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Faeries, Brownies and other nymphs

Updated on April 14, 2015
Walt Disney's Tinker Bell.
Walt Disney's Tinker Bell. | Source
Source

Faeries

Faeries have always been magical, enchanting, sprites that flutter around in imaginary worlds. They became part of our childhood culture through such stories and books as E.M Barrie's Peter Pan. We have grown to love Tinker Bell, one of the faery characters from that book.

Walt Disney took this iconic character from the book and turned her into the most popular of Disney animated characters. She even became the non-official mascot of Walt Disney World. After Mickey Mouse, she is the symbol of magic, diminutive faeries, fluttering wings, and magic wands. Tinker Bell and her family of faeries were always around to help us get through the maze of a situation. But, where to faeries, brownies and other nymphs come from?

Over many years, they have come from the British Isles, especially England and Scotland. It is from the oral stories handed down over the generations there and from English and Scottish illustrators that we get the stories and images we have today of faeries, brownies and other nymphs.

And, by the way, just what is a faerie?

A faery is defined as a mythical or legendary creature, a form of spirit, and often described as metaphysical, supernatural or preternatural. It can describe any magical creature including brownies, pixies, goblins, gnomes, elves and trolls. Other times it can refer to the more ethereal creatures with the diaphonous wings. Faeries are usually described as human in appearance and having magical powers.

In our modern culture faeries are depicted as young, sometimes winged humanoids of small stature. But, they do not have to be small. The small size is not always constant. They can grow to human size and they magically can return to their diminutive stature. In many stories small faeries flew by magic, sometimes flying on ragwort stems or backs of birds.

Folklorists say that their actual origin lies in a conquered race living in hiding. Or many contribute faeries to religious beliefs in the British Isles that died out with the advent of Christianity. One common theme among Celtic nations was that there existed a race of small people who have been driven into hiding by invading humans. Faeries are believed to have lived in the 'Otherworld' many times described as being underground or in hidden hills or across the Western sea.

English literature is full of faeries and faerie worlds. Edmund Spencer featured a faerie world that came to the aid of Prince Arthur in his great epic poem, The Faerie Queen. In his great poem, the Faerie Queen represented and symbolized his great Queen Elizabeth I.

My favorite faerie world is in William Shakespeare's play, A Midsummer Night's Dream. Here Shakespeare took the faerie world of Titania and Oberon and their minions, already in British folklore and legend, and included them in his plot and play. Legend has it that in Britain every June 21, on midsummer night, the faerie world comes alive to help bring lovers together. The play and the faery world is partially set in the realm of faeryland under the light of the moon. There is a great faery dispute going on this particular midsummer night and it creates a tension underlying the plot and affecting the actions of the characters. Shakespeare blurs fantasy and reality in the play and through his dreamlike magical moments makes possible our belief in the faery world.

The faeries in Shakespeare's plays exhibit all the personalities and behaviors that the English believed in at the time. These faeries are loyal to their King and Queen, they intermingle with and try to help the human characters come together in love and harmony only to learn, "What fools these mortals be."

In the beginning of Act II, of Shakespeare's play, one of the faeries explains her daily routine,

Over hill, over dale,

Thorough bush, thorough brier,

Over park, over pale

Thorough flood, thorough fire,

I do wander everywhere,

Swifter than the moon's sphere,

And I serve the Fairy Queen

To dew her orbs upon the green.

The cowslips tall her pensioners be;

In their gold coats spots you see;

Those be rubies, fairy favors,

In those freckles live their savors.

I must go seek some dewdrops here,

And hang a pearl in every cowslip's ear.

Farewell, thou lob of spirits; I'll be gone.

Our queen and all her elves come here anon.

What is interesting is the hierarchy that the faery world has and after Queen Titania and King Oberon, the next highest faery in power is Puck, who takes charge of the other faeries and gives them their orders. But, of course, the faeries are a bit mischievous, too. They can get into trouble and muck things up. Although they live around humans and want to help them, they can confound them, too.

Also, from Act II, Puck describes the shinanigans that he and his minions of faeries can get into,

Thou speakest aright;

I am that merry wanderer of the night.

I jest to Oberon, and make him smile,

When I a fat and bean-fed horse beguile,

Neighing in likeness of a filly foal;

And sometimes lurk I in a gossip's bowl,

In very likeness of a roasted crab;

And when she drinks, against her lips I bob

And on her withered dewlap pour the ale.

The wisest aunt, telling the saddest tale,

Sometime for three-foot stool mistaketh me;

Then slip I from her bum, down topples she,

And "tailor" cries, and falls into a cough;

And then the whole quire hold their hips and laugh,

And waxen in their mirth and neeze, and swear

A merrier hour was never wasted there.

But, room, fairy! Here comes Oberon.

Puck is famous in British lore for always being around and causing the mischief when the tailor has a coughing spell, when the gossip spills her beer, and the aunt falls off her stool, this is the mischief created by Puck. They live in their own world but intermingle with the human world and cause goodness and mischief.

Shakespeare brings alive for us the faery lore and legend of the British Isles when he included the faery world of Titania, Oberon, and Puck. And, if you don't believe in faery world's? Then just heed Puck's words at the conclusion of the play,

If we shadows have offended,

Think but this, and all is mended:

That you have but slumb'red here,

While these visions did appear.


Source: William Shakespeare A Midsummer Night's Dream Holt Rinehart Winston

A Midsummer Night's Dream

Illustration of the faery world from Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream," showing Queen Titania and King Oberon and their faery world.
Illustration of the faery world from Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream," showing Queen Titania and King Oberon and their faery world. | Source

Titania and Oberon

Illustration of a brownie by illustrator, Palmer Cox.
Illustration of a brownie by illustrator, Palmer Cox. | Source
Palmer Cox, Canadian - American writer and illustrator of "The Brownies."
Palmer Cox, Canadian - American writer and illustrator of "The Brownies." | Source

Brownies

I joined the Brownies when I was six years old. The Brownies are the junior group of girls that are part the Girl Scouts here in the U.S. The name of this group for small girls was taken from the legend and folklore of the British Isles. Again, Brownies were little wee ones from English and Scottish lore that inhabited houses and aided in tasks around the home. They looked like the illustration to the right and if you notice, wore little beanie caps on their heads. We did too, in our girls' Brownie group as part of our brown Brownie uniform. We were supposed to be helpful little Brownies to our mothers around the house, helping with tasks, and staying out of trouble at the same time. We were to scamper around the house, barely noticeable, helping our mothers clean and unclutter the house.

As with faeries, brownies were little creatures popular in folklore around Scotland and England. Brownies resemble the hobs, similar to a hobgoblin in folklore, but good hobgoblins. According to the British legend brownies lived in houses and aided in tasks around the house. They do not like to be seen and only work at night, traditionally in exchange for small gifts of food. Brownies made their home in the unused portion of the house, never disturbing the human folk they lived with. And, they would abandon any house where the gifts were called payments or if the human folk of the house misused them.

Brownies would seldom speak to the human folk but held frequent conversations with one another. They slept during the day and conversed and did their helpful tasks at night. In Scottish legend and lore, brownies also lived outside alongside and within streams and brooks. Brownies have always been depicted as fun loving creatures looking for adventures.

There were also other ways in which Brownies became part of my life here in the U.S. The . brownie elf was used as the mascot for the Cleveland Browns football team from 1946-1965. Then, Art Modell bought the team and as owner phased out Brownie as a mascot for the team. Before Art Modell, the fans even called the Browns, 'Brownies'. The mascot was revived on a limited basis by the Clevelandf Browns when the team returned in Cleveland in 1999, after Modell had hijacked his team to Baltimore. During the 2004 Browns football season, the Brownies appeared on the team's sideline ponchos and equipment trucks.

The Eastman Kodak company came out with the Brownie camera in the 1960s, named for the little wee folk called brownies. It was the first popular handheld 'box' camera. My father bought me my first camera when I was nine or ten years old and it was a Kodak Brownie camera. You pulled up the lens cover, which was on the top of the camera, looked into the lens, focused your picture and then snapped the button to take it. I used black and white film, and it was so fun to have a camera to take my own pictures instead of always posing for pictures. It gave me a sense of confident independence to be able to record life how I saw it through the lens. I have loved photography all my life and as I got older, my cameras became more sophisticated. But, it is the little 'box' Brownie camera that formed my love of photography and the individual unique vision of the world that I could record with one.

If you remember the film, "Willow" from the 1980s it had two little Brownie characters that 'helped' Willow throughout the film. The Brownies also appeard in the three novels that came after the film, "Shadow Moon," "Shadown Dawn," and "Shadow Star." And, there are even little House Elves in the "Harry Potter" series that show great resemblance to the brownies of folklore and may have been inspired by them.

And where did we get the illustrations of the wee little Brownies that have entertained us over the years? From the Canadian illustrator and author Palmer Cox (1840-1924). He originally came up with the illustration you see to the right. He is best known for "The Brownies", a series of humorous verse books and comic strips about mischievous but kind-hearted fairy-like spirits.

Cox was born in Granby, Quebec in Canada and became a carpenter and car builder in his adult life. In 1874, he began to formally study drawing and contributed stories and illustrations for them to different publications in Canada and the U.S.

He eventually moved to San Francisco and New York City for work related reasons. His earliest publication of the Brownie character was in 1879. By 1883, his Brownie stories appeared in "St. Nicholas Magazine," and as the stories and illustrations grew in popularity they were published in magazines such s the "Ladies' Home Journal." In his illustrations, each of his Brownies had a distinctive look and they were depicted as little men who had mischievous adventures together.

Thanks to the British Iles and their folklore and legends, we have had faery and brownie worlds of our own here in the U.S. And, especially when we were children, we were delighted by tales of faeries, brownies and of course, Tinker Bell. Thanks to those British writers and illustrators, and Walt Disney, we have been able to experience our own little enchanted Neverland, no matter how brief our childhood was.


Copyright (c) 2012 Suzannah Wolf Walker all rights reserved

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  • billybuc profile image

    Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

    LOL...I saw the title of this hub and all I saw was "brownie." I thought it was going to be a recipe for my favorite food group. Darn it! Instead it turned out to be a very interesting group of facts that I knew very little about. How about that? A surprise every minute on HubPages!

    Good job my friend!

  • suzettenaples profile image
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    Suzette Walker 4 years ago from Taos, NM

    I'll go to any length to get someone to read one of my hubs! LOL Well, I'm glad you enjoyed it anyway. I'll have to start putting a food word in every title. It might work better than SEO keywords! LOL Thanks for the visit, my friend - most appreciated!

  • Mhatter99 profile image

    Martin Kloess 4 years ago from San Francisco

    Great report! Arlene and I used to let our imaginations fly wen we saw fireflies. What do lovers know?

  • Amy Becherer profile image

    Amy Becherer 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO

    I knew little about faeries and less about brownies before I read your interesting article, Suzette. As a child, I don't remember being read stories before bed, or going to the movies or being involved in the "brownies". I think my parents were maxed out with my dad working shiftwork and my mom taking care of three children all day everyday. I had to laugh when I saw the illustration of the brownie, as I am reminded of a comic strip cartoon, or maybe "The Simpsons", or SNL's "The Coneheads!"

    Fantastic history of these spunky mythical beings that, although like mischievous children, were benevolent little minxes. The illustrations mirror your perfect descriptions that make me want to learn and enjoy their escapades through some books. Hey, it's never to late to learn something new...especially when it's something beautiful and magical.

    Thank you, Suzette, for once again, broadening my horizon.

  • suzettenaples profile image
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    Suzette Walker 4 years ago from Taos, NM

    Fireflies are the perfect symbol, MHatter! They are like little Tinker Bells floating and flying around. I loved catching fireflies when I was a child. Your "sweetheart" is so blessed to have you - you are such a romantic at heart. I love imaginative little worlds!

  • suzettenaples profile image
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    Suzette Walker 4 years ago from Taos, NM

    Amy: You are such a hoot! I had so much fun teaching this play to 8th graders. They are still young enough to act like little kids sometimes. I am a great believer in imagination and playing pretend and dressing up in costumes to learn. So I brought in wings, magic wands, crowns, masks etc. for the kids to dress up and perform this play in class. We had a riot and it was so funny - the kids had so much fun acting out the fairy world that we took out a class period just to study fairies, brownies, pixies, etc. They were so interested in pixies and pixie dust that we had an inside joke going the rest of the school year. I love imaginative worlds so we read "Alice in Wonderland" and "Narnia" and the kids wrote papers on them and "Midsummer" and we ended up having the best time that school year and I didn't even have to fight with them to write papers. It was one of the most fun Language Arts classes I have ever taught.

    I grew up in the "burbs" and had "all the advantages" like Brownies, dancing lessons, piano lessons etc. But there were other difficulties like emotional and mental abuse. So I didn't have the perfect Norman Rockwell childhood either. We all have our "battle scars" from life. Things are not aways what they appear to be. But, we all do the best we can with what we were handed in life. I think that is why I love imaginary worlds - it is a form of escapism.

    I love your comparison of the brownies to "The Coneheads". They do look like Coneheads and I loved that on SNL - Jane Curtin, what a superb comic. I have learned so much from you, Amy. You are so good at getting your emotions out in your poetry and your unique comparison and conceits always leave me astounded. I love to read such personal and truthful poetry. So, thank you for broadening my horizon.

  • Movie Master profile image

    Movie Master 4 years ago from United Kingdom

    What an interesting read, I knew nothing about the history of the Brownies - a lot of my friends were brownies, I always wanted to be one, but somehow missed out!

    I still believe in fairies!!

    Wonderful, thank you and voted up.

  • suzettenaples profile image
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    Suzette Walker 4 years ago from Taos, NM

    Hi Lesley: I understand England had Brownies also as a junior group before the Girl Guides. In fact that is where the U.S. got the idea of Brownies and Girl Scouts groups for young girls. I believe in fairies , too LOL. Thanks for reading and for the votes.

  • Hyphenbird profile image

    Brenda Barnes 4 years ago from America-Broken But Still Beautiful

    Your Hubs are without fail interesting and unusual. This one is very detailed which I love. Like most everyone else I love Tinkerbell but know these creatures are so much more. However I did not know most of what you discovered. Thanks for a most entertaining read.

  • suzettenaples profile image
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    Suzette Walker 4 years ago from Taos, NM

    So glad you enjoyed this Hyphen. I love fairies and pixies and brownies etc. LOL It's all a fantasy world. I have to say the same about your hubs also - so interesting and unusual. I love your Bible hubs and the stories of the women of the Old Testament. They are great and so full of wisdom. Your vegan recipe series is great also. They are delicious! And I love your Wabi Sabi (I know I got that wrong, but you know what I mean) attitude. It is so great - simplicity and minimalism. I get a kick out of you Hyphen! I always look forward to reading your hubs.

  • Cogerson profile image

    Cogerson 4 years ago from Virginia

    Very nicely done.....I thought I knew something about fairies before reading this hub.....but it turns out that I am wrong....as your hub on fairies and brownies....it is both informative and interesting...not a combo you see all the time on HubPages. I could not get your video of Titania and Oberon to work...it says it is unavailable. Voted up and awesome.

  • suzettenaples profile image
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    Suzette Walker 4 years ago from Taos, NM

    Thank you! I'm glad you enjoyed this hub. Yes, just ask my former students - I'm the fairy expert. LOL I'm probably a bit quirky in my hub topics. Thanks for the tip on the video - I will check into it.

  • suzettenaples profile image
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    Suzette Walker 4 years ago from Taos, NM

    Thank you! I'm glad you enjoyed this hub. Yes, just ask my former students - I'm the fairy expert. LOL I'm probably a bit quirky in my hub topics. Thanks for the tip on the video - I will check into it.

  • Patty Kenyon profile image

    Patty Kenyon 4 years ago from Ledyard, Connecticut

    Very Interesting!!!! I love reading about legends, lore, Fairy Tales...etc.

    You did an Amazing Job and I loved the picture you used as well!!!

    Voted Up, Awesome, and Interesting!!!

  • suzettenaples profile image
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    Suzette Walker 4 years ago from Taos, NM

    Thank you Patty. I love fairies and pixies and all the rest. So glad you enjoyed this - it is fun isn't it? Thanks for the visit!

  • James A Watkins profile image

    James A Watkins 4 years ago from Chicago

    I found your article extraordinary. I enjoyed reading it very much. I learned a lot from it and it is fun. :-)

  • suzettenaples profile image
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    Suzette Walker 4 years ago from Taos, NM

    Thank you James. I admire your writing so much that when you visit and comment I am always pleased. I'm so glad you enjoyed reading this. I love fairies etc. and all those great stories about them and even took an entire block class period to teach about them in my literature classes. I love the imaginary world - I guess that is why I read and write. LOL I enjoyed writing this so much, too. Thanks for the visit and your comments!

  • epigramman profile image

    epigramman 4 years ago

    ...always a pleasure .... you are the consummate hub architect - you know how to put together the definitive hub presentation no matter what the subject and this is just yet another fine example which will be posted to my FB group Let's just talk music or cinema - sending you warm wishes and good energy from lake erie time ontario canada 8:39pm

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    Suzette Walker 4 years ago from Taos, NM

    Epi, I am so glad you enjoyed this and thank you for your comments. I try. Thanks so much for the share. I have to let the imaginative side of me come out somehow and that's the fun of HP. I have to work hard to keep up with your poetry presentations and your poetry writing - you are a hard act to follow that is for sure. I send you warm wishes back and it sounds like all is well in Ontario, Canada.

  • vox vocis profile image

    Jasmine 4 years ago

    Fairies are another important element in my book. I didn't know about brownies before. There's someone in my book who would be delighted to have brownies for friends because this somebody is not really human and doesn't know how to do any housework (which is expected of her). I added them to seashells on my idea list. Thank you!

  • suzettenaples profile image
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    Suzette Walker 4 years ago from Taos, NM

    vox: well, you weren't kidding when you said you were going to read some of my hubs. You are picking the better ones, thank goodness. This was so fun for me to write. I have to read this book you are writing - fairies and seashells? That's not to bad of a stretch. I'm glad these are inspiring you. Are you writing an e-book? Do tell! LOL

  • vox vocis profile image

    Jasmine 4 years ago

    I'll try to get it published (don't they all lol) Maybe I get lucky, but I'm realistic and don't expect too much. Amanda Hockings was refused numerous times by publishers so she decided to go for e-book editions. Two years later, she had two million dollars on her account thanks to her books. I'm not saying I'm the next Amanda, but her story is inspiring. I really enjoy writing this book and doing research for it (I found inspiration and ideas in Celtic mythology). You'll get it as a present once I publish it. Remember, only brutally honest comments are welcome whether you like the book or not :)

  • suzettenaples profile image
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    Suzette Walker 4 years ago from Taos, NM

    No, I want to buy a copy. I have a book written but haven't gotten my butt in gear to have it published as an e-book. Mine is a fiction story and period piece but it is probably not a great piece of literature LOL. I don't know of Amanda Hockings, but I will look into her writings. She sounds very successful at this. I will give it a fair review and be honest. But, if I like, I like it - so I'll let you know that too. Good luck and I wish you the best in your endeavors. I'm throwing some pixie dust your way for good luck! LOL

  • moonlake profile image

    moonlake 4 years ago from America

    I loved reading about the fairies and brownies never knew all of this. A town near us has a Fairy Festival every year and all the little girls come dressed as fairies and some of the grown-ups. Vote up

  • suzettenaples profile image
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    Suzette Walker 4 years ago from Taos, NM

    moonlake: I have always been interested in fairies, magic and fantasy - put them all together and you find a magical fairy world! lol I think a Fairy Festival would be so much fun. I'd probably be one of the adults dressed up as a fairy. I loved dressing up and playing 'pretend' when I was a child. I even incorporated it in my middle school classroom. The students and I had so much fun with it especially when we read "A Midsummer Night's Dream." Teachiing that Shakespeare play was hoot and one of the highlights of my teaching career. So glad you enjoyed reading this and thanks so much for your comments. Thanks for the votes.

  • Jools99 profile image

    Jools99 4 years ago from North-East UK

    Wonderful hib Suzette, so interesting! The 'wee folk' as you call them seem to have a strong link to my part of the world though it seems most cultures have similar mythical creatures. I have never seen a faerie though I have read and heard stories by people who claim to have seen them :o) Brownies are still very popular in the UK.

  • suzettenaples profile image
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    Suzette Walker 4 years ago from Taos, NM

    Jools: Thank you so much and I'm so happy you enjoyed reading this. I love the fantasy of faeries and they are depicted as such beautiful creatures. I know there have been faerie sightings as some claim. I'd love to see on myself. I'm glad to hear Brownies are still popular in the UK. It's always good to believe, I say.

  • Nell Rose profile image

    Nell Rose 4 years ago from England

    Hi Suzette, this is great! I love fairies, I have about ten in my bedroom! lol! everybody know I collect them hence all the fairies on my shelves and bookcases! In a lot of books fairies are called the Gentry, these are the human size fairies, I am reading about them now! great hub, and voted up! nell

  • suzettenaples profile image
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    Suzette Walker 4 years ago from Taos, NM

    Nell: Thank you. I haven't hear of the fairies called Gentry. I will have to look into that - I didn't know there were life-sized fairies. I always think of them as 'wee folk' and have never realized they could be our size. Much the better! lol. Thanks so much for your comments and visit - most appreciated.

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    Vickiw 3 years ago

    Really wonderful read, Suzette! I really enjoyed it. Your background research is amazing, and it is so well put together!

    http://www.griefcanheal.com/

  • DreamerMeg profile image

    DreamerMeg 3 years ago from Northern Ireland

    I was a Brownie for some years, before becoming a Guide. Don't think I was too quiet around the house, though! I have always loved reading about fairies, goblins, sprites and the like.

  • suzettenaples profile image
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    Suzette Walker 3 years ago from Taos, NM

    Thank you Vicki and I am so glad you enjoyed this. Thanks for your comments. Most appreciated.

  • suzettenaples profile image
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    Suzette Walker 3 years ago from Taos, NM

    DreamerMeg: I was a Brownie, too, when I was a child. That's where I first learned about brownies and fairies etc.. Of course, I knew Tinkerbell, but did not know the history of all this in England. Thanks so much for reading this and I am glad you enjoyed reading it.

  • limpet profile image

    Ian Stuart Robertson 2 years ago from London England

    Passing by a house where the late ballerina Dame Anna Pavlova spent quite a few years residing there has been erected a life size bronze statue of a slender rather 'sylph like' statue of the dancer in flight sporting double wings from each shoulder. Dame Anna lived in Hampstead, North London overlooking the heathlands.

  • suzettenaples profile image
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    Suzette Walker 2 years ago from Taos, NM

    Hi limpet: Another interesting historical tidbit from you. I love ballet and I know a little of Dame Anna Pavlova. I believe she danced with the Ballet Russe or the Minsky Ballet or the Imperial Russian Ballet. My memory is not great in this area, but she was a great dancer. I would love to see her statue and where she lived. But, I know she is one of the greats. Thanks so much for all the interesting information you comment about. I enjoyed reading this.

  • limpet profile image

    Ian Stuart Robertson 2 years ago from London England

    Recently i bought a picture book at the library booksale titled the Faery garden by Beatrice Philpottes. I was amazed they wanted to dispose of it so soon after print. It is gorgeously illustrated but 'get this' it's not a children's book as it's dialogue is quite heavy reading although kids would definitely love it. The Faery garden is as much about horticulture as it is folklore.

  • suzettenaples profile image
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    Suzette Walker 2 years ago from Taos, NM

    limpet: Thanks so much for bringing this book to my attention. I will certainly look for it an see if I can find it to read and view the beautiful illustrations. I think faery gardens are beautiful and have seen photos of a few, but never actually visited one. This is just another reason for me to get to the UK! Gotta visit those faeries and their gardens. I love gardening and faeries so this is right up my alley. LOL!

  • limpet profile image

    Ian Stuart Robertson 2 years ago from London England

    merrie we meet

    Hope you find Beatrice Philpotts's The Faery Garden. The copy i've obtained is published by Palazzo Editions of Bath in Somerset, England in 2005. You may also wish to visit the Peg Maltby's Fairyland website for an insight into elementals in Australian folklore.

    Bless

    the limpet

  • suzettenaples profile image
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    Suzette Walker 2 years ago from Taos, NM

    limpet: Thank you so much for recommending this book and website. I will certainly check out both. I love faery lore and I know I will enjoy each one of your suggestions. Thanks again!

  • limpet profile image

    Ian Stuart Robertson 2 years ago from London England

    merrie we meet

    Rather than spend my recent birthday (which happened to fall on a holiday this tyme) i decided to venture out of Olde London towne and stay overnight in what was formerly a coaching inn between London and Oxford. The back garden is one of the best that i have ever seen (outside of the Royal Horticultural college in Hertfordshire) and maintained by just one landscaper. Imagine a carpet of moss, geometricaly designed flower beds. Even a plot for every herb you can think of and of course the ancient beech trees. This garden has a southerly aspect so you can observe the eerie sunrise and glorious sunsets. Bless.

  • suzettenaples profile image
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    Suzette Walker 2 years ago from Taos, NM

    limpet: I love English gardens and the English countryside which is one of the most beautiful in the world. I would love to see the garden you refer to. What a great way to spend your birthday at a coaching inn. Beautiful dreams!

  • limpet profile image

    Ian Stuart Robertson 2 years ago from London England

    merrie we meet

    If you wish to view superb imagery of this garden simply 'click on' the Bull at Gerrards Cross and i guarantee you should be delighted. Smaller though in comparison to the Royal Horticultural Society's Capel Manor College in Herts. Both locations are well within an hours journey from Olde London towne.

    Bless

    the Limpet

  • suzettenaples profile image
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    Suzette Walker 2 years ago from Taos, NM

    limpet: You are such a well of knowledge here! I love faerie gardens (which I have seen on-line and facebook) They are so charming. I have heard of the Royal Horticultural Society through Elizabeth Gilbert's novel, The Signature of all Things. There is a video of her visiting there for research for her novel. How fortunate that you live nearby and can visit it anytime you want. Thanks so much for forwarding me so much information about these gardens. Most appreciated. Why don't you write a hub or two about these gardens?

  • limpet profile image

    Ian Stuart Robertson 9 months ago from London England

    merrie we meet

    Last night's harvest moon heralded the start of a new season, what we call autumn. A change in the weather has already begun.

    Bless

  • suzettenaples profile image
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    Suzette Walker 9 months ago from Taos, NM

    Yes, merrie we meet! Yes, the weather is changing here also. Crisp weather in the am and pm and warm in between. Slowly the leaves are changing. Autumn is a favorite season of mine!

  • limpet profile image

    Ian Stuart Robertson 9 months ago from London England

    merrie we meet

    Now with autumn upon us i wear a heavier jacket when rambling (hiking) in the woods and across wildflower meadows. Alas the weight of the extra clothing makes it for slower progress along the pathways and animal tracks (trails).

    Bless.

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    Suzette Walker 9 months ago from Taos, NM

    Yes, merrie we meet limpet. Autumn is my favorite time of the year to go hiking. I have done some here in Taos and it is beautiful. The leaves are just starting to turn beautiful colors and it has cooled down and makes hiking so much more enjoyable. I am glad to hear your are hiking in the woods and meadows of England. I love wildflowers and would love to see then in the English countryside.

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