ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel
  • »
  • Books, Literature, and Writing»
  • Commercial & Creative Writing

Coming of Age: A Writing Exercise

Updated on July 29, 2015

New Book Ideas

I always have new ideas for future books. The trick is to turn future into present. Time is always the deciding factor. I’ve got the motivation. I’m got the desire and the work ethic. I’m just short on time and no matter how hard I try, I cannot seem to add hours to a standard day.

Damn!

Of course, that is partially b.s. as well. I have time for other writing and I choose to do that. So maybe there isn’t a problem after all. I have made my choices so I live with them.

My normal procedure when I get one of these ideas is to write an introductory chapter, save it as a Word document, and then let it ferment in my brain for awhile. When I have time…if I have time…if I make time….I return to it and see where it will go.

I thought I’d share one with you. It’s obviously not finished. I have no idea if it ever will be. Right now it’s just a young newborn colt trying to get its legs under it. Standing up unaided would be quite an accomplishment for this colt at this time.

Anyway, enjoy! If you’re looking for an ending you’ll be sadly disappointed.

Our home in 1961
Our home in 1961 | Source

Nineteen Sixty-one

Tacoma, Washington was a city waiting for change in 1961. Most people who lived there at that time could not give voice to what they were feeling. It was a rumbly in the tumbly as our friend Pooh would say, a sense that something was about to happen, but whether it was good or bad they could not say.

At that time, in that year, Tacoma was the plain girl sitting in the corner of the gymnasium at a high school dance, resigned to being the perennial wallflower, somewhat satisfied with her life to date and more than a little apprehensive about her life to come.

The city’s history was a mixed bag of good and bad news. By 1961 it was tired and in need of rejuvenation, in need of vitalization and in need of shaking up. Again, it’s doubtful the citizens would have said that. They were locked into the business of living, the day in, day out grind of rise and shine, tote that barge and lift that bale, all the while tending to families and mending white picket fences. The Fifties of Ike and Mamie were gone. The logging industry was drying up, as was the smelting industry, the fishing industry and any other industry cemented in the stale past. The population had flat-lined, the downtown core was looking a bit dreary, and there was an ever-present smell of decay.

Still, there was hope. A new couple occupied the large white house on Pennsylvania Avenue three-thousand miles away, and Ike and Mamie they were not. They brought youth to the color screens of American televisions, and they seemed to symbolize the change so desperately needed. Threats, some real and some imagined, rose in the distance like storm clouds over the Pacific, and school children practiced duck and cover, but for the average Tacoman, life just plodded on. Barbecues were held, church was attended, family gatherings were dutifully attended and stories, some truth and some pure bullshit, were passed down from one generation to the next.

I turned thirteen years of age the year Tacoma turned eighty-six. I doubt either of us will forget that particular birthday year. It was a coming of age.

A Hot Summer

Looking back now, several things are burned in my memory. It was a hot summer by Tacoma standards. In July it hit ninety-nine degrees. That’s a scorcher for us weather-pampered Northwesterners. August seemed to be in the eighties daily. Great baseball weather and we all loved baseball.

The other thing I remember clearly is all the roadwork and public utility work that was done that summer. Huge trenches were dug to lay new pipe. Dust seemed to cling in the air for three solid months. It was a traffic nightmare for drivers. It was a playground for us kids.

It was the summer Karl and his family moved into our neighborhood. He and I became instant friends.

The author just prior to that summer
The author just prior to that summer | Source

August 11th

A knock on the front door. I answered and found Karl grinning at me.

“Let’s call some guys and go play ball at the park,” he said to me.

I grabbed my glove, bat and ball, told my mom where I was going, and walked with Karl the block to his house. Our phone calls netted five more players, all of whom promised to meet us at the park in a half-hour. Jefferson Park was a mile down the road, a straight shot down Monroe Street. Our Keds sneakers kicked up dust as we walked. Ten a.m. and already hotter than Hades.

I picked up a clump of dirt and tossed it at Karl. “Spahn goes for three-hundred today,” I told him.

“He’ll get it. Nobody can hit that curve of his. Sure wish I could be there to see it.”

Karl had three sisters. One of them, Eva, had just turned twelve. Blonde hair, blue eyes, damn cute and I had a crush on her. “What are your sisters doing today?”

“You mean what’s Eva doing, right? Why don’t you ask her yourself? You chicken?” He nailed me with a dirt clump and ran ahead.

Truth was, Karl was right. I was chicken. Girls confused me back then. Eva was way too pretty….pretty in an intimidating way…and I had no clue. Talking to her was painful. The thought of doing anything other than talk was way beyond my comprehension. Still I had my image to uphold.

“Nah, I’m not chicken. She’s too young and besides, girls are a pain in the butt. Why bother, right?”

Karl wasn’t buying it but he let it drop. Friends were like that back then. They knew just how far to push and then they backed off. Kidding around was fine but there were limits. He gratefully changed the subject back to safer ground.

“Do you think Maris can beat Ruth’s record? He’s got forty-eight now. Only thirteen to go.”

I was shaking my head. “No way, Jose. He’s going to choke big time. You just watch and see. Hey, did you see the bomb shelter the Peterman’s are building in their backyard? I’d hate to have to live in that tiny room underground for a month until it was safe outside.”

“Are you kidding me? Lisa Peterman is a good looking girl. That would be the greatest month of my life. If the bomb drops I’m running to their house and begging them to let me stay with them.”

We laughed the rest of the way to the park. When we got there the other guys were waiting for us. We played a game of Pick-up for three hours, the heat forgotten as we ran the bases with reckless abandon, just kids being kids, testing our own limits and learning about ourselves along the way.

And there was so much learning to do.

Ann Marie Burr
Ann Marie Burr

AUGUST 31st

I woke up early that morning. A thunderstorm the night before made sleep restless at best. By seven I was dressed and eating breakfast. There were three more days of summer vacation and I was determined to make the most of them. I told my mom Karl and I were going for a bike ride, took my Schwinn out of the garage, met Karl at his house and then we pedaled off for a new adventure. I had to be back home by three to mow the lawn. Dad got home at five and there would be hell to pay if that lawn wasn’t mowed, but that still gave us seven hours to explore.

There was no micro-parenting back in those days. Parents thought nothing of their children going on bike rides to the far corners of the city. That day we rode to Point Defiance, a large park seven miles from our homes. We had lunch there, played on the beach, tossed rocks in the water, looked at the older girls in their bathing suits, and then decided to go check out the college and watch the coeds moving into their dorm rooms. Summers were for girl-watching and we were very willing participants.

The Puget Sound College was located in the north end of Tacoma, surrounded by a residential neighborhood of working-class people. Tall evergreens stood guard throughout the campus and provided shade on that warm day. Karl and I parked under one of those trees, leaned up against the trunk and watched the lovelies as they moved furniture and other belongings into Adams Hall.

“I can hardly wait for college,” Karl said as one beautiful blond after another paraded in front of us.

“Heck, Karl, you’ll have to pass high school first, and with your grades all bets are off.” I punched him on the shoulder to let him know I was kidding. “I don’t know, buddy. It all kind of scares me. Things are changing too fast, you know? Nuclear bombs are being tested. That’s scary stuff, man. And have you ever heard of a country called Vietnam?” He shook his head. “Well my dad says there’s going to be trouble over there. I guess President Kennedy is thinking of sending troops over there. I don’t even know where it is, but my dad says no sweat, we’ll kick their butts, but I don’t know. Seems like all we hear about is war or the chance of war. And I heard that somewhere down south there’s trouble starting up over Negroes not getting the same rights as whites.”

“You mean they don’t already? Hey, it’s weird, you know, but I never see any Negroes in our neighborhood. Why is that do you suppose?”

It was one of many mysteries that summer in Tacoma.

On the way home we were riding hard down 14th Street when we came upon several police cars parked in front of a home. There had to be at least ten police officers standing on the lawn of the brick house, and another twenty neighbors standing nearby. We pulled to the curb and stood looking at the action. After about ten minutes we spotted another friend of ours, Pete Vinich, so we went over to him and asked him what was happening.

“Some little girl went missing. Her mom woke up this morning and the girl was gone.”

“What was her name?” I asked Pete.

“Ann Marie Burr. My mom knows her mom so that’s how I found out. She just vanished. Went to bed in her upstairs bedroom last night and this morning she was gone. Nobody heard or saw anything.”

“That’s freaky,” I said. “Come on, Karl, I’ve got to get back home. Good seeing ya, Pete. See you at school on Monday.”

When I got home I told my mom about Ann Marie.

“Oh my goodness! I know her mother from church. Oh, those poor people. They must be worried sick. What in the world is happening? Who would do such a thing? I better cook a casserole for the Burrs and take it to them. You mow the lawn, Bill. I’m going to make them a meal and then go to the church and light a candle for that little girl.”

The late summer turned cold in the following weeks. The evenings were considerably cooler. The trees changed colors earlier than normal. Nature imitated life as change spread its shroud upon us.

A memorial for Ann Marie Burr
A memorial for Ann Marie Burr | Source

Thanks for Reading

The fermentation process has begun. What will happen to this story is anyone’s guess at this point. It might take wings and fly. It might die a natural death of disinterest. We’ll just have to see what transpires.

For those of you who aren’t aware, this is based on a true story. On the night of August 31, 1961, Ann Marie Burr was kidnapped from her bedroom in Tacoma, Washington. She was never found. It has long been believed that she was the first victim of serial killer Ted Bundy who was a 14-year old paperboy in that area at that time.

It should also be noted that this is a “bare bones” first chapter. There are no character or scene developments here. This is how I write my first drafts. The storyline takes center stage in first drafts for me; in-depth development follows in the second draft. The first decision I’ll have to make is whether this will be fiction or a memoir. If fiction, I’ll need to change Ann Marie Burr’s name, obviously, but that’s a decision that will come at another time.

2015 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Janine Huldie profile image

      Janine Huldie 24 months ago from New York, New York

      Wow, Bill this is some story and seriously do hope you develop it as I would love to read your fictional insight more on this. Thanks for sharing and Happy Hump Day now ;)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Janine. If I can figure out how to add more hours to the day, maybe this intro will grow. Happy Wednesday to you, too.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 24 months ago from USA

      I say change Anne Marie's name so you can really have creative license.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Flourish. That's the way I'm leaning as well.

    • tillsontitan profile image

      Mary Craig 24 months ago from New York

      What a great start! It seems to be a finished draft waiting for an ending. You certainly give us a lay of the land and the boys are as real as real can be. Oh, I know they need more description and probably a touch of depth, but as I reader, it's fine to me right now! (Of course I do recognize the main character, but that is what it's all about!)

      Thanks for sharing and showing us how a story can begin to be written.

      Voted up, useful, awesome, and interesting.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Mary. If I go ahead with this, that one chapter most likely will be four or five chapters. I just wanted to show my process.

    • mary615 profile image

      Mary Hyatt 24 months ago from Florida

      Sounds to me you are off to a good start! A story has to begin somewhere, right? It's getting the start that is hard for me.

    • Froggy213 profile image

      Greg Boudonck 24 months ago from On A Mountain In Puerto Rico

      Bill, I really like the beginning of this. I believe you are on to something. Keep it going my friend.

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 24 months ago from Central Florida

      Bill, this is a great beginning. You had me glued.

      I'd like to see this as a memoir. You lived near Ted Bundy when he lived in Tacoma. In fact, he was your paperboy! As you have done in this first chapter, you knew the "climate" of Tacoma. You knew the neighbors, lived the life - and never knew danger lurked as closely as it did. Quite chilling when you think about it.

      I would venture to say not many people who knew Bundy as a kid - or knew of him - have penned their perspectives. The way you can spin a tale and bring forth emotion through your words make you the perfect candidate to bring the horror of Ted Bundy to a level researchers can never pull off.

      I say go for it and go big. In memoir format I'll bet your efforts would be snatched up by an agent or publisher in a heartbeat. Enough time has gone by now that the subject of Ted Bundy isn't being over-saturated. Your "insider" perspective could very well be a best seller.

    • MarleneB profile image

      Marlene Bertrand 24 months ago from Northern California, USA

      I absolutely enjoyed reading this story. It did feel like a memoir and I do hope you are able to find some extra time to finish it. And, Bill, if you do happen to stumble upon some extra time, I'd be grateful if you could break me off a piece of that time. A minute or two... anything you could spare would be fine. I have a few projects I would love to finish. I just need the extra time to do it. :)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Mary. I'm glad you enjoyed it.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Greg. Now it's just a matter of finding the time.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Sha! It's a fascinating story and I do think it would be an interesting read. Now I have to make the time to continue. I appreciate your input.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Marlene. Time seems to be a big issue for us all. I sure wish I would have started writing a little sooner in life. :) My goodness, I could have ten books written by now...at least. :)

    • always exploring profile image

      Ruby Jean Fuller 24 months ago from Southern Illinois

      I didn't want this story to end. The name Ted Bundy is as bad as the name Hitler. I remember the times clearly. I enjoyed your walk down memory lane, such innocent times for a kid.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Ruby! The story hasn't ended...it just needs an infusion of extra time. :)

    • Venkatachari M profile image

      Venkatachari M 24 months ago from Hyderabad, India

      Wow! It's so interesting and exciting. A great story plot. I would like to see it's full version soon.

      Thanks for sharing it. Voted up and awesome.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Venkatachari M. I always appreciate your visits and kind words.

    • rdsparrowriter profile image

      rdsparrowriter 24 months ago

      Interestng :)

    • Larry Rankin profile image

      Larry Rankin 24 months ago from Oklahoma

      My problem is I have more ideas than time to execute them. Every time I get a promising idea, I type it out in my iPhone notes. The result is a long list of ideas I can't find the time to get to.

      Interesting hub.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Sparrow!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Larry, I need about twenty more years...and when I have them I'll need another twenty. :) Thanks for stopping by.

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 24 months ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      Well I am no one to make literary comment as I know the setting, the author, the narrator and the case of Marie Burr. I look forward to reading more. I like it when I am instantly all cozy with a story.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Eric. I look forward to reading more of this too. :) when that will be is anyone's guess.

    • Homeplace Series profile image

      William Leverne Smith 24 months ago from Hollister, MO

      There you go, again. Getting us all excited about 'possibilities.' THANKS! ;-)

    • Buildreps profile image

      Buildreps 24 months ago from Europe

      It looks like this can be an interesting book. I'm personally no reader of thrillers. You've a great platform where you can test your ideas, Bill!

    • MizBejabbers profile image

      MizBejabbers 24 months ago

      I was really taken by this, Bill. In fact so much so that I forgot that you said it had no ending. I hope you write a book about this. This one I would read because it doesn't hit at my bad memories like one of yours one did.

      By the way, I still plan on being in Seattle next Monday the 3rd and fly back on Friday, if you and Bev can spare some time, maybe we can have lunch or dinner.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      I'm just a big tease, Bill. :) Thanks for putting up with me.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      I do for sure, Buildreps. Just one more reason why I love HP. Thank you!

    • profile image

      DJ Anderson 24 months ago

      Great beginning to a super story.

      My friend's niece was murdered at a rest stop around Atlanta, in early 1978. The family always felt like Ted Bundy had been her murderer.

      As time went on and facts were revealed about Ted's travels around the country, the time matched up where he would have been driving from

      Ann Arbor to Atlanta. She had been taken down into the woods behind the rest stop. But, Ted never admitted to the murder.

      Ann Rule's book is a gripping novel. There is no doubt that you can write one better.

      For your own sanity, stay away from non-fictional writings. It can make a serial killer out of you. I should know as I have three muses buried in the back yard along with one dead rat and a computer that committed

      suicide when it leaped out the second floor window. Yes, I was home.

      No, there were no witnesses. We'll just leave it at that.

      My best to you this Wednesday,

      DJ.

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 24 months ago

      Ah, no fair, Bill. You gave us just enough to draw us in and left us hanging. I was all settled in with my cup of tea too! I will look forward to reading more.

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 24 months ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      It has been a while since I commented on many hubs. I am glad to have stopped by. Awesome ideas from you.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      MizB, I'm so glad you enjoyed this. I would love to make it a book, but time is always a factor. As for the visit. I'm afraid it's not going to work out. Midweek is tough for us. Bev has a full-time job and is dead tired until Saturday. I'm sorry to say we won't be able to make it up north.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      DJ, thank you my friend. Better than Rules? Somehow I doubt it, but I appreciate it all the same. As for those three muses buried out back, my best suggestion is to plant a big old bush there. Hides the evidence perfectly. :)

      Happy Wednesday, my friend.

      Bill

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      I'm sorry Dianna. I'm afraid this one will remain a tease for quite some time. Thanks for allowing me to tease you, though. :)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      DDE, it's always a pleasure having you stop by. Thank you!

    • Carb Diva profile image

      Linda Lum 24 months ago from Washington State, USA

      Bill, I remember that day so very well. I remember seeing the stories in the newspaper and it scared me spitless, thinking that I might be next. How odd that you resurrected this now--you are away that Ann Rule died just this past weekend, aren't you?

      Listen to Flourish and Bravewarrior. Change a few names, let your imagination run, and solve this mystery for us.

    • profile image

      Ruchira Khanna 24 months ago

      I remember you mentioning about this kidnapping in one of your earlier hubs, and it gave a lot of hits :)

      So, you should pursue this story into a fiction novel, Bill

      Good luck!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Linda, I hadn't heard about Rule's death. I wrote this a couple weeks ago when I was thinking about the introduction to "To Kill A Mockingbird." Anyway, I would love to finish this...some day.

      Thank you my friend.

      bill

    • cam8510 profile image

      Chris Mills 24 months ago from St. Louis, MO until the end of June, 2017

      It's good to see how you work, Bill. My effort at writing a novel wore me out. I suppose it was because I was attempting to write final draft chapters on the first pass. When I get back to that project, I'll have to rethink my strategy. Your description of writing a first draft with the storyline taking center stage is good for me to hear. Thanks for putting this up. It's a good start to an interesting story.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Ruchira. I'm considering it for sure.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Chris. If it helped you then great. I think writers can learn quite a bit from fellow writers if, like you, they are willing.

    • drbj profile image

      drbj and sherry 24 months ago from south Florida

      What a heck of a beginning, Bill. I promise to wait for the rest of this exciting story that I know will come one day. You surpassed my expectations with this one and that does not happen every day.

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 24 months ago from southern USA

      Thank you for sharing here, dear Bill. Now, you have me thinking about our hometown serial killer from the 70s, "The Stocking Strangler" but there is already a book about it, "Murder in the Peach State", I believe is the title of it. They are not sure if they have the right guy after all of this time! I can certainly write it from my own perspective in living there at that time, and my fellow co-worker at the A & P, who the police questioned! I was only 17/18 at the time. Then we had another murder too, but they caught him right away and what is so frightening, poor Truly Johnson, could have been me, as I walked home right past the killer's family fabric store, where he would stand outside and smile as I walked past with my long hair (just like Truly's). I remember thinking he was so handsome with a gorgeous smile ... creeps me out now to think about it!

      Thanks for the inspiring. Peace and blessings

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 24 months ago from SW England

      A useful example of your writing process. I tend to scribble down everything I think of before sorting it all out and embellishing.

      I think it would be good in either form but a memoir makes more impact with something like this; it happened, what was life like then?, what were people's reactions?...etc, etc. On the other hand, with fiction you can develop it how you like, add other events, solve the crime; either way, with you writing it, I know it'll be a good'n.

      Great insight into your process, bill, and a useful exercise for any writer.

      A thrilling Thursday to you and yours!

      Ann

    • breakfastpop profile image

      breakfastpop 24 months ago

      I want more, because when you write I always want more.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you so much, drbj! I aim to please. :)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Faith, you have every reason to be creeped out. They are among us and we can't spot them...and it is very, very scary. Thanks for sharing that...I'm glad it wasn't you. I would have lost out on a wonderful friendship.

      blessings and hugs

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Ann! I haven't decided yet which genre to do...if I do it...and that's a mighty big if. :)

      Hot again here...hottest summer on record. I'm tired of it. :) Whine, whine, whine!

      Have a super day!

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Awww, thanks Pop! Maybe one day you'll get your wish.

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Isaac Weithers 24 months ago from The Caribbean

      Bill, believe it or not, this is just what I need--a look at a first chapter by an experienced writer. I think that including the details of real life events lends to the authenticity of other details. Thank you!

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 24 months ago from Queensland Australia

      I enjoyed reading this teaser of a story Bill. You could go either way with it, fiction or memoir and make it work well. My preference would probably be memoir because the characters already exist as does the events so it's easier and the way you write about your childhood is very engaging. Ted Bundy was a big name and would still be a reader draw are so you may as well take advantage of that. Whatever you choose though, good luck.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Dora, I'm glad you found this useful. Thank you so much and have a wonderful weekend ahead.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks John. I'm still not sure which direction I'll take or if I even take a direction. :) time will tell.

    • PAINTDRIPS profile image

      Denise McGill 24 months ago from Fresno CA

      Positively gripping. I loved it. I have thought about writing a similar story about the boy kidnapped in my childhood neighborhood, Steven Stayner. Maybe this is just the boost I need to get going on it. Thanks for the look inside. I love the way you made the city a little wallflower at a dance. Lovely imagery.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Paintdrips. I hope you write that story. I hope I finish this one. :)

    • MartieCoetser profile image

      Martie Coetser 24 months ago from South Africa

      This exercise has a lot of potential, billybuc. I hope you find time to turn it into a novel :)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Martie. As with all other things, the choice is mine. :)

    • bdegiulio profile image

      Bill De Giulio 24 months ago from Massachusetts

      This is a great start Bill. I really admire your ability. To sit and just pump this out quickly is a talent. Hope you develop it. I certainly remember Ted Bundy but did not know that he may have committed his first murder at the age of 14. This would make for a great read.

    • old albion profile image

      Graham Lee 24 months ago from Lancashire. England.

      Hi Bill. A terrific start to this story. I knew of Bundy even from over here and your story really comes to life. Thanks for the info and as usual. Tip Top.

      Graham.

    • Frank Atanacio profile image

      Frank Atanacio 24 months ago from Shelton

      I like the development... I can learn from something as simplistic as this hub to write my real first novel.. just follow the game plan.. thank you Billybuc for this insight.. bravo.. hope something is produced that will soar... bless you

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Bill. For some reason, introductions come easy to me. Now the work begins.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Good to see you, Graham. Thank you my friend. I hope you have some summer soon in the UK.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Frank. Maybe when I finish my current novel I'll give this a go. We'll see.

    • Vellur profile image

      Nithya Venkat 24 months ago from Dubai

      This is a great story and it has drawn me in wondering what events will unfold in the chapters to come. This will be a great novel, all the very best.

    • suraj punjabi profile image

      suraj punjabi 24 months ago from jakarta

      You call that a young colt trying to get its legs under it??? I call that a stallion!!! That was superb. Ferment it, Bill...ferment it good!!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Vellur. I hope I find the time to continue with it. I appreciate your feedback.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank yo u Suraj! I will try my best and I appreciate your kind words.

    • phoenix2327 profile image

      Zulma Burgos-Dudgeon 24 months ago from United Kingdom

      It's a good start, Bill. Yes, just let it simmer a bit, maybe a bit of seasoning and you'll be on to something. I'll be waiting to see what you'll eventually serve up. Have a great Sunday.

    • Nadine May profile image

      Nadine May 24 months ago from Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa

      I can relate to your writing a kind of draft, but to write through the eyes of a 13 to 14 year old is very tricky unless you are surrounded by children of that age. That is just me. This kind of story could become a detective novel if you would make the main character an adult, like a detective or a private eye and let him speak, but then a lot of research have to be done, and you never know what the result would be. By your very focus and intent you may attract the true story behind the missing girl towards you! It has happened before.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Zulma, it will simmer now for about six months. I have to finish my current project first and then I'll get started on this in earnest. Thank you and I hope your weekend was a good one.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks for your thoughts, Nadine. You are correct, writing like a 13 year old is difficult at best...but hey, Harper Lee did it, so I'm ready for the challenge.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image

      Shyron E Shenko 24 months ago from Texas

      Wow! Bill this is interesting and I would like very much for you to write more about this. Have you done any research on what happened to Ann Marie, did other girls go missing in Tacoma at that time? Did you know Ted Bundy? Do you remember seeing him?

      Thumb-up, UABI and shared

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 24 months ago from Stillwater, OK

      This is good. I knew what you were up to with it the minute I began reading it. Don't stick this on the shelf for too long, as you have a winner here.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Shyron, he was our paperboy at that time. Weird to say the least. I don't think other girls went missing at that time; I'm sure it would have been a big deal because Ann Marie's disappearance was definitely a big deal.

      Thank you for always being here. I plan on writing this book; the big question is when?

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Deb! I will take your counsel under advisement.

    • Genna East profile image

      Genna East 24 months ago from Massachusetts, USA

      "At that time, in that year, Tacoma was the plain girl sitting in the corner of the gymnasium at a high school dance, resigned to being the perennial wallflower, somewhat satisfied with her life to date and more than a little apprehensive about her life to come." What a great metaphor that introduces us to what we already knew: This man can write! You take us there, to those streets of Tacoma in 1961, in every moment of its character; its carefree days of youth, with something, unknowing yet restless in the wind, that was about to change... I'm already hooked on this story, and selfishly look forward to more, more, more. :-)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 24 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Awww, thank you Genna. This one could become very personal and I want to take my time on it...so I'm afraid your wait might be awhile. :) But thank you so much for your kind words.

    • Mr Archer profile image

      Mr Archer 23 months ago from Missouri

      Bill, your work here grabbed me and pulled me along as few of my latest attempts at reading books have. I was sorry to see it end; is this factual in that you were there at the time? Man, how crazy that must have been. Keep this going please and I am ready for more!!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 23 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Mike, it is factual. Ted Bundy was our paperboy and the disappearance happened four blocks from our home. I will continue it at some date, good Lord willin' and the creek don't rise. :) Thank you my friend.

    • B. Leekley profile image

      Brian Leekley 23 months ago from Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA

      If you choose fiction, you have the gamut of possibilities from flash fiction to novel-length to consider. I wonder what your logline will be.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 23 months ago from Olympia, WA

      You and me both, Brian. Stay tuned!

      Thank you and have a wonderful weekend.

    • ShyeAnne profile image

      ShyeAnne 23 months ago from Deep Bay, British Columbia, Canada

      Good you can call yourself out on the 'no time to write ' stuff! I say change the name for creative license and write the story. Do you remember what happened to James Frey when he marketed his book A Million Little Pieces as a memoir? I felt bad for him and his was an incredible story to tell. I'd read your book !

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 23 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you ShyeAnne. I think yours is a good suggestion and it's probably the route I'll take. Again, thank you.

    • Babbyii profile image

      Barb Johnson 23 months ago from Alaska's Kenai Peninsula

      A magnificent start Bill. Don't limit yourself though. It's already ripe for development....when you get (make) the time. I suspect that when it's time, the details will begin to dog your thoughts until you start writing. lol. Thanks for the teaser mystery!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 23 months ago from Olympia, WA

      I will definitely finish it one day, Babby. It's calling to me, and I know you understand that. Thank you!

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 23 months ago from sunny Florida

      Good morning, Bill

      When I read many of your writings, I can see myself right back in time...many of my experiences paralleled yours (even though there are obvious differences--location, gender for example).

      It was a different time then. And frightening things happened in our neck of the woods too. Ted Bundy came to Florida too ....much later....and even though I have mixed feelings about the death penalty, I was not sad the day he was put to death in Starke, a few miles north of here.

      You would do well to continue this Bill...there are many of us who can so closely identify with the times that you share here. Wanting to hear more...

      Angels and blessings and hugs are on the way this new week.... ps

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 23 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you PS! I'm working on it. The story is writing itself and I always try to listen to my muse. I'm so glad you found it interesting.

      blessings and hugs heading your way

      bill

    • peachpurple profile image

      peachy 22 months ago from Home Sweet Home

      i really love reading your article, you can turn a simple truestory into a drama

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 22 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Peach. I'm very happy you enjoyed this.

    • swalia profile image

      Shaloo Walia 18 months ago

      I enjoyed reading this! And thanks for sharing your creative process :)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 18 months ago from Olympia, WA

      You are very welcome, Swalia...thank you!

    Click to Rate This Article