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Hardbound Books vs. E-Books & Physical Bookstores vs. Online Bookstores

Updated on August 1, 2017
lovebuglena profile image

Lena Kovadlo is a writer for various content sharing websites. She's an author of 10 books and helps other authors publish their books.

Our world has gotten so technologically advanced that now we can read and enjoy books, of all genres and topics, without actually opening up a hardbound book. Who would have thought that this could actually be possible?

Just like songs that can be downloaded, books can be downloaded as well. These have come to be called e-books. They are downloaded onto the computer or better yet to special gadget devices like Kindle and Nook that allow us to read books on the go, no matter where we are. Very convenient isn’t it? Why carry a book with you, which is probably bulky or heavy, when you can carry a pretty slim gadget, like Kindle, with you that will actually allow you to enjoy your favorite book, and not just one but many. A pretty convenient thing, especially if you are going on vacation.

Yes, I am up with the technological advances, and I am into certain technological gadgets like the iPod, that allows me to have a huge collection of albums and songs without having to actually carry physical CDs with me, but when it comes to books, gadgets like Kindle and Nook are not on my list.

I have nothing against these devices; I just prefer hardbound books to e-books. There is nothing like holding a hardbound book in my hands and leafing through its many pages. Ah and I cannot forget that indescribable book scent (especially from older books) that I can never get enough of; a scent that is obviously missing from those convenient e-books. Even the whole reading process is that much more enjoyable when I hold a hardbound book in my hands, than if I were to read a book online or on one of those gadgets.

Oh and what about buying books? Of course there are two options here – go to an actual bookstore or shop online. I will admit that I did buy books online a number of times in the past, but that was only because I had no time to go to an actual bookstore to get the books; and in a few instances, those books were only available online so I had no choice but to get them online. Those few cases aside, I prefer to go to a physical bookstore, again for its indescribable book scent and for the ability to touch hardbound books and leaf through them. There is also that feeling of being transported into this secluded place where I am happy and at peace; where I have all the time in the world to just unwind and escape into the creative minds of the authors and their stories that have been imprinted on paper for endless generations to uncover. There is just nothing like it. A feeling like no other; a feeling I can never get when I shop online. If I could go into a bookstore and spend an entire day there I sure would. It is actually hard for me to leave a bookstore once I actually go to one. I just don’t want to leave and it takes a lot of willpower to say “hey, it’s time to go…”

Reading is a passion of mine, and, if I had endless storage room, I would buy every book I read. Unfortunately that is not the case, so I have resort to getting most books from the library (that I return when I’m done) and be selective in the books I actually buy.

As you have already found out, I do not own a gadget like Kindle; and I do not download or buy e-books. That is just not me. I am a hardbound book fan and a fan for life. So long as hardbound books exist, and I am sure they will not be vanishing in this lifetime, I will always choose hardbound books when I feel like reading a book. There is nothing like it.

What kind of books do you prefer?

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© 2010 Lena Kovadlo

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    • lovebuglena profile imageAUTHOR

      Lena Kovadlo 

      6 years ago from Staten Island, NY

      Wow! Congrats! Maybe I will try the kindle fire at one point. Tempting... but not caving in yet. hehe.

      What kind of kindle do you have???

    • profile image

      nikki 

      6 years ago

      iI i always said I prefer to hae a real book bt since I was given a kindle as a present it has opened up a whole new world of books I wouldn't usually know about to buy or get free.

    • lovebuglena profile imageAUTHOR

      Lena Kovadlo 

      8 years ago from Staten Island, NY

      kaltopsyd - Thanks for your feedback. There is a small part of me that is now tempted by the Kindle, but it is not worth it to buy one because I don't buy a lot of books.

      Lena

    • kaltopsyd profile image

      kaltopsyd 

      8 years ago from Trinidad originally, but now in the USA

      As much as I prefer holding an actual book in my hand and then proudly adding it to my little home library, I'm beginning to yearn a Kindle. The convenience appeals to me. Great Hub.

    • lovebuglena profile imageAUTHOR

      Lena Kovadlo 

      8 years ago from Staten Island, NY

      Mike - There is nothing like holding a hardbound book in your hand. And the experience is that much better reading a hardbound book than an e-reader like Kindle, but I do agree that Kindle is very convenient especially for those that travel or read on the go.

      Lena

    • Mike Lickteig profile image

      Mike Lickteig 

      8 years ago from Lawrence KS USA

      I also enjoy reading a real book, and I hope Kindle and other e-book readers will supplement but never replace a "real" book. There are certainly advantages to the new technologies, but I would rather not lie in bed or relax on my couch with an e-reader. Not yet, at least.

      Thanks for another good post.

    • lovebuglena profile imageAUTHOR

      Lena Kovadlo 

      8 years ago from Staten Island, NY

      Rebecca E. - Thanks.

      Lena

    • Rebecca E. profile image

      Rebecca E. 

      8 years ago from Canada

      hardbound books I love totally agree with you, there is something about them. consider this bookmarked and stumbled Upon.

    • lovebuglena profile imageAUTHOR

      Lena Kovadlo 

      8 years ago from Staten Island, NY

      SimeyC - yes I have seen audio books in the library but never opted to get one. I have not been to the library in a long while though since I have been reading the Twilight Saga and some other books I bought at B&N. Once I am finished with Breaking Dawn (the 4th book from the Twilight Saga) I will head to the library and check some audio books out. Might be interesting.

      Lena

    • SimeyC profile image

      Simon Cook 

      8 years ago from NJ, USA

      lovebuglena: my experience with Audio books has been excellent. Most of the ones I've listened to have been read by accomplished readers who bring 'character' to the book by adding 'voices' to the individual characters. The US audio-book versions of Harry Potter are fantastic (far batter than the award winning UK versions!) - and really enhance the story.

      I used to watch a show called Jackenory as a kid where they read a book in a week - but they added 'character' voices - it's one of the things that actually got me into reading!

      You should try just one - they are free from the library - you usually can get the CDs or even download to an mp3 player!

    • lovebuglena profile imageAUTHOR

      Lena Kovadlo 

      8 years ago from Staten Island, NY

      SimeyC - You have actually mentioned something in your comment I overlooked in my hub and that is audio books. I have never actually listened to an audio book, so not sure of the kind of experience that would bring but I have this feeling that if I were to listen to an audio book that I would probably lose interest in it.

      Yes, the convenience of gadgets, like Kindle, is that we can store many books in one fairly small device and read whatever we want when we want it. I give props to that. Still hardbound books are my reading of choice. Physical books are physical books. You never know what can happen to tech devices. They can malfunction or stop working or you can lose things you downloaded onto them. The physical book will always be there so there is no worry of losing something you really enjoy reading.

      Lena

    • SimeyC profile image

      Simon Cook 

      8 years ago from NJ, USA

      I am a huge reader - I have read at least 1000 books over the last 30 years - probably a lot more. However, as I get older and I seem to be more involved in work and life I seem to read less. However, as I have a 3 hour total commute during the day, I have downloaded a lot of audible books from the library thus I can keep 'reading'.

      The only advantage I see of the Kindle or other e-readers is the ability to store books - over time I've had to get rid of most of my books as I simply don't have the room to store them - if I had a Kindle I would have been able to re-visit all the old ones I have forgotten! I do still like a real book though - especially in front of a nice raging fire with a glass of wine!

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