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Good and Bad Query Letter Rejections

Updated on March 25, 2015

A Rather Silly Question

Does anyone truly enjoy being rejected?

Rejection is cold. It is a knife to the back. It is the cold slice of steel through flesh, the disembowelment of another, using words as the weapon of choice.

To a writer, rejection just may be the end of a writing career, for many writers have what we can safely call “fragile egos.”

So you can be excused if you read the title of this article and found yourself just a bit confused. How is it possible that rejection could be good? Is there really any benefit to having your heart cut out and served to you on a platter?

Yes, there is!

It all depends on the type of rejection and how it is handled by the rejected.

Listen, if you query editors, agents, or publishers, the first thing you need to understand is that you will be rejected. There is no last minute reprieve, no midnight call from the governor staying your execution…you will be rejected!

It helps immensely knowing that going in.

The next thing you need to know is that, not only will you be rejected, but you will be rejected often.

The best hitter in professional baseball fails seven times out of ten. Compared to that hitter, a writer who sends query letters in hopes of being published is mired forever in the minor leagues, because the failure rate is closer to 90%. On a good day he hits .100.

How’s that for a slap of reality?

So I think it’s important that a writer understand what a good rejection looks like. If he/she is going to receive so many rejections, it would be beneficial to at least find some good in a few of them, right?

Let’s march forward and see what a good rejection letter looks like. I’m going to share a couple of my own rejection letters and tell you why I consider each of them “good” rejection letters.

The face of rejection
The face of rejection | Source

The Good

Hi William,

Thank you for your patience with me, and for giving me a chance to consider your project. I've gone through your query and your sample pages, and unfortunately I am going to have to pass as it just doesn't feel like the right project for me at this time. Please remember that this is a highly subjective industry, and what doesn't work for me is probably exactly what another agent may be looking for. It only takes one yes to get you in the door!

With that in mind, here is a link to Chuck Sambuchino's agents blog to help you - he blogs about new agents in the field, and interviews others so you have a better chance of finding one that is perfect for you.

I wish you all the best in your search!

Sincerely,

Naomi Davis

Literary Agent, Inklings Literary Agency

What a great rejection this one is. This is like having the most beautiful girl in school tell you no, she can’t go to the dance with you, but she would love to go out with you another time. Naomi not only read some of my sample pages, but she wrote a personal note giving me advice for the future. Yep, this is a good one.

Let’s take a look at another.

Dear Bill,

Thank you for your query, which my readers and I have considered carefully. While we all agreed this project has very strong potential, I have reluctantly decided to pass as it is not a perfect fit for my list at this time. And please note that we can only provide specific editorial feedback to our clients.

I appreciate the opportunity to read and consider your work. Should you have another project in future which you are also looking for representation we ask that you consider resubmitting that work to us as I would be pleased to receive it.

Yours sincerely,

Stephanie Sinclair

This is a bonanza. This is like getting money in the mail. This is a warm caress from a beautiful woman. Yes, Stephanie rejected my manuscript, but she told me it has very strong potential AND she invited me to submit other work to her in the future. Believe me when I tell you that agents do not make that offer to every writer who contacts them. This is a keeper.

I’ve got one more for you and then we’ll take a look at the bad.

Dear Bill,

Thank you for letting me read your partial manuscript, which I read with interest. Your passion for your project certainly shines through.

However we're going to decline this at this time, as it’s not one for our lists. While you’ve set the scene with your three main characters and their background stories, I would have preferred immediate reference to the source of all his troubles: the books he’s written, the enemies he’s acquired. To me, starting off with this section makes his story much more effective in hooking the reader in.

The publishing industry is very subjective, so what may not work for us could be just what another agency is looking for. So we encourage you to continue your pursuit of publication.

In your search for the perfect agent you may want to check out Chuck Sambuchino's Guide to Literary Agents blog. We have found it to be a great resource for finding new agents that are looking to build their lists.

Thank you for considering us for your work and we wish you great success with your writing career.

All the best,

Jana Pleyto

Corvisiero Literary Agency

Note that although I was rejected in this letter, the agent took the time to point out a strength of the novel and also a helpful pointer should I decide to re-write it in the future.

My opinion of bad rejection letters
My opinion of bad rejection letters | Source

The Bad

Yes, I have received some bad ones as well. Let’s get it over with and then we’ll return to a more pleasurable discussion.

Thank you for your query to the P.S. Literary Agency; unfortunately, we don't feel like we're the right agency for your project.

Our agency receives over 1,000 queries per month and we only take on a few new clients per year. With the publishing industry being extremely competitive we need to feel a strong conviction when representing your work. While it is not for us another agent / agency may well feel differently.

We apologize for responding with a form email, but doing so enables us to respond in a timely manner. We wish you all the best for finding the perfect home for your work soon.

P.S. Literary Agency

Totally impersonal….a form letter….leaves me to wonder if this agent even bothered to read my letter.

Can you stomach another?

Thank you for considering Victoria Sanders & Associates as a potential agency to represent your work. We have reviewed the material you sent and we regret that we will not be offering to review your work further at this time. Please know that we are very selective with the materials that we request. We encourage you to keep writing and we wish you every success. Please forgive this impersonal note. We receive a tremendous number of queries and are forced to focus our attention on a limited number of projects.

Kind regards,

Victoria Sanders

Again, this one leaves me feeling as cold as a dead fish. This is like that same Homecoming Queen not only rejecting you but slapping you in the face before she leaves.

It only takes one acceptance to make your writing life brighter
It only takes one acceptance to make your writing life brighter | Source

Back to the Good News

This is probably a great time to share one last piece of good news with you, so here it is: the fact that you have a manuscript and you can query agents and publishers makes you special. There are very few of us in the world. Be proud of that fact.

And one more piece of good news for you: lightning only has to strike once for a writer. If the right agent reads your work and is impressed, new doors will open for you, and those new doors may open onto a world you never imagined.

It only takes once!

Get out there and start knocking on those doors of opportunity.

2015 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

“Helping writers to spread their wings and fly.”

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    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Glimmer. If this helped you in some way then my work is done. :)

    • Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

      Glimmer Twin Fan 2 years ago

      Wow what a difference between the good and the bad. I need to rethink how I send office correspondence as I tend to be short and to the point, but I can see where a personal touch really makes a difference.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you drbj...I agree. Letting someone down easily is just as easy to do as letting them down hard, and it just might pay dividends in the end for everyone.

    • drbj profile image

      drbj and sherry 2 years ago from south Florida

      Brava, Bill, to the authors of those 'good' examples of rejection letters. They know how to say No without rejecting you as a person and a writer. Thanks for sharing them.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Deb. Take it personally? I wouldn't have lasted this long if I did. :)

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 2 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      These days, one cannot take anything personally, just like you said. Keep on trying, and it will happen, just be prepared for anything. It could be could, but it could be warm, too.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Flourish, I don't know if they expected it, but they should have. LOL I agree with you, the first one is the kind of encouragement that writers need. Happy Easter my friend.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      I wonder if they ever considered that their "ding" letters would end up on the internet like this along with their names? That first one was downright candy -- beautifully crafted and makes you want to say "thank you" (for rejecting me).

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Nice analogy, Ann...or was that a metaphor? Sigh! I have so much to learn about this writing gig. :)

      Thank you of course. Rejection feeds my soul and makes me try harder. Weird how that works out, isn't it?

      Bill

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 2 years ago from SW England

      How did I miss this one? No idea!

      Superb advice as always and so encouraging. It doesn't take a lot longer for someone to write a personal letter rather than a form, does it? If they want writers then they should treat them well; I wouldn't bother re-submitting to those who send out the impersonal replies.

      No point in feeling sorry for ourselves. If we're busy then we don't sit crying over rejection; there are plenty other fish in the writing pool and one day we'll land a great big fat one who'll feed us well.

      Have a great evening, bill!

      Ann

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you for the kind words, Anna! Believe me, if I ever strike gold with an agent I'll tell everyone about it. You'll probably be able to hear me screaming in Scotland. :)

    • Anna Haven profile image

      Anna Haven 2 years ago from Scotland

      The proof of your writing ability is in the fact you are able to share your vulnerability. To be comfortable in one's own ability allows for growth and moving forward and an awareness that they just haven't found the right fit, yet. It is only a matter of time. One letter to the right person and everything will change forever. I look forward to hearing all about it Bill.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You summed it up perfectly, Vellur. Thank you my friend.

    • Vellur profile image

      Nithya Venkat 2 years ago from Dubai

      Rejection letters should not put us down and we must keep on trying and believe that one flash of lightning will come our way. Thank you for sharing this.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Heidi, I have no words concerning your weather. Any encouragement I could give at this point would sound hollow. LOL Happy Weekend and thanks to you.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      No sweat, Manatita! I don't discourage easily. Thank you my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      My pleasure, Dora! We all learn from each other, or at least that's how I see a community functioning. Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Cat! I appreciate that very much. Best of luck with your writing journey.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Kristen! Actually, I don't mind rejections and that was the point of this. It's all part of the writing process. Best wishes on your attempts.

    • heidithorne profile image

      Heidi Thorne 2 years ago from Chicago Area

      The "good" are great role models for anyone in business who needs to walk away from potential clients who are not a good fit. Thanks for sharing the great examples. (BTW, we got snow AGAIN this AM here in Chicago. Really? Anyway, Happy Weekend!)

    • manatita44 profile image

      manatita44 2 years ago from london

      Yes, some query readers try to help even in rejection. Others can be quite cold. Persevere Bro. I'm sure that you will be rewarded.

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Isaac Weithers 2 years ago from The Caribbean

      Sharing your rejection letters is an encouragement. They help us see that rejection does not mean "not good." Thanks for your practical lessons.

    • cat on a soapbox profile image

      Catherine Tally 2 years ago from Los Angeles

      Thanks so much for sharing what to expect. It gives hope to those who have been rejected and courage to those of us who hesitate to try to move forward. Congratulations on your success w/ Resurrecting Tobias.

      All the best,

      Cat:)

    • Kristen Howe profile image

      Kristen Howe 2 years ago from Northeast Ohio

      Bill, I feel your pain. I've gotten the similar responses to my query letters in over the years, since 2010 I believe. It's over 100+ I would say. I hate form rejections of these kind: not a right fit, not right for me, etc." I love personalized rejections, which is a rarity. I've gotten two Rs this week on one ms, which I hope it can lead to a R&R (revise and resubmit). Hang in there! (I'll be doing a query letter series on HP sometime this spring.) Voted up for useful!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      My pleasure, Rebecca. Thanks for traveling along on my journey with me.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Brilliant indeed, Maj! I use those writers as inspiration. If they could be rejected then who am I to be discouraged? We just keep plugging along, my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Alicia. I think they are great, too.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks for sharing that, Molly! I expect form letters but that doesn't make them any more palatable. When you get one from a real person it does tend to take the sting out of rejection.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Faith, it's not a dumb question. Lists refer to the types of books the represent, and I follow their recommendations, and my book may fall within the genres they represent but still not be a good match for them. :) At times, armed with information, we are still unarmed. :)

      blessings always my friend

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Linda, when you are prepared for it and expect it, the ego manages to stay healthy. LOL Thanks for stopping by.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Not at all, Catherine! We take the good out of situations like this one and keep moving forward. Thank you!

    • rebeccamealey profile image

      Rebecca Mealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

      Thanks for sharing your query responses, and letting us know just how the publishing world works!

    • travmaj profile image

      travmaj 2 years ago from australia

      I suppose they know the power they hold these writers of rejections - I'm thinking, if they're having a bad day, they might miss a winner. Yes, I have the usual collection of good and bad. I found a 'good' one the other day from many years ago that I'd simply ignored. I have no idea why I didn't follow up. Ah well,

      J K Rowlings was rejected a dozen or so times and told not to quit her day job. And here's to e e cummings after many rejections remembering his rejectors in No Thanks. Brilliant.

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Even though they were rejection letters, I think your "good" rejections were great, Bill! Thanks for sharing the letters and your advice.

    • Molly Layton profile image

      Molly Layton 2 years ago from Alberta

      This is really interesting. Rejection notices can range from painful to disappointing, especially when it is clear that the person sending the note did not give a hoot about you and your work. I think sometimes rejection notices have a silver lining of "keep making this better", but I have experience with other disciplines where rejection is basically instant.

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 2 years ago from southern USA

      Hi Bill,

      Thank you for sharing your rejections letters and the good ones are truly good for rejection letters. Are you only submitting your query letters to attractive females ... : ) for it is hard to constantly be turned down by women. What do they mean not appropriate for "our lists" ...exactly to what lists are they referring, and I am asking because I wonder if one knew what kinds of lists they have, you can search out those you believe would fit on their lists in lieu of them telling you? I know, dumb question, but I am not clear about what they mean by "their lists"?

      Keep fighting that good fight and write, write, write! I look forward to reading about the time when you receive an acceptance letter, if that is what they are called.

      Peace and blessings always

    • Sunshine625 profile image

      Linda Bilyeu 2 years ago from Orlando, FL

      I am sure being rejected is a blow to the ego, but I always think of how many times Stephen King was rejected and then I think being rejected ain't all that bad! The rejection letters you shared were diplomatic and tastefully done. Let 'em down gently...very thoughtful. Carry on now :)

    • CatherineGiordano profile image

      Catherine Giordano 2 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Very interesting. I hope you don't mind me saying I enjoyed your rejection letter. No this is not schadenfreude--taking pleasure in another's misfortune-- but because I learned a lot. BTW, perhaps a masochist enjoys rejection letters.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I like that, Mary....at least it will mean you submitted something...true words there. Thank you and I hope to hear about your rejections soon.

      Happy Thursday to you dear friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Ruby. I hope you are right. I hate to see good writers give up before the miracle happens.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I'm sorry to hear that, Nell. I think that book needs to see the light of day once again. Hopefully you'll bring it out, dust it off, and give it a go.

    • tillsontitan profile image

      Mary Craig 2 years ago from New York

      Here you are again Bill, keeping us shaking and moving. I'm a bit embarrassed to say but I'm actually looking forward to my first rejection letter, that will at least mean I have submitted something!

      The good, bad, ugly, and wonderful sides of writing are all here. It is how we handle them and how we learn from them. Blessings and have a Happy Thursday.

      Voted up, useful, awesome, and interesting.

    • always exploring profile image

      Ruby Jean Fuller 2 years ago from Southern Illinois

      Well I never wrote a query letter, so I haven't been hurt, but I do feel for all writers. It must hurt to receive a rejection. I know your pep talks will help all who want to write and have a book published. Thank's again Bill...

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 2 years ago from England

      Hi Bill, oh I remember them well! I wrote a book back in the 80s on an old typewriter, I got a few of those horrible rejection letters, and the book is still in the drawer in copy form! it just totally blew away any thought of writing a good book, maybe if I had received one of the good letters it may have been different, thanks, nell

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You are very welcome, Bill. Thank you for stopping by.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      LOL...Jo, that is priceless. I love his response and who could blame him for trying? Thanks for a very good laugh this rainy Wednesday. Blessings always, my friend.

    • Homeplace Series profile image

      William Leverne Smith 2 years ago from Hollister, MO

      Those "good" rejection letter have to give you a lot of hope for that one positive response, as well. You just need to "get to" that right agent. Thanks for sharing these - very valuable reminders for every writer. ;-)

    • tobusiness profile image

      Jo Alexis-Hagues 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

      Bill, the good rejection letters are thoughful and encouraging, they sort of reminded me of an interview I attended in the 80s for a modelling job, although not as subtle. The job was for a sexy dancer for a television ad and LP sleeve. The chap who interviewed me, said that I looked great, but far too sweet for what they needed, then he asked me out on a date. :)

      Thank you for this, I'll make a start on the skin thickening process. Another very helpful hub. My best always.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you dohn...I love that story about London. I use it as inspiration when I'm feeling down.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I sure hope so, Deb, and in the meantime, I think I'll keep writing. :) Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Melissa. I think a lot of writers downplay the fact that they actually wrote a book...that is a huge accomplishment and one should be proud of it.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Kathleen, I love your goal...to simply enjoy the process. It is so easy to get wrapped up in the need for acceptance, when the enjoyment should come from doing something we love doing. Thanks for sharing your thoughts. I suspect many feel the same way.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Very true, Larry. I hate it when they don't respond. I understand it but I hate it. :)

    • dohn121 profile image

      dohn121 2 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York

      An excellent insight as to how the publishing (and for many others more) non-publishing world works. I remember when reading about Jack London that he hung his rejection slip during the Christmas season as ornaments. You've certainly have been blessed with some good responses to your submitted work, billybuc so keep it up. Thanks for sharing this one!

    • DeborahNeyens profile image

      Deborah Neyens 2 years ago from Iowa

      You should be very encouraged by the feedback you've received, Bill. I know you are going to find the right match for your book one of these days!

    • mpropp profile image

      Melissa Propp 2 years ago from Minnesota

      Thanks for sharing the both the good and the bad query responses. I found that really interesting. Although form letters do leave you cold, you can always look on the bright side... you never received a non-form letter that says something horrible like "i didn't like it and i doubt anyone else will." And I totally loved your summary, because it is so true. If you are at a point where you have a manuscript completed and ready to query, you have already accomplished more than many many others. Very inspiring!

    • profile image

      Kathleen Kerswig 2 years ago

      Thank you for sharing about rejection letters and the wide variety of responses we may receive as we pursue our writing. I'm learning that I love to write, regardless of the feedback I might receive. I'm now working on releasing the need to have specific outcomes so I can simply enjoy the process and my journey. Great hub! ~ KK

    • Larry Rankin profile image

      Larry Rankin 2 years ago from Oklahoma

      There is one thing worse than a form rejection, when they don't bother to respond at all.

      Yes, rejection is never great, but at least it's a bit of a lift when they let you know you're in the ballpark.

      Useful article.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Keep pushing, Frank. It only takes one acceptance. I keep telling myself that daily.

      Thanks, buddy.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sherri, that was a horrible thing for that mag to say to you. No way is that the norm, but I can certainly understand why it wounded you so....get back on the horse and ride again.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      My pleasure, Kim. The battle continues, my friend. Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Very true, Pop. Now I'd like to feel fabulous about a letter buying my book. :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      M.T. what a great comment. I love your analogy about the abusive relationship. I think it is so hard for agents to sell a book to a publisher these days that they practically ignore new novelists and go with established writers. It really is harder and harder for a new novelists to break into this game. Best wishes to you and thank you for sharing your thoughts.

    • Frank Atanacio profile image

      Frank Atanacio 2 years ago from Shelton

      Billybuc, I have an entire drawer filled with rejection letters.. but like a man on the prowl..I keeping pushing, thank you again for being something to lean on when the end of the rope seems near... bless you bro

    • sherrituck profile image

      Sherri Tuck 2 years ago from Virginia

      I received a rejection for one of my poems that stated that while the magazine appreciated my submission, the magazine had "standards" to uphold. Ok, that made me feel like crap. When I am rejected, I often compare my work to the work featured in publication that rejected my work. For some reason, I obsess over why my work was not good enough yet this poem or story was good enough. I have this practice to be dangerous.

    • klidstone1970 profile image

      இڿڰۣ-- кιмвєяℓєу 2 years ago from Niagara Region, Canada

      The highs and lows of pursuing a worthwhile dream. Thank you for sharing and reminding us to keep moving forward and putting things into perspective.

    • breakfastpop profile image

      breakfastpop 2 years ago

      Some of the finest authors in the world have wallpapered their offices with rejection letters. When I get a handwritten note from an editor, I feel fabulous!

    • M. T. Dremer profile image

      M. T. Dremer 2 years ago from United States

      I just recently wrote a very similar hub (about how to deal with agent rejections), and it's good to see I'm not alone. Rejections can feel very personal, so I thank you for sharing some of yours with us. It is my perception that there is a chasm between literary agents and new authors. Or perhaps a disconnect, where their focus on the business side of things has distanced them from the craft of writing. I've shopped around two different novels to literary agents, and both times it left a sour taste in my mouth. I feel like I'm in an abusive relationship, doing everything I can to get their attention, but falling short even when I meet their requirements.

      That's not to say that an agent SHOULDN'T focus on the business side of things (it's kind of their job). But the difference between writing as a craft, and writing as a business, is jarring. Take an art form that is deeply personal to you, then hack it down to buzzwords and statistics. It feels undignified and it forces the writer to use a skill that has nothing to do with their craft (salesmanship). It creates an unwelcoming statement that says; if you can't master self-marketing, then you'll never be a real author.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Yes they are, Sha, and the happy dance has been danced....and then it's back to submitting. It seems to be an endless process, but it only takes one to make it all worthwhile.

      Thank you Sha and Happy Wednesday to you.

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 2 years ago from Central Florida

      Bill, your "good" rejection letters are awesome. Not only are they personalized, but you've been invited back and one even gave you some suggestions. Even though they are rejections, I'd be doing the happy dance. Very promising and encouraging, huh?

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Aww, thanks Janine. I appreciate you being here daily and sharing your thoughts. I'm raising a toast to both of us, that we may never be rejected again.

    • Janine Huldie profile image

      Janine Huldie 2 years ago from New York, New York

      Bill, I too have seen my fair share of good and bad rejections letters and you are right if I have to be rejected, which as writers we have to deal with, then I would much rather be rejected properly and definitely not a form letter by any means. Thanks for sharing the examples of each here today and of course wishing you a wonderful day now.