice, I have got really lazy lately with my writing, it seems other things keep getting in my way, but I would love to try and be more motivated, and that's where you come in! lol! you always give great advice, nell

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Nell, if I could figure out how to make money from these motivational lessons I might be able to retire some day. LOL Glad they help you, Nell, and thank you!

    • hawaiianodysseus profile image

      Hawaiian Odysseus 3 years ago from Southeast Washington state

      "... and at times they have a desperate hold on sanity and a tenuous hold on reality."

      Wow! In 16 words, you wrote my biography! LOL!

      I love this article, Bill! The reference to Pete Rose aka Charlie Hustle is priceless and apropos! By using it, you instantly planted in my heart a nostalgic remembrance of what DESIRE is all about. For me, the pure and original meaning of that word was all about wanting something so bad you could taste it...and you would do anything in the world to attain it. Linking the theme of this article to Pete Rose took me back, way back, to when Coach Masa Arinaga, fresh from his construction job wearing paint-stained polo shirt, khaki pants, and Converse basketball shoes, would have us boys gather 'round after practice and give us some final coaching tips...simple, down home, island style.

      A few years later, another fine coach, the best one I ever played under--my father--instilled in my teammates and me the meaning of the word, DESIRE.

      When you equate writing with some aspect of baseball, my friend, you inspire even a plug horse like me to steal home...

      Aloha, and thanks for being a great coach!

      ~Joe

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Dear Bill, I know one day we will all read of your great success story ... for you stay at it each day and you are determined to never give up. On my commute home, I was listening to a broadcast and it was so very interesting as the first words out of their mouths were, "So you want to be a writer ..." Caught my attention, and this woman told of her experience and explained that of course it is not easy and an overnight thing, but she finally got her book published, for she never gave up and learned everything she needed to learn about writing and now is experiencing success after summiting her manuscript to over 25 publications over several years. However, in the meantime, life happens, but she never gave up and worked and the end product, after the suggestions made by each publisher, she now realizes if that first publisher had published her book, it would not have been the excellent book it is today.

      I thought of you when listening to that program, and here you are writing the very same advice, to never give up and work hard at it, if you know in your heart that it is what you want to do in this life, then do it, day-by-day.

      Bless you, Faith Reaper

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Joe, I am guaranteed one thing in writing: if I make a reference about baseball that you will read it, get it and appreciate it. :)

      I would have loved to have met your dad...any man who preaches desire is my kind of guy.

      Still climbing that mountain my friend. I can see the summit but my legs are getting weary. :) Thanks buddy.

      Aloha

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Faith, that was a lovely story and lovely words of praise and I thank you for both of them. I may not become a famous writer but it won't be because I failed to give it every ounce in me. In the end that will be enough to bring a smile to my face when my days are donee.

      blessings to you always

      bill

    • LKMore01 profile image

      LKMore01 3 years ago

      Another brilliant article with practical wisdom and no non-sense advice, Bill. The reminder to keep all avenues open is being smart plain and simple. Copywriting, ghostwriting, blogging, editing, research etc... do it all. Why limit yourself? Fame is fleeting and unfortunately with our already saturated market it's nearly impossible to succeed having a tunnel vision view of a writing career. Persistence pays. Thank you again for sharing your knowledge.

    • tobusiness profile image

      Jo Alexis-Hagues 3 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

      Bill, loved the misery quote! The inspiration just keep coming, another great write from you.

      Take care and have a wonderful day. :)

    • Eiddwen profile image

      Eiddwen 3 years ago from Wales

      Hi Billy you are indeed so very inspiring and each hub so full of no nonsense advice. Each a great lesson in its own merits. Voting up and looking forward to many more. here's wishing you and Bev a great day.

      Eddy.

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      Connie Smith 3 years ago from Southern Tier New York State

      Billy, another sincere and necessary reality check as to the nature of this writing BUSINESS; that it is a business and it will only succeed if the owner keeps working toward a real goal. Well done as always, my friend;) Pearl

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      LK, it just makes sense, doesn't it? Everyone wants to write a book and move on to fame and fortune....it just doesn't happen very often, and for millions there needs to be a backup plan.

      Thank you for your kind words.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jo, I will have a wonderful day, thank you, and I wish the same for you in Jolly Old England. Blessings always my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Samita, it is not an easy job we have taken. We must be a writer and a marketing expert and never give up. Thank you for the visit.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Good morning Eddy and thank you. No nonsense....yes indeed, that's what you'll always get from me regarding the subject of writing. I want others to succeed. :)

      love,

      billy

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Connie. I know you understand the business aspect of this....you are doing well. Keep it up and good things will come to you.

      bill

    • stephensaldana profile image

      stephensaldana 3 years ago from Chicago

      Great words of wisdom Bill. Thanks again for the much needed insight.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Stephen, you are very welcome. Thank you!

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      Ann Carr 3 years ago from SW England

      Sound advice, bill. I think it's probably a good idea to do freelancing when you rely on it for a living - when you don't, you get lazy and think you've got all the time in the world. I have to make myself get down to writing the ones I want 'real' money for (rather than for fun like on hubpages). That's my downfall - I need to do what you say more often; plan, give myself a schedule, routine etc. It's a must for any serious writer.

      I'm away in France again, this time for a very short period - to sell the house (sob, sob!). When I get back, it'll be time to get down to the nitty-gritty as I'll have time with no excuses! All the best to you. Thanks for another great read. Ann

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, best of luck to you in that house sale. Sad times for you I'm sure, but a new chapter opens up. Yes my friend, a writing schedule and the determination to stick to it are keys for success. Good luck when you return to England and thank you as always.

      bill

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 3 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Strangely enough, last night and this morning - before I read your hub - I was thinking that I must treat writing more like a business. I love to write, but I want to make some money, too. Thanks for the tips, Bill, which as always are very useful.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Alicia, you are a very good writer and I hope these tips help you. If I can be of any help feel free to call on me, and thanks for stopping by.

    • vkwok profile image

      Victor W. Kwok 3 years ago from Hawaii

      This gets me interested in freelance writing. Thanks, bill.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      vkwok, you have what it takes my friend.

      Thank you!

    • Rosemay50 profile image

      Rosemary Sadler 3 years ago from Hawkes Bay - NewZealand

      You offer some great advice and tips Bill. Thank you.

      Congratulations too on winning a hubber award, well done

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Rosemay, thank you very much. I love HP and it has been a wonderful experience for me.

    • drbj profile image

      drbj and sherry 3 years ago from south Florida

      Realistic AND inspiring, Bill, and that ain't easy. But you were in error, m'dear, when you commented that you ... 'may not become a famous writer.' That is not true. You already ARE a famous (and beloved) writer! And congrats on the Hubbie award. I cannot think of anyone who deserves it more. Trust me!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you drbj, and congrats on your TWO Hubbies. Not a bad showing on your part my friend. :)

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      carol stanley 3 years ago from Arizona

      This freelancing is not for the faint of heart. However, I always believe when you want something--it not only takes hard work but lots of creative thinking to reach the goal you want. SOmetimes just an amazing thought will appear out of nowhere..

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      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Carol, I hope people read your comment because you are right on. Hard work, creativity and determination...that is what will garner success in this business. Thanks for that great comment.

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      Deb Hirt 3 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      There are many great things out there. Grab for all the gusto that you can get. Eventually your name will be remembered by all those editors that rejected you. Then they will be kicking themselves in the butt for what you are doing now. There more that your name is out there, the more in demand you will be.

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      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Deb, we have only just begun. There are big things on the horizon for both of us, and I just have the feeling that 2014 will be our year. Thank you for your continued support.

    • Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

      Glimmer Twin Fan 3 years ago

      I'm not sure if I consider myself a freelance writer, but I like writing what I do. I love your point of considering it a business. I think that is where I fall down, but hey, I'm having fun. One thing I do regret here on hubpages is not using my real name when I started. Too bad I can't go back and change them and I think that would give my articles an added element of legitimacy (that might not be the right word).

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      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Glimmer, I agree with you completely. That is my biggest regret as well, but it's a mistake I can't take back. I just need to move forward and make it work. I'm glad you are here and I'm glad you are having fun. Thanks for your thoughts.

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      Michele Kelsey 3 years ago from Edmond, Oklahoma

      I have lots of notes on this one, but since I am a newbie writer, I am not familiar with many of the industry terms. The writer's dictionary hubs you have will probably help me there. I wouldn't know where to start in trying to write for another platform. HubPages is the only site I have written on. I need to learn more about your other suggestions.

      One thing I really like is that you have a writing schedule and stick to it. I would really like that. I admire your index cards on your computer stating your goals. I would like to work toward a schedule, goals, and a business plan. Right now, I feel like you did for a year - just writing random articles here and there without a focus. I'd like that to change.

      If you can share, what kind of schedule do you have? How do you keep it? I tried for a while to have a mini-schedule where I did some social media stuff on certain days, wrote x amount of articles per week, and tweaked x amount of articles per week, but as you said, that plan wasn't panning out for me, so I am ready to change strategies. Just not sure where to begin yet.

      Michele :)

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      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Michele, email me when you get the chance and I will answer your questions. I don't know how much time you have to devote to this or what your goals are. I start at seven and finish around four each day....but then I don't have little kids or another job, so I have more freedom than others do. What kind of schedule can you live with and how badly do you want it? :)

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      PlainGraces 2 years ago from Nebraska

      I appreciate finding this article- thank you for the wonderful advice and lovely snowy path photo!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Nicole, I'm very glad this helped. Thank you for taking the time to comment.

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