ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel
  • »
  • Books, Literature, and Writing»
  • Commercial & Creative Writing

Commonly Misused English Words

Updated on April 6, 2015

English can be a tough language to get one’s head around, especially for those for whom English is a second language. However, even for native English speakers, written English in particular can be tricky and confusing. When I read the works of some over here, or when I see articles and forum discussions on the Internet, I come across a lot of words that are misused – as in they think they are using the right word, when in fact they are using a similar word which means something very different from the meaning they had intended to convey. The Internet is replete with such misused words. As an author, it is imperative that your work has credibility and knowing what these common errors are can make your articles more professional and credible. So, what are these common English mistakes that people make? Let’s discuss a few of them below!!

Source

Common English Error # 1: Advice versus Advise


advice (noun) - advice with the "c" is the noun - which means a recommendation or counsel.

Example: I was happy to offer advice.

advise (verb) - advise with the "s" is the verb - which means an advice or counsel that you are giving someone.

Example: I advised him to plead guilty.

HINT: You give or ask someone for advice. You advise someone on a course of action.


Common English Error # 2: Loose versus Lose


loose (adjective) -- not rigidly fastened or securely attached.

lose (verb) -- to miss from one's possession or customary place; to fail to keep

HINT: If you lose a few pounds your jeans might be loose.


Common English Error # 3: Accept versus Except


accept (verb) -- to receive willingly ; to give admittance or approval to

Example: I accept my shortcomings.

except (conjunction/preposition) -- with the exclusion or exception of

Example: I like that dress except for the trim.


Common English Error # 4: Effect versus Affect


affect - to have an influence on or effect a change in

Example: How does global warming affect humans?

effect - something brought about by a cause or agent; a result.

Example: The effect of global warming on the environment is a matter of concern.


Common English Error # 5: Complement versus Compliment


Complement: Something that fills up, completes or makes perfect.

Example: These two colors complement each other very well.

Compliment: An expression of courtesy; a flattering remark

Example: That was the sweetest compliment ever!


Common English Error # 6: ELICIT versus ILLICIT


Elicit - means to draw forth or bring out

Example: The persistent questioning elicited the truth from the convict.

Illicit - means something unlawful / not permitted

Example: He takes no illicit drugs.


Common English Error # 7: Stationary versus Stationery


stationary - fixed in position ; immobile

Example: The accident victim was told to keep his arm stationary until help arrived.

stationery - writing materials such as paper, pens and ink

Example: The letter was written on stationery that had an emblem on it.


Common English Error # 8: Aid versus Aide


aid – help (to provide with something useful, or to give assistance)


aide – helper (a person who gives assistance, or acts as an assistant)

HINT: With the “e” at the end is the person.


Common English Error # 9: Maybe versus May be


maybe – perhaps or possibly (as in something might happen)

Example: Maybe you will win the lottery some day. (can substitute ‘maybe’ with ‘perhaps’)

may be – has the ability to happen (as in implies something can happen)

Example: She may be in distress.


Common English Error # 10: Every day versus everyday


every day – means each day individually

Example: The school is open every day except Sunday.

everyday – (acts as an adjective) --- means: frequent or often

Example: Fireworks are not an everyday event.


Common English Error # 11: already versus all ready


already – previously / ‘by a specified time’

Example: By the time I arrived, he was already there.

all ready – each individual is ready (or all set)

Example: We are all ready for our French exam.


Common English Error # 12: principal versus principle


principal (noun/adjective) --- means highest in rank / main / chief, etc. Usually referenced in regards to the ‘principal of the school’ or in cases where a chief reason is being attributed to.

Example: principal cause of the ……..

principle (noun) --- means a basic truth, rule or a method

Example: He is a man of principle. OR The principles of physics.


Common English Error # 13: some time versus sometime


some time - an extended period of time

Example: I will make some time to see you.

Here the word “time” acts as a noun and the word “some” acts as an adjective describing time.

sometime - at some unspecified point of time

Example: We lost touch sometime last year.

Sometime is an adverb telling when.

*******************************************

Well, these are just 13 of the most commonly misused English words. There are lots of other English words that confuse and confound native English speakers as well as those for whom English is a second language.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 4 years ago

      Misslong123, you are free to link to this article. I do mention this in my profile homepage - that anyone is free to link using the URL address, just that they don't copy contents and reproduce it on another page!!

      Thanks for the appreciation - I am glad you liked this article :)

    • misslong123 profile image

      Michele Kelsey 4 years ago from Edmond, Oklahoma

      This is a really awesome article. I'm working on a series that touches on grammar, but I have not included much on this information. Can I add your link to this page to mine? This should bring you some new traffic, and it will give my readers more grammar help. Michele

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 5 years ago

      Leni, thanks for stopping by and commenting. What can I say, except that I am honored that you considered this hub worthy enough to bookmark. Glad that you enjoyed reading this hub! Thanks for your words of appreciation and the good stuff :)

    • leni sands profile image

      Leni Sands 5 years ago from UK

      ...what is left to say? Thoroughly enjoyed the hub, the comments and your responses. Bookmarked, voted up useful and interesting. Thank you

    • profile image

      Sue 5 years ago

      Inappropriate punctuation? How about incorrect punctuation? Why is the word "inappropriate" now a catch-all for: wrong, improper, misguided, offensive, insensitive, irresponsible and unsuitable. It's sad that Americans lack of a decent vocabulary include trendy words that are so overused.

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 6 years ago

      Thank you, toknowinfo, for stopping by and commenting. Glad you found this hub useful.

    • toknowinfo profile image

      toknowinfo 6 years ago

      Impressive hub. Glad you wrote this and brought to light so many common errors. Rated up and useful.

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 6 years ago

      Ian, thanks for the encouraging words. I need to find some peace and quiet to start working at that. Life has been hectic of late. I haven't been able to write any new hubs too. Let's see!!

      Thanks for coming back again and commenting, Ian. It is such a pleasure to have you around and read your wonderful comments.

    • Twilight Lawns profile image

      Twilight Lawns 6 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

      Shil, for someone who loves to use the English language so well, and has obviously devised this hub because she is annoyed by the misuse of English; it is only a hop step and a jump to write your own poetry. It takes a poetic mind to appreciate poetry, and you're halfway there.

      By the way, I am so pleased that I reread this hub; I had forgotten that my concepts of "compliment" and "complement" are shaky.

      Ian

    • Twilight Lawns profile image

      Twilight Lawns 6 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

      Wow! Great hub. I love the English language and hate to see or hear it being wrecked. When I am reading something and it's flowing well and beautifully organised, and even poetic, mu heart sinks when I read a Malapropism or I see incorrect punctuation, and I immediately think the writer has lost credibility in my mind.

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 6 years ago

      Thank you very much for your kind words, transcriptionven - glad you found this hub very useful :)

    • transcriptionven profile image

      transcriptionven 6 years ago from 821 N. Mantel Ln. Santa Ana, CA 92701

      There must be an option for very useful hub. Loved going through the content and lots of sincere appreciations for posting such a hub.

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 6 years ago

      Thank you, GW, for stopping by and commenting. Glad you found this hub useful :)

    • Gypsy Willow profile image

      Gypsy Willow 6 years ago from Lake Tahoe Nevada USA , Wales UK and Taupo New Zealand

      Useful reminder, thank you!

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 6 years ago

      Thank you, Rawle, for stopping by and commenting. Glad you found it helpful :)

    • profile image

      Rawle 6 years ago

      very informative ....Thanks was very helpful

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 6 years ago

      Thank you, Kotori, for stopping by and commenting. Glad you found this hub useful enough to consider using it in your classroom!!

    • Kotori profile image

      Kotori 6 years ago from Chicagoland

      Great hub. I might use this in my classroom.

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 6 years ago

      Glad you loved this hub, Rachel. I feel much the same when I see misused words. You find them being used all the time on the Internet especially. Thank you for stopping by and commenting!!

    • RachelClaire profile image

      RachelClaire 6 years ago from Chester, UK

      I love this! I study the English Language and it drives me up the wall seeing misused words!

    • profile image

      JimVT 6 years ago

      Although it's more evident as a mispronunciation than misuse the "route" - "rout" error always drives me up a wall.

      It gained momentum on the old Monday Night Football show with Howard Cosell, Frank Gifford and Don Meredith.

      In almost every game you could expect to hear Dandy Don applauding a "down and out pass rout!" by some quarterback and receiver duo.

      A route, of course, is a path between two points as in "Route 66 goes from Chicago to LA."

      A rout is a military disaster as in "Wellington routed Napoleon at Waterloo."

      I always wondered why would-be word-wizard Cosell didn't straighten Meredith out!

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 6 years ago

      Glad you learnt something new today Dawn!! Thank you for stopping by and commenting :)

    • dawnM profile image

      Dawn Michael 6 years ago from THOUSAND OAKS

      Now I feel really dumb, you got me on a few of those, some I knew thank goodness, but the one that got me the most was Complement versus Compliment, I admit that I did not the difference...lol

      thanks for a great article.

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 6 years ago

      Thank you, Shona, for stopping by and commenting. We do need reminders, don't we? Yes, people do rely on spell check far too often these days. Hope they realize reading this hub the pitfalls of relying too much on spell check. Thanks again for stopping by and commenting :)

    • Shona Venter profile image

      Shona Venter 6 years ago from South Africa

      A very useful reminder of using the correct forms of words at the correct times. These days, people rely far too much on spell check, yet they fail to realize that spell check does not equal grammar check!

      Thanks, Shil1978.

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 6 years ago

      Thank you, Angel, for stopping by and commenting. I hope this hub helps you :)

    • Angel Scent profile image

      Angel Scent 6 years ago from Florida

      Reading this is a great way to bone up on common mistakes in English. I know I need it, being out of school for almost thirty years.

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 6 years ago

      Thank you, mythbuster, for stopping by and commenting. Yes, #5 can be tricky for some. Glad you found this hub useful :)

    • mythbuster profile image

      mythbuster 6 years ago from Utopia, Oz, You Decide

      Words for #5 are ones I often get mixed up. Thanks for clarifying. Great hub, very useful!

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 6 years ago

      Thank you Shauky for stopping by and commenting. Am glad you liked this hub :)

    • shauky profile image

      shauky 6 years ago

      Hi Shil,

      Great hub here! I'll take your 'advice' and look out for these ;)

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Yes, MTD, English is a tough language to master for non-native speakers. However, I've been surprised at the many errors native speakers make. In fact, on some occasions, non-native speakers do a much better job with written English than native speakers.

      We all learn something new each day!! Thank you, MTD, for stopping by and commenting. Appreciate you visiting this hub and sharing your perspective :)

    • M. T. Dremer profile image

      M. T. Dremer 7 years ago from United States

      English is a screwy language. I didn't realized how messed up it was until I tried to learn Spanish. I used to get so angry when irregular words popped up, the kind of word that changes completely depending on tense. It was then that I realized English is filled with irregular words. Like, why is 'went' the past tense of 'go'? By our language rules the right one should be 'goed'. And I'm sure it makes non-native speakers just as angry as I was when I tried to learn Spanish (actually more so because Spanish isn't as bad as English). But anyway, I'm getting off topic. This is a great list. I'm a writer and I didn't even realize some of these little differences. Great job!

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Thank you, Robert, for stopping by and commenting. Thank you also for your very kind words :)

    • Robertbloggert profile image

      Robertbloggert 7 years ago from Oklahoma

      Thank you! Thank you! Thank you! A must bookmark for sure. And I love the hints you added a sure sign of a great teacher.

      Makes me think how I can probably count on one hand hints like this I learned from teachers in school. And we all know once you learn something this way you never forget it.

      Just look at righty tighty lefty loosey ( note not losey) who can forget that. Now as long as you can remember which is your right and which is left your set.

      ~I hold the pencil in this hand, got it~ Lol

      Oh and did I say Thank you!

      A new fan for sure~ Robert

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Thank you Uriel for stopping by and commenting. Glad you found this hub helpful!!

    • Uriel profile image

      Uriel 7 years ago from Lebanon

      very helpful indeed :D ~ especially for newbies :D

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      FF - Glad you found this hub useful enough to bookmark. Always nice to have you around! Thank you for stopping by and commenting!!

      SCMG - the affect/effect one can be tough, but not impossible. Am sure you can master it! Thanks for stopping by and commenting!!

    • Somecallmegreat profile image

      Somecallmegreat 7 years ago

      I am always falling victim to affect, and effect... I know which one I should use, then I doubt myself, and then I end up using the one I knew I should have in the first place. I'm with the others, I'm going to bookmark it for future reference.

    • fastfreta profile image

      Alfreta Sailor 7 years ago from Southern California

      I really like this, because I really needed it. Especially because, at times I have a problem on how to use the phrase, "some time." I'm going to bookmark these hubs for future reference.

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Thank you Lena for stopping by and commenting. Yes, editing one's own work can be difficult. It doesn't help if you don't know the difference between words like "loose/lose," "affect/effect," etc.

      Someone else, who knows better, may be able to point out these errors. However, you can see your own obvious errors/typos by looking at your work from a fresh perspective.

      If you revise your work after some time (an hour or so later), you can catch your obvious typos/errors. Thanks again for commenting Lena!!

    • lovebuglena profile image

      Lena Kovadlo 7 years ago from Staten Island, NY

      Great hub. There are times when we misspell a word, thus creating a word with a different meaning, and we don't even realize it until someone points it out.

      I've seen people misuse they're/there/their. That is a very common one. And of course as you say there are many more misused or perhaps simply misspelled words out there.

      Thanks for sharing.

      I've learned that sometimes we need to ask someone to read over our own writing and look for typos because sometimes we just don't see our own typos, even though they are right under our noses.

      Lena

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Alicia - I am working on part 3 of this series. Would discuss this in that hub!! Thanks for stopping by and for the suggestion!!

    • aliciajadebrowne profile image

      aliciajadebrowne 7 years ago from I am where I am, and that's all you need to know.

      Perceive and conceive?

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      AOkay - thank you for stopping by and commenting. Yes, most Internet writing is, well, influenced by personal interpretation of the English language - relying on spellcheck doesn't always work, especially when you need to know which word to use.

      Most of the words above won't show up in spellcheck as an error. Am glad you found this hub useful enough to bookmark. Thanks again for visiting :)

      Maruthirp - I hope you can improve your knowledge of the English language. It can be hard but you can master it with persistence. Good luck to you Maruthirp. Thanks for stopping by and commenting!!

    • maruthirp profile image

      maruthirp 7 years ago from Hyderabad

      I am very poor in vocabulary. This post give me very good interest to learning vocabulay. In my area where telugu is primary speaking language it is tougher to learn good english words.

    • AOkay12 profile image

      AOkay12 7 years ago from Florida

      Thanks for writing this Hub. I bookmarked it. You pointed out a few errors that I have made from time to time. Some of us could use a little tweaking in English writing and grammar skills. I have also seen internet writing which requires a complete overhaul. LOL.

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Thank you Ralph for stopping by and commenting. Those are some great additions, thank you for sharing!!

    • Ralph Deeds profile image

      Ralph Deeds 7 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Great hub. A couple of my pet peeve misused words

      --honed in instead of homed in (as in homing pigeon)

      --inferred for implied as in "He inferred that he was coming." (Incorrect.) He implied that he was coming. (Correct.)

      --repore for rapport as in "He established good repore with the audience." (wrong) "He established good rapport with the group." (correct)

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      MG - yes, it is funny, isn't it :) Thank you for stopping by and commenting!!

    • Midtown Girl profile image

      Midtown Girl 7 years ago from Right where I want to be!

      Every time I see something written about this topic, I have to laugh! It's almost always the same words...over and over, and over! Thank you for bringing more attention to this. Even with my own awareness, there are a couple on your list that I struggle with, too.

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Pinkhawk - thank you for stopping by and commenting! Glad you found this hub useful. Thanks again for visiting :)

      Samman - thank you for stopping by and commenting as well!! Glad you found this hub informative :)

    • samman profile image

      samman 7 years ago

      Very informative hub. Thanks for sharing.

    • pinkhawk profile image

      pinkhawk 7 years ago from Pearl of the Orient

      ...I am not a native English speaker so this is quite useful for me, thank you very much for sharing!^.^

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Splitty Booms - Thank you for stopping by and commenting! Yes, #5 can be a tricky one for some people. Am glad you know the difference between them now :)

    • Splitty Booms profile image

      Splitty Booms 7 years ago from Arizona

      Good grief! I've been doing #5 FOREVER! And now thanks to you, I'll never be able to get it out of my mind:) Great hub!

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Thank you Steele for stopping by and commenting. Yes, some of these mistakes are all too common, especially on the Internet! This hub was a pleasure to write!!

      Aussieteacher, great additions!! I'd imagine those two are examples of mistakes made often by the Chinese. If so, would be understandable. There are quite a few of them that ESL students find very tricky!!

      Thank you AT for stopping by and commenting!!

    • Aussieteacher profile image

      Di 7 years ago from Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

      Yes, but there are so many. As I am in China I see lots of the mistakes in the public arena. I have not read your other posts, but I have two favourites. Smile/Smell, and Snacks/snakes.

    • Steele Fields profile image

      susan beck 7 years ago from drexel hill,pa

      What a good idea for a hub. As a teacher, I come across these mistakes quite often. Thanks for choosing (that's choose not chose, lol) a few of the synonyms that bug me the most.:)

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Thank you Jeanie for stopping by and commenting. Yes, what you say is true - reason why I thought of writing a hub on this subject!!

      Thank you for your words of appreciation and thank you once again for visiting this hub :)

    • jeanie.stecher profile image

      jeanie.stecher 7 years ago from Seattle

      Hi Shil! Very informative hub. Although that these English words are commonly used yet they are commonly misused. It is nice to know, as a reminder, that we should be aware of these common mistakes as this might just change things the way it should be. Nice hub.=)

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Thank you Paul for stopping by and commenting. Yes, that's another one. There are just so many of them! Thanks for pointing that one out :)

      Gbearl - it was a pleasure writing this hub. Am glad you found it useful. Thanks for stopping by and commenting!!

    • profile image

      gbearl111 7 years ago

      Thanks so much for writing this article! I learned a lot! I also learned my grammar is totally off! Thanks again!8)

    • profile image

      Paul Henne 7 years ago

      I thank you for writing this article. I would add one of my execrations: refute. People often use refute when then mean rebuke, rescind, or even repudiate. I guess my issue is with specificity - but whatever.

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Thank you Petra for stopping by and commenting - glad you found this hub useful.

      Yes, English can be quite difficult for non-native speakers, but you'd be surprised at the errors native speakers make! It is a wonderful language but it can be quite confusing.

      I don't mind Petra - in fact, that would be quite nice of you to do so!! Thanks again for stopping by and commenting!!

      Iceman - thank you for the appreciation. Thanks for visiting this hub and commenting!!

    • Iceman1987 profile image

      Iceman1987 7 years ago from Washington

      Well done!

    • Petra Vlah profile image

      Petra Vlah 7 years ago from Los Angeles

      So glad you wrote this article and gave such great practical and useful examples. As a non-native speaker I know better than most how difficult English can be (just wrote a hub about "the never ending challenge"). Bookmarked for sure and will link this hub to mine if you don't mind. Thank you

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Thank you Cybersupe for stopping by and commenting. Yes, texting has had a profoundly negative impact on the English language. Quite unfortunate that! Glad you found this hub informative. Thanks again for your comments!!

      Oishi, I agree! The most commonly used words are the ones that cause the most confusion and yes, perhaps, it could be because we assume that we know about it all and focus on other less common words.

      I do hope to write a followup hub on this topic, so be tuned in :)

      Thanks again for stopping by and for your comments!!

    • oishi profile image

      oishi 7 years ago

      That was very helpful. As a non-native English speaker I find it quite useful. It is the commonly used words I think that often cause the most confusion. May be because we are more serious about the figurative words.Looking forward to see more on this topic.

    • CYBERSUPE profile image

      CYBERSUPE 7 years ago from MALVERN, PENNSYLVANIA, U.S.A.

      Right on ! Our English language is getting hammered in this day and age with all the texting going on. Excellent Hub and most informative.

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Thank you Madison for stopping by and commenting. Am glad you found this article useful! Thanks also for all the nice things, much appreciated :)

    • Madison22 profile image

      Madison 7 years ago from NYC

      Shil,this is an incredibly useful article, one that I must admit to needing from time to time. A bookmark, rate up and pass along...thank you!!!

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Thank you 'littleones' for stopping by and commenting!! Yes, 'there' and 'their' - another set of words commonly misused.

      For those who get confused with this particular set of words, I'd recommend this tip to remember which one means what!

      There = T + ( here ) = 'here' - as in a place.

      Their = T + ( heir ) = 'heir' - as in possessing it or owning it.

      I don't quite like it there. (place)

      I love their house. (possession/owning)

      American and UK spellings do differ. Examples being color (US) versus colour (UK), neighbor (US) versus neighbour (UK). There are many other words like these and they do confuse!

      Personally, I try to use spellings based on who my audience is, or who I am writing to but I can see why this might be very confusing to folks learning the English language (non-native speakers)!!

    • littleones profile image

      littleones 7 years ago from LEEDS UK

      What about there and their? people are constantly getting them confused!

      I also think that Microsoft word has something to do with spelling errors, America seem to have adopted the English language by changing certain spellings, which is only going to confuse people more especially those who are learning the language as it is one of the hardest to learn.

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Hey Ron, if I were to do another one on spoken English, I honestly wouldn't know where to start. I mean there are just so many words that are pronounced one way and spelled another, but it is an interesting challenge. So, I might just give it a shot!!

      Spelling error pardoned Ron :) It happens to all of us, those darn typos!! As long as we know we made an error and can change it before it goes out - all is well.

      I guess you missed out on the 5 minute edit time and unfortunately I can't change it either here, but its cool Ron - this is no test :)

      Thanks for stopping by and commenting!!

    • profile image

      Ron 7 years ago

      Whoops! PLEASE pardon the spelling error, actually typo (since my keyboard doesn't always cooperate with me).

    • profile image

      Ron 7 years ago

      Thanks for pointing out a great list of written errors. Now, if you do one on spoken English, pleas start off with people saying fortayyyyyy when, in spite of the spelling, forte is still just plain ol' fort in pronunciation.

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Nice additions Sylvie. Oh yes, the singular possessive! I love them! Perhaps, I'd write another hub covering that as well.

      Thanks again Sylvie for stopping by and commenting :)

    • Sylvie Strong profile image

      Sylvie Strong 7 years ago

      I like when people use "penultimate" when they mean "ultimate."

      People often use "enervate" when they mean "energize."

      And don't get me started about people that do not know how to use the singular possessive of words ending with an "s." :) Nice hub.

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Thank you Kishorilal for stopping by and commenting!!

    • profile image

      Kishorilal 7 years ago

      Thanks for the guide :D

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Thank you SilverGenes for stopping by and for your appreciation of this hub. Those are some nice tips indeed. Thank you for sharing :)

    • profile image

      SilverGenes 7 years ago

      Good hub! I used to remember the advice and advise difference by "ice" which is a noun. If it contains ice, it's a noun. Oh, and the principal is your 'pal' :)

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Thank you 'i scribble' for stopping by! Yes, I am much like you :)

      Nice additions too, thanks for those :)

    • i scribble profile image

      i scribble 7 years ago

      I like this hub cuz I'm kinda compulsive about this stuff. I'm guessing you are too. Here are a couple more: council and counsel-My teacher counseled me to attend the student council meeting to voice my concerns.

      imply & infer-My new friend implied that my lateness inconvenienced her, from which I inferred she was a stickler for punctuality.

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Thank you iwritegood for stopping by this hub. Glad you found this hub useful :)

      Thanks for your kind comments!!

    • iwritegood profile image

      iwritegood 7 years ago

      Very nice hub. I actually learned something today :)

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Thank you sord87 for stopping by this hub. Am glad you found this hub useful. Thank you for taking the time to comment :)

    • profile image

      sord87 7 years ago

      Yes you are definitely right about those common mistakes.It happen many times probably by me and others too!Thank you for giving some ideas to correct it!

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Thank you Jarrod for visiting this hub. Yes, the affect/effect confusion is quite widespread and I've seen these being used interchangeably!!

      Am glad you found this hub helpful in resolving the confusion.

      Thanks again for stopping by Jarrod :)

    • Jarrod1240 profile image

      Jarrod1240 7 years ago

      Your descriptions and comments on the affect/effect mistakes were very helpful. For some reason I have always struggled with the use of those words.

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Thank you Gus and Goji for stopping by this hub!! Gus, made a note of that :)

      Goji, yes those are some commonly misused words as well. Perhaps, I'd write on those in my next hub.

      Thanks again both of you for stopping by and commenting :)

    • GojiJuiceGoodness profile image

      GojiJuiceGoodness 7 years ago from Roanoke, Virginia

      I think people also tend to confuse there, their & they're. And it's vs. its.

      Good info you've got here. Thanks for hubbing!

    • GusTheRedneck profile image

      Gustave Kilthau 7 years ago from USA

      Shil - Check this pair: clamoring vs. clambering.(Close only counts in love and in horseshoe tossing.)

      Gus :-)))

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Thank you MM for stopping by this hub!! Thanks for pointing that out - fixed it!! Guess I missed that one :)

      Thanks again for visiting MM!!

    • profile image

      Marty Magee 7 years ago

      Shil: Great list. Thanks. I did find one of your own in your hub: "Different than." I believe it should be, "different from." Of course, they've changed a lot of things since I was in school, but I tend to stay with old school. I think I'm going to enjoy your hubs.

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Thank you Mary for dropping by this hub and for your appreciation of it. Thank you for your comments :)

    • profile image

      MaryRenee 7 years ago

      Shil: Excellent hub! It's all so very true! :)

    • Shil1978 profile image
      Author

      Shil1978 7 years ago

      Thank you dearest Al for stopping by - its always nice to have you around and hear your interesting perspectives!!

      Yes, native speakers do make a lot of these mistakes and I agree that non-native speakers tend to be more careful, although they would have to really learn the language well to understand the intricacies!!

      Al, you are not alone - I too am learning. You come across new words, nuances all the time. You never stop learning - there will always be something you don't know!!

      Thanks again Al for stopping by - always a pleasure to communicate with you :)

    • Mystique1957 profile image

      Mystique1957 7 years ago from Caracas-Venezuela

      My dearest Shil...

      Great hub! Amazingly enough we see these common mistakes in native speakers, because of the written form. Of course, we non-native speakers also incur in such mistakes, but since we were forced to learn proper grammar to be able to reach a native level, we tend to be very careful with that. Excellent topic. Rated up and useful!

      Warmest hugs and infinite heavenly blessings,

      Al

      P.S

      I am still learning, in spite of the fact that I´ve been writing and speaking English for over 25 years.