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How To Write Nonfiction Using Fiction Techniques

Updated on February 12, 2014

Can You Write an Interesting Nonfiction “story”

To me, the greatest pleasure of writing is not what it's about, but the inner music that words make.

Truman Capote


Back in 1990 I read a Civil War trilogy written by Bruce Catton. It was an eye-opening experience for me.

Here were three books that were essentially history books, but they were written like novels. It was fascinating….it was exhilarating….and yes, it was liberating.

Since that time, of course, I have read many more books similarly written….”In Cold Blood” by Truman Capote…..”The Stranger Beside Me” by Ann Rule….and I have become interested in some common elements that they all share.

Nonfiction does not have to be boring. It does not have to be mundane or dry or lifeless. In the hands of a good writer, nonfiction can be every bit as spell-binding as fiction, but it won’t happen unless the writer takes care of the following elements.

Real-life people are every bit as interesting as fictional characters
Real-life people are every bit as interesting as fictional characters | Source

Develop Characters

Perhaps no other element is as important as characterization. In fiction, the writer must bring to life fictional characters. In nonfiction, the writer must bring to life real people. In other words, in fiction, characters are real people; in nonfiction, real people are characters.

Readers want to relate to characters. Readers want to relate to real people. It is your job as a writer to see that this happens. Describe the physical characteristics of the people in your book or story; describe their mannerisms; give them specific speech patterns; and give them background and history.

Make the dialogue crisp and meaningful
Make the dialogue crisp and meaningful | Source

Make Dialogue Come Alive

“Like anything else that happens on its own, the act of writing is beyond currency. Money is great stuff to have, but when it comes to the act of creation, the best thing is not to think of money too much. It constipates the whole process.

Stephen King


There is a purpose to dialogue, whether it be in fiction or nonfiction. Dialogue is never used as just a filler. Dialogue is a way to reveal personality. Dialogue can provide tension or provide humor. Dialogue is the engine that moves the story along, and dialogue protects the reader from the monotony of the narrator’s voice.

I like to think of dialogue as the icing on a cake.

If you are interviewing someone rather than writing historical fiction like Catton’s books, then dialogue cannot be invented, but it can lend quality through a good selection process. This means that the chronology of words said is not as important as how those words can be mixed and matched to provide the best dramatic context.

Develop Conflict and Plot

When writing about true events, the writer cannot make up plot. Plot is determined by what actually happened; a writer cannot decide to randomly change the truth so that his/her story is more interesting…..but…..there is conflict in most real-life events, and a good writer will bring that conflict to the limelight so that it drives the story along and gets the reader to invest emotions.

Find the conflict in your true story. What caused what and what are the effects; good vs evil; man vs nature; Democrats vs Republicans; and Big Business vs The Little Guy; this internal conflict, if presented well, will keep your readers interested and eager to find out more.

I am a big Henry David Thoreau fan, and “Walden” was his most famous nonfiction writing. Where is the conflict in “Walden?” How about civilization vs nature? How about the Tame vs the Wild? Now if I can find conflict in “Walden,” surely you can find it in your nonfiction story.

Don’t Forget Emotion

Never….Never….forget about emotions when writing nonfiction. Readers are real people; the people you are writing about in nonfiction are real people. Use this fact to capture the emotions of your readers. We all share common emotions, and that fact is crucial when writing any piece, whether it be nonfiction or fiction.

Think of it this way: if you were interested enough in a person or event to write about it, then share with your readers the elements that you found fascinating. Put another way, don’t just tell them but show them.

Remember that emotions stem from our senses. Tell your nonfiction story using the five senses so that it will appeal to your readers. Find the common denominator that we all can understand; if you do this, then even writing about the inventor of some technological wonder that is hard to understand will still be interesting.

Your voice is important in nonfiction
Your voice is important in nonfiction | Source

And Finally, Voice

You cannot hope to sweep someone else away by the force of your writing until it has been done to you.

Stephen King


An ordinary story becomes an extraordinary story because of the writer’s voice. Anyone can relate facts, but not everyone can relate those facts in an interesting manner that will capture the imagination of the reader.

Nonfiction becomes Art because of the way you tell it. Your attitudes towards the subject; your observances; and your perspective; all will determine whether your story about a famous chef is delicious or bland. Ten writers can write about the invention of the microchip, but only one or two of them will write that story in such a way that will capture the imagination of a reader….the determining factor is voice.

Now a Challenge for You

So many of my writer friends have written nonfiction; so many have written articles about local personalities or national celebrities; I would like to issue a challenge to those of you who have done so.

Go back to your previous articles….pick one at random….and re-write it using some of these techniques. Drop the boring approach and make your nonfiction come alive.

If you have not written nonfiction before, now is the time to try it. Choose a topic you know something about and you can get excited about….maybe something that happened in your life….and breathe new life into that story. Find the conflict; play to the emotions; add your voice; and make it as real to your readers as it was to you.

Is Any Of This Helpful To You?

See results

And That’s All There Is to It

In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed.

William S. Burroughs


I am being facetious of course. This is not easy. Perhaps that is why so few writers do it well.

I was laughing the other day because one of my readers stated that recipe writers will start thinking that I don’t like them because I am always picking on them. Really I am not picking on them; I simply want them to succeed by going the extra mile to make their recipe articles truly memorable.

The same is true with nonfiction writing. Any nimrod can relate the facts about an event, but what makes that event fascinating is a good writer who paid attention to the small details and who brought to life the story in general.

That is what I want from all of you; I want you to write nonfiction that will curl my toes and make me happy that I took the time to read your work. Really, now, isn’t that what all of you should want too?

2014 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

“Helping writers to spread their wings and fly.”

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    • Janine Huldie profile image

      Janine Huldie 3 years ago from New York, New York

      Great advice on writing no-fiction. So much of what I write on my own blog is pretty much non-fiction stories that happened to me or my family and I try very hard to use my own voice, as well as make the story have as much depth and emotion as I can. So, I thank you for letting me know I am hopefully doing something right when I do this. Now totally wishing you today as everyday a wonderful day ahead.

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 3 years ago from England

      Hi Billy, yes I totally agree with you. Take Phillipa Gregory for example. She writes about all the kings and queens of England, but her characters are so alive, flesh and blood, and it makes it fascinating. Her story of Catherine Howard, the 17 year old who married Henry VIII was so poignant that I still remember it now, great advice, and in fact these are the type of stories I love to read. As for dialogue I think thats much more important than background. Some writers, even fiction writers write too much background and I find it really boring, so great hub Bill!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Janine, reading your work is like talking to you face to face....and that is a wonderful experience. Thank you dear friend and I hope Wednesday is not too wild in the weather department.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Nell! We come across a writer who is exceptional writing nonfiction and we may not even recognize why that is....these elements are the reasons. Stay dry and thank you always.

    • Mr Archer profile image

      Mr Archer 3 years ago from Missouri

      Excellent work Bill. I try to follow these tidbits but sometime find myself off the track. Thanks for getting me back on track. Take care my dear friend. Blessings always.

    • breakfastpop profile image

      breakfastpop 3 years ago

      Pretty soon I will have a great textbook on writing thanks to you. Voted up useful and awesome!

    • Melovy profile image

      Yvonne Spence 3 years ago from UK

      I agree with what you say here Bill, especially about emotions. If we can't engage readers emotions we might as well not bother to write!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mike, I spend a great portion of my life off-track. The fun is in finding my way back on the rails. :) Thanks buddy and blessings to you in return.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      It's my pleasure breakfastpop...and you are appreciated.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Yvonne, so nice to see you again. Thank you and judging from your blog post you understand these elements very well.

    • carol7777 profile image

      carol stanley 3 years ago from Arizona

      I particularly enjoy true crime books and find by itself truth is stranger than fiction. But creating a narrative style that entices you into reading is an art. Great ideas as always....Maybe a tote bag "I am a writer" I just got this inspiration...ummmm

    • cecileportilla profile image

      Cecile Portilla 3 years ago from West Orange, New Jersey

      Love this Hub Billybuc! Great advice in every area. I am going to take your advice and rewrite one of my hubs that I believe readers did not pay much attention to because I did not give it enough emotion.

    • VVanNess profile image

      Victoria Van Ness 3 years ago from Prescott Valley

      What awesome points! You did a really great job showing how your tips for fiction can really transfer over for someone like me! Thanks! I always love reading your articles Billy!!

    • Jackie Lynnley profile image

      Jackie Lynnley 3 years ago from The Beautiful South

      I loved "In Cold Blood" and everything by Ann Rule, so maybe reading these writers, which I did before I ever dreamed of writing, is important; to read some really good writers before we try our hand at it. You have really good points always. Thanks for sharing! ^

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Carol, great idea...tote bags for a number of occupations....you might have hit on a winner. And thank you for taking the time to visit me once again.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Fantastic cecileportilla...I hope it works out well for you and you see a great increase in traffic.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Victoria; I am flattered and very grateful.

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 3 years ago from Central Florida

      Bill, paying attention to the small details is what really stood out for me in this post. The little things, such as Casey Anthony chewing on her hair as she listed to testimony can add a point of interest that someone may not have picked up. What issues caused her to chew on her hair? Why? Is it an expression of nervousness? Guilt? Fear?

      Great advice, Bill. Writing a non-fiction piece using fiction techniques is apt to have a fiction reader step into a different genre and actually enjoy it.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jackie, I hope you are staying warm and safe today. Oh yes, I am a firm believer that we must read the best if we ever want to write well....and Capote and Rule are two of the best in this genre.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sha, you just mentioned a very important point. If a nonfiction writer can win over a fiction fan, then great things have been accomplished. Thank you as always my friend.

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Isaac Weithers 3 years ago from The Caribbean

      First, the quotes from Stephen King are really powerful. Thank you for sharing them. Conflict and emotions make the story. Thank you for underscoring that.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You are very welcome, Dora, and thanks as always for stopping by. Conflict and emotions...I can't imagine telling a story that did not include those two elements.

    • Eiddwen profile image

      Eiddwen 3 years ago from Wales

      I began replying to this around an hour ago but electric went off with these strong winds and has only just come back on. As always a wonderful lesson. to read and remember . My memory is not brilliant these days but I seem to remember your lessons ; I think this says a lot. Thanks for sharing and keep them coming.

      Reddy.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Reddy Eddy....lost power here as well....tough, tough winter my friend. Thank you for your kind words....just tossing out stuff I learned long ago in hopes someone can use it.

      billy

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Great ways mentioned here and definitely an informative an helpful hub to many writers.

    • DeborahNeyens profile image

      Deborah Neyens 3 years ago from Iowa

      Great advice. In nonfiction, just like fiction, it's all about the story. BTW, I went to pin this to my writing advice board and got a notification that my Pinterest account has been locked down due to suspicious activity. I've been hacked! So I'll be back to pin after I've reset my password.

    • profile image

      DJ Anderson 3 years ago

      More great info, as always.

      Keepin' it short, today.

      I am right in the middle of the conflict on the island of Saipan.

      Do you know they had a big war, there!!??

      High school history was an hour to flirt with Bobby, or Jack, or well,

      you get the picture. I do not remember taking history in college. It was all math and science, and I don't remember it either.

      I am having to dig hard to bring this war to life in my novel.

      Great article, Bill!

      DJ.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you DDE!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Deb! There have been a few problems with Pinterest of late. I hope you get it straightened out.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      DJ, I taught history so yes, I remember there was a war there, but I look forward to learning more about it in your book. Get busy young lady and enjoy the rest of your day.

      bill......oh, and thank you! :)

    • kidscrafts profile image

      kidscrafts 3 years ago from Ottawa, Canada

      I so agree with you that it's possible to write interesting nonfiction (I didn't say that I can do it but I can certainly enjoy reading it). Usually I don't read nonfiction maybe because I read some books that were not interesting. I reconnected with non fiction with some books of Malcolm Gladwell and I love the way he writes. And now that I read your hub I suppose that he applies some of your suggestions!

      Another great hub! Thank you Bill!

      Have a nice afternoon!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      In writing, I've always been attracted to conflict and the inner dialogue. In the summer following high school, I worked at the town paper writing obituaries and weddings -- those flowery descriptions of what the bride wore and who was in attendance. I had to leave out all the juicy stuff I learned but boy did it ever draw me into the story behind the story. People would sometimes specifically ask for me to write up their life event because I could make it stand out. (Hell, there's something really unusual and exciting about a wedding reception that is held pool side at the Days Inn with Hardees ham biscuits when it ain't even morning.) Soon, the editors had me writing features, too.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Joelle, most of the really good nonfiction writers employ these elements. We just don't notice it because it is done so well. :) And yes, I think you could do it.

      It's been a good day so far; I hope yours has been as well.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Flourish, I love it. I think there is a fascinating story in each of us just waiting to get out; it doesn't surprise me that you found those stories covering weddings. Thanks for sharing that.

    • profile image

      sheilamyers 3 years ago

      Awesome advice! I always knew writing a hub meant adding something special which will make it stand out from all of the others about the topic, but I never gave a thought to the points you made. Maybe some of that comes through my writing or maybe it doesn't. All I know is I'm going to try to pay more attention to these things and incorporate them into my hubs. Thanks for the great advice.

    • always exploring profile image

      Ruby Jean Fuller 3 years ago from Southern Illinois

      Wonderful advice as always. I love reading nonfiction, Real life stories are the best whether sad or happy. Thank you Bill for all you do to help writers excel.

    • MizBejabbers profile image

      MizBejabbers 3 years ago

      Wonderful work, Bill, and yes, some of our historical characters really were “characters”. I wonder just how much of their character was a product of the writers of the time. Confederate General Jeb Stuart is a good example; Abraham Lincoln is another. (If we believe everything we read about Lincoln, then every word written about General Stuart has to be true!) I won't even get into Buffalo Bill Cody and Wild Bill Hickock.

      One of the most helpful classes that I took was feature writing (actually two, one as an undergrad and the other as a grad student.) They sent us out into the community to interview real people, and once I picked one of the most controversial men in the state, a state Supreme Court Justice well known for his rabble rousing. The nerve of me! I was just a shaky college student, but he put me right at ease and gave me a great interview. Since I was also working for the state’s largest newspaper at the time, the paper published my feature in the Sunday Edition. I got fan mail! My recommendation is to take a feature writing class if the opportunity arises. The class will really help to separate the fact from fiction and give a good idea how to work with real live characters. Dead ones are easy because they don’t talk back.

      @ Nell: Phillipa Gregory is one of my favorite authors, too. In fact I am working on a review of her book The Red Queen. She is famous for being an accurate fact checker, but she does bill her books as “historical faction”.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sheila, thank you as always. These are things most of us know but may have forgotten along the way. Just consider me your daily reminder...like some pop up ad on the internet. :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Awww, Ruby, thank you! I'll have a reflection hub for you tomorrow since I know you enjoy those much more.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      MizB, great comment as always. I echo your suggestion to take a feature writing class. Quite invaluable for serious writers. Fact or fiction...I think there are a great many "truths" that might fall short of that classification. If one believes everything about John Colter then the man must still be alive up in the Rockies. :)

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Great advice as always, dear Bill! I am for the most part a nonfiction writer, as I write about my life's trails and tribulations. I will keep these tips in mind when writing nonfiction.

      Up and more and sharing.

      Hugs and blessings to you and yours,

      Faith Reaper

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you, Faith, for the hugs and blessings. I can always use those. :)

      Hoping the rest of your work week goes smoothly.

      bill

    • Brian Prickril profile image

      Brian Prickril 3 years ago from Savannah, GA

      Bill, I'll never forget the day I bought a Haynes manual for my car. I'm not saying that it was a great work of writing. But as I read through it, I was impressed by how well it was written. It wasn't just some stale, robotic manual. It was like...beautiful somehow. And to this day, I still wonder who the hell wrote that thing.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Brian, what a great example. I have read things like that where I'm just blown away by the writing style on a subject that should have been boring. Thanks for that and stay safe in that ice storm.

    • heidithorne profile image

      Heidi Thorne 3 years ago from Chicago Area

      Since I only write nonfiction, I can definitely attest that using stories and fiction-style elements helps readers really understand the material. Writing about "boring" business concepts, some of them being pretty abstract, really needs some story-izing. Thanks for showing writers that nonfiction doesn't have to mean non-interesting!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Heidi, you are a perfect example and thanks for mentioning that. I hope you have thawed out in the Windy City; Spring is right around the corner. :)

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      Michelle Liew 3 years ago from Singapore

      Ah, finding that balance when writing non-fiction is the key! Thanks for sharing!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      My pleasure Michele; thanks for the visit.

    • MG Singh profile image

      MG Singh 3 years ago from Singapore

      Great post billy. You have the pulse in your fingers

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you MG....I appreciate it greatly.

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      Jo Alexis-Hagues 3 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

      Bill, thanks for this priceless information. They do say facts can be stranger than fiction, I guess a great deal depends on the skill of the writer as much as the story. Another one for my collection. I hope all is well with you, take care and my best as always.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jo, all is well indeed for me and I wish the same for you. Nonfiction can be exciting and dramatic and mysterious if written well. If not then it usually is just boring. :) Thank you my dear!

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      Ann Carr 3 years ago from SW England

      Funny, I was thinking about making a published magazine article of mine into a hub. I was going to do a straight transfer. Not any more! Now I'm going to 'refresh' it as you're suggesting here and I'll see if it produces a better read.

      I always try to make non-fiction interesting but I've never approached it before in the same way as fiction. Thanks for your advice, bill. I'll give it a go.

      More rain on the way for those poor people down on the Levels - think that's given me another non-fiction hub along fiction lines!

      Nearly the weekend! Off to another celebration; some poor sod's reached his 70th birthday (my partner's little brother, called Bill)!! Have a great evening, bill! Ann

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Well Ann, I hope I get to read those two articles that you have in mind. Please!!!!!!

      As for the 70th birthday celebration....four more years for this old man. My goodness, how is that possible? LOL Have a wonderful time my friend and thank you.

      bill

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 3 years ago from SW England

      You're only as old as you feel, bill!!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Well, Ann, I feel about forty, think like a twenty-five year old, and at times have the emotions of a teen. LOL Where does that fit on the age scale?

    • Dolores Monet profile image

      Dolores Monet 3 years ago from East Coast, United States

      Hi Billy - I love these suggestions. My first love was fiction writing, though I have not written any for quite some time. But your tips for adding the depth of emotion, and giving the work a unique voice can help me develop a more...oh well, heck, can push me towards just having more fun writing articles.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Well Dolores, thank you! You are a very good writer in my opinion; if these suggestions help you then fantastic.

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 3 years ago from SW England

      That makes you very young at heart with a great attitude!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, another visit from you...thank you....I am young at heart indeed and hope to stay that way for some time to come.

      Have a marvelous Friday my dear.

      bill

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      John Hansen 3 years ago from Queensland Australia

      Hey Bill, thanks for another great lesson. Even a lot of poetry is non-fiction but the readers sometimes have trouble knowing what is and isn't...lol. A non-fiction book I can recommend is "George and Arthur" by Julian Barnes. It is British and about Arthur Conan Doyle(the writer of Sherlock Holmes) and a case he solved in real life of George Edalji who was falsely accused and sent to prison. Because of Conan Doyle's detective work he was eventually release. It had me captivated and I really felt for the characters.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      John, thanks for the recommendation. I'll be going to the library this weekend so I'll check it out. Have a great weekend my friend.

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 3 years ago from Queensland Australia

      Actually it may be Arthur and George...lol. Hope you find it.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I'm sure I will, John; thanks again!

    • vkwok profile image

      Victor W. Kwok 3 years ago from Hawaii

      Interesting way to write nonfiction, bill. Thanks for sharing!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Interesting and effective, vkwok! Thank you!

    • tillsontitan profile image

      Mary Craig 3 years ago from New York

      Bill, you and Stephen King reiterate; A writer is a writer is a writer. Doesn't matter if its fiction or nonfiction it is still writing. As always your ideas are spot on and your example of "In Cold Blood" certainly makes your point well. I remember when I first read it I thought it was fiction!

      Voted up, useful, and interesting. And since the sharing buttons have appeared, pinned and shared.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Mary! Capote was brilliant when he wrote that book and like you, I thought it was fiction when I first started reading it. Yes, brilliant!

    • jainismus profile image

      Mahaveer Sanglikar 3 years ago from Pune, India

      That is a great idea. Very helpful hub. I am already using some of the techniques your have given here.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jainismus, thank you very much. It shows in your work that you use these techniques.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 3 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      This is quite a challenge but if we roll up our sleeves, and put out minds to it, I believe that it can be done.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Oh Deb, I've seen it done and so have you...but it does take some work and willingness. :) Thanks my friend and have a great weekend.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago from Texas

      Bill, this is fantastic, I need to have this said in just this way, too make me want to write something nonfiction. I am so glad I came to read this.

      I am going to write about my cousin, who is having a hard time.

      Thank you!

      Voted up, UAI and shared.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Wonderful Shyron; that is music to my ears. Thank you and I look forward to reading about your cousin.

    • Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

      Glimmer Twin Fan 3 years ago

      I'm not sure if what I write is considered nonfiction (I don't really think it is), but this interested me because of voice etc..... I could definitely apply these to the types of articles I write. Thanks! Trying to get back in the swing of things after a little break.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Well, Glimmer, it's good to have you back. Give this a try; it just might open up new avenues for you. Best wishes and thanks.

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