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Hurricane Story of Irene Downgraded to Tropical Storm

Updated on April 2, 2017
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A creative writer at heart, Janis was first published at age 11. Most of her poems express core issues of love, loss, trauma, and healing.

The Calm After the Tropical Storm

The trees are calm and still after the storm.
The trees are calm and still after the storm. | Source

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A Hurricane Story

"Welcome Irene"

The driving sound of the ripping wind, the feel of moving air on my face and forearms, brings my senses to attention as I lean on the bathroom windowsill, and invite Irene into my house.

What a precious and wonderful force of nature, giving proof to God's presence, in the pitch blackness of my backyard, except for the one house on the alley at a distance with a beaming porch light.

I don't need to see with my eyes to feel, hear, and smell the miracle of nature Irene brings, as she creates the swaying of massive trees and the occasional cracking of a weak branch at this sacred 1:00 am hour of the morning.

A huge gush of wind just blew in, cooling my skin with light sprinkles of rain, followed by another, through the screen, spraying my face ever so lightly, like nature's atomizer.

Small flickers of lightning introduce great wind gusts that make me smile, blessed to witness the awesome power of nature with no association with the destruction a hurricane can bring.

Oh Irene, so serene, so lovely, so shapely as you flow; so deadly, so natural, so commanding of respect, fear, and awe, as you pass through briefly, but memorably.

The Mesmerizing Power of a Storm

Whipping in different directions, the trees move back and forth, side to side, parting so reverently for your wind to pass between them. The oaks, maples, and pines, swirl, salute, bend, and bow down for Irene.

The rain has slowed down to a pitta-patta on the roof beneath me as the wind continues to kick up.

Separate pockets of air appear to blow independently as my ears can see distinct sounds of movement along distant paths coming from different corners of the yard.

My Window View of Calmness After the Storm

The next morning, I looked through the bathroom window sill at the calm atmosphere after the tropical storm.
The next morning, I looked through the bathroom window sill at the calm atmosphere after the tropical storm. | Source

Time Passes in the Wee Hours of the Night

It's 2:00 am now and the crickets are waking with song, accompanying the wind like an impromptu choir. They harmonize beautifully in three parts.

The fresh smells of rain and earth are blown upward by the wind gust, shooting the sweet aroma across my face and up my nostril. The air is damp, humid, and cool.

Is anyone else out there on a window sill tonight? Who joins me to feel this rare moment in history, this east coast rarity of nature called Irene? She performs for me with power and grace in this free theater with prime seating.

[A siren? Oh no, you're interrupting my pristine witnessing of nature at its finest. GO AWAY!]

I thank God, the Creator, for giving me the gift of stillness to receive the gift of movement in nature by way of Irene. (Close window, go to bed, can't sleep due to sounds of strong winds.)

Storm Viewed From the Window

A view through a bathroom window captures the aftermath of a bad storm.
A view through a bathroom window captures the aftermath of a bad storm. | Source

Hurricane Irene Downgraded to a Tropical Storm

© 2012 Janis Leslie Evans

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    • rcrumple profile image

      Rich 4 years ago from Kentucky

      Too many hurricanes endured, too many times they stirred, along the Gulf Coast way, dead of night and light of day, until we left the state, and heard of others fate, so no more 'canes and blows, face now damn tornadoes!

      I went thru many 'canes on the Gulf Coast in my 14 years there. Seriously, I don't miss not seeing them. Not as pleasant as some may think. Great Job!

    • janshares profile image
      Author

      Janis Leslie Evans 4 years ago from Washington, DC

      Wow, I bet. Thanks so much for sharing that. I love the creative comment.

    • Cardisa profile image

      Carolee Samuda 4 years ago from Jamaica

      Hey Jan, you can have your comments moderated where they have to be approved before they show..lol. You can do this in your account settings. This also helps you to keep out spam and negative feedback.

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