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Children of Nazis Book Review

Updated on September 15, 2019

About the book

Published: 2018

Publisher: Arcade Publishing

Pages: 264

Author: Tania Crasnianski

Molly Grogan: Translator


The Book

Children of Nazi's tells us about the children of some of the highest ranking and most dangerous men in the Nazi Party. Children ranging from from ages 4 to about 10 yrs old were totally innocent at the time and had no idea of what was going on around them. But they would grow up to learn who their Fathers really were and the roles they played in the Nazi Party.

The book covers 8 of the most senior people in the Nazi Party. They are:

  • Heinrich Himmler
  • Rudolf Hess
  • Hermann Goring
  • Hans Frank
  • Martin Bormann
  • Rudolf Hoss
  • Albert Speer
  • Josef Mengele

Author Tania Crasnianski goes into great detail about the families of these men and what family life was like for these children. Each chapter tells us what each of these men in the Third Reich did and were responsible during WW2 and their role in the Concentration Camps. Some of these men had quite a lot of children. For instance, Rudolf Hoss had 5 children, so the book will focus on 1 of the children, in this instance, Wolf Hoss. It tells you how life was like for him, and the rest of the siblings during the war and how they grew up knowing what their father was responsible for. Up to the publication of the book, it also tells you what became of the children into adulthood with their lives and how they coped knowing what their Father did.

The book not just covers the children, but the wives of these men too. Maybe they didn't know the extent to what their husbands did in the Third Reich, or chose not to know. But either way, they chose to stand by their husbands. There are times when we learn that some of them even go into the concentration camps to buy jewels and other belongings that were stolen from the Jews.

As the little children grew up and subsequently learned the full reality of their fathers roles in the Nazi Party, they either accepted this fact and cut all ties with their father, or they defended them and even try to clear their names. Of course, after the war there was the Nuremberg Trials, so we learn how the children and wives dealt with all this going on.

Source

My Thoughts

I found this book to be an insightful and sobering book to read. What I think the author has succeeded in doing in telling us about the personal lives of some of these children without passing any personal judgement herself. She leaves it down to us, the reader, to decide for ourselves how we feel. What I found particularly fascinating about the book was how some of these children grew up, some of them defending their fathers and some wanting nothing more to do with them.

The men focused in this book are now written in the history books as some of the most evil men to walk Gods green earth. But personally, I never really gave it much thought to their families or offspring. This is an enlightening look at how the families of these men suffered in one way or another, and how they dealt with this. Families were torn apart with some of the wives of these men were arrested and questioned. I found it sad that some of these children were even denied school places simply because of who their fathers were.

Although a sobering and thoughtful book to read, it must have been even more sobering to write. The author researched this book well and tells us not just what life was life for the children during the war, but what became of them as adults. I found it intriguing how these men at home seemed to be loving, caring husbands and fathers. But when they crossed that line at work, they became these ruthless killers. Some of these children had trouble coming to terms with the roles their parents played in the Third Reich, others chose to embrace it and carry on their fathers legacy in one way or another.

© 2019 Louise Powles

Comments

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    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 

      2 weeks ago from USA

      What a great concept for a book. Some people are better able to compartmentalize their feelings than others. This is a true test of what "unconditional" means. How terrible to be faced with the dilemma.

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Weithers 

      4 weeks ago from The Caribbean

      Thanks for the review. This is an interesting topic although we do not readily think about it. After the fact, it opens up our minds to compassion to these women and children. This book will undoubtedly be a good read.

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 

      5 weeks ago from British Columbia, Canada

      This sounds like an interesting book. It covers a sad topic, but it sounds as though it's important and definitely worth reading.

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 

      5 weeks ago from England

      Wow, I had never thought of the children before! Of course they had families. I believe they were all guilty, but maybe I need to read the book, lol! Thanks for a great review.

    • Senoritaa profile image

      Rinita Sen 

      5 weeks ago

      Sounds like an interesting book. It is true that I never thought of the families that these so-called evil men left behind. It is also worth noting that the author does not pass any judgement. Who are we, even as readers, to judge, after all? Only they know what it was really like to be sons and daughters of such frightening men. Thank you for this Hub.

    • Eurofile profile image

      Liz Westwood 

      5 weeks ago from UK

      This is well-reviewed. It sounds like an interesting read. I was recently recommended 'The Lost Boys' by Catherine Bailey, which traces how children of those who plotted to assasinate Hitler were separated from their family and later reunited after the war had ended.

    • lambservant profile image

      Lori Colbo 

      5 weeks ago from Pacific Northwest

      How awful to learn of the evil of their fathers. Great book review.

    • Cheryl E Preston profile image

      Cheryl E Preston 

      5 weeks ago from Roanoke

      Thank you for this review. I found it enlightening and I got.

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