ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Kindle: Koncerns and Kommendations

Updated on December 15, 2019
Kindle
Kindle
Kindle with cover
Kindle with cover

Up, Down, Sideways - Or Buy?

Thanks to my wife, a Kindle was under my Christmas tree this year - thank you sweetheart. I’ve coveted a Kindle since they first came out but not enough to pay the prices they were asking then. My present was the new $79 model. I’m sure the more expensive Kindle has more bells and whistles, but this one satisfies my needs; it is a reader. .

I’m still trying to figure what all the buttons do, but now that the holiday season is over, I will have time to investigate the Kindle’s properties before settling down with a glass of wine and a good Kindle. Overall, I am delighted with my new Kindle, but I do have a Koncern or two.

Actually I have only one Koncern (make that two concerns; see second capsule) and lots of Kommendations. My Koncern is about a control that is sometimes described as a ‘5 way controller’ or a ‘5 way controller button .’

This is NOT a 5 way controller. It isn’t even a single button. The button in the middle is a control. The border surrounding the centre button is a separate control.


[My digital camera has the same system of operation, but the border is diamond shaped and is described as a 4 way controller. The button in the centre – which is marked ‘OK’ – is described as the ‘playback /OK button.’ The method of operation is obvious.]

Have a look at the Kindle photograph. How does it look to you? Of course it might just be my weird way of looking at things, but to me the arrows on the border are telling me where to press the centre button to go up, down, left or right. If you are a billiard player, think of the centre button as the cue ball, and consider giving that cue ball spin, or screw, or English, whichever way you describe it.

So if you are told to press the ‘5-way controller’ to go down, you would press the bottom part of the centre button. To begin with, you may press the border at the same time and end up going where you want to go, but the next time you press the central button you could be in the book menu and not press the outside border at the same time. So what, I hear you ask? The centre button is a one click purchase button; press it and you’ve bought a book


Did I accidentally buy a book this way? Who me? Of course I did, but the good part is that you can cancel the purchase as ‘an accidental purchase.’ Another good thing about this is that you don’t need to return the book to the store and plead for your money back; it simply disappears from your Kindle home page.

Press the surrounding border in the appropriate place, to go up, down, left or right. Be cautious as you use the outside button; it is easier to use if you use your fingernail and not your fingertip. If you use your fingertip you may end up pressing the centre button with the aforementioned result.

I’d also advise you to read the reviews of a book before you buy it. I made a mistake of not reading a review when I purchased my second book; it was a Jack Reacher novel and I couldn’t believe the price of $1.97. I did the ‘one click’ purchase and settled down to read about one of my favourite heroes. Just as I was thinking that every investigative problem was being solved very easily and wondering how the book was going to last much longer – it didn’t. I’d bought a short story. If I’d read the reviews I would have known this (apart from which, if something is too cheap to be true – it is).

I recommend that you order a free sample of a book before you buy it. The sample covers enough chapters for you to remember if you’ve read it before, and lets you know if it is the type of novel you like. Even if you don’t want to read the sample of a book by your favourite author, because you think it will spoil the book for you, ordering a sample can still be beneficial – let’s say you’ve read all of the author’s books but can’t remember their titles. Order a free sample and go to the ‘copyright’ page; if it was published recently, it’s a safe bet you’ve never read it before – if you’re not too sure, you can still read a few pages of the sample before deciding whether or not to buy the book.

Kindle Kommendations
To quote Amazon – The most elegant feature of a physical book is that it disappears while you're reading. Immersed in the author's world and ideas, you don't notice a book's glue, the stitching, or ink. Our top design objective is to make Kindle disappear — just like a physical book — so you can get lost in your reading, not the technology.

I was a bit iffy with this point of view. To me, the pages, the stitching and the glue are an essential part of reading. The pleasure of reading has a lot to do with the ambience of a brand new book, and the texture of the pages; can’t you just feel yourself snuggling in at the mere thought?

As I said, I was a bit iffy with Amazon’s point of view, until last night. I was reading a Harry Bosch mystery, and I needed to turn the page; automatically my hand went up to the top right corner of the Kindle, ready to turn a paper page. That brought me up short – so much for my ‘the ambience of a brand new book’ . Amazon had definitely made the Kindle disappear.

On the same 'turning the page' subject, you will find it easier to turn a page if you buy a cover for your Kindle. Most of the adverts show a Kindle being held on the bottom right hand corner as it is being read. Not only does this look good, it actually works, but it is awkward. It is sometimes necessary to put the Kindle down before you can turn the page.

Do yourself a favour and buy a cover for your Kindle. It is easier to hold the Kindle, and turn a page when you are holding the covered Kindle by the bottom, as if it was a paperback - especially so when you are reading in bed. But be careful how much you pay for the cover; some covers cost $39. I could have bought one for that price, but as my Kindle only cost $79, I baulked at that price. My cover cost a more realistic price of $6.99.

To me, the most pleasurable, agreeable and enjoyable part of a Kindle is never being without a book.

The Harry Bosch novel mentioned earlier – I went to bed early last night because I had a crappy cold. I took the Kindle to bed with me, but I’d forgotten I’d read the book that was already on it. Propping myself up on the pillows, I searched through Amazon’s author list until I found one of my favourite authors. One of the books was titled ‘The Drop.’ I wasn’t too sure about that one, so I ordered a sample, read the copyright page and discovered it was only published at the end of last year. I checked the reviews and ordered the book.

A minute later I was reading a brand new Michael Connelly book. Two minutes later, my cold, and the Kindle, disappeared as I entered Harry Bosch’s world.

Thank you Amazon

PS. If you have any shares in a company that makes bookmarks, I suggest you trade them in – soon. True, the Kindle will supply its own bookmark, but if you're like me, you will often forget to arrange it. There is no need to be concerned if you do forget - whatever page you were reading when you switched off your Kindle, will automatically re-appear when you turn it back on.

Happy Reading.

Clip-On Reading Light
Clip-On Reading Light
Reading Light attached to the Kindle
Reading Light attached to the Kindle

My Second Koncern

It's more of an irritation than a koncern. I discovered on a recent overnight, trans-ocean flight, that my particular Kindle has its limitations. Before leaving at 10.35pm, I loaded my Kindle with two novels; my idea being to settle back and contentedly read while the other passengers were sleeping or watching TV.

It didn't quite work that way. When the lighting was gradually reduced, I found that I couldn't read the Kindle as there wasn't enough light to see the page. What I had overlooked was the fact that the $70 model has no built in backlighting. I was reduced to either watching 3rd rate movies or trying to find a position that would allow me and my butt to sleep at the same time.

For the next part of my flight I was more prepared. I bought a small clip-on light at a dollar store - see photo. It worked perfectly. If you can't get to sleep on an overnight flight, I recommend it.

Happy Reading - and Flying

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment
    • John MacNab profile imageAUTHOR

      John MacNab 

      9 years ago from the banks of the St. Lawrence

      Hello mckbirdbks.

      How do you mean 'you don't mean to butt in YET?' Thank you very much for the kind wishes. It was only a looong lasting migraine - the kind that disorientates as well as flashes lightning bolts. It's difficutlt to see the monitor in that situation, so I usually toddle off to bed with a few painkillers, and stay there for a few days.

      Thank you again, young friend.

    • mckbirdbks profile image

      mckbirdbks 

      9 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

      Hello John, thanks, don't mean to butt in yet, here I am. Hope you are feeling better.

    • John MacNab profile imageAUTHOR

      John MacNab 

      9 years ago from the banks of the St. Lawrence

      Hi mckbirdbks. That seems to be really good advice you gave Enlydia. Keep up the good work, young man.

    • John MacNab profile imageAUTHOR

      John MacNab 

      9 years ago from the banks of the St. Lawrence

      Hi Enlydia Sorry for the delay, but I've been ill for a few days. To get back to reality - do you use 'Enlydia Listener' as the writer of your Kindle pieces, or is it a different name?

    • Enlydia Listener profile image

      Enlydia Listener 

      9 years ago from trailer in the country

      Thanks John (and mckbirdbks) I appreciate you taking the time. I know it is not your age level (the books) but I always wonder how that works from the buyers side of it.

    • John MacNab profile imageAUTHOR

      John MacNab 

      9 years ago from the banks of the St. Lawrence

      Hi Enlydia. I've only had time to look up Kindle re your Bunny book, but I couldn't find it. Later on today I'll maybe have time to sit down at the computer again and look up your other book.

      Cheers, John McN

    • mckbirdbks profile image

      mckbirdbks 

      9 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

      Enlydia Listener you are going to have to self market your books to have them found. All the social network avenues should get regular link posts directly to where your ebook is parked. This is not the time to be reserved, you have to scream it from the rooftops as it were.

    • Enlydia Listener profile image

      Enlydia Listener 

      9 years ago from trailer in the country

      Hi John, I have three children's books on Kindle (Bunny in the House series) and one book called "My Inner Safe Place" (about guided imagery). No sales yet, so I think no one is finding them.

      Thanks for the offer to see if they can be found...much appreciated.

    • John MacNab profile imageAUTHOR

      John MacNab 

      9 years ago from the banks of the St. Lawrence

      Hi Enlydia

      It's much like the awe I feel when I realise that someone has found and read one of my articles out of the millions of articles on Google.

      Let me know if there is a particular book that you are intersted in, and I'll check to see if it is included in the Kindle inventory, Enlydia.

    • Enlydia Listener profile image

      Enlydia Listener 

      9 years ago from trailer in the country

      Wow, that is wonderful and scary...wonderful for the reader...scary for the writer, knowing how difficult it will be to be found in such a huge list of books.

    • John MacNab profile imageAUTHOR

      John MacNab 

      9 years ago from the banks of the St. Lawrence

      Thanks for reading Enlydia. As far as I can see, Amazon gives a complete list of books, magazines and newspapers. It is also possible to borrow books but I haven't got that far yet - as far as I can see I would have to be a Prime Member in order to borrow for 'FREE.' btw, it costs $79.00 pa for the privilege of becoming a Prime Member.

      Looking at the Kindle just now, the books range from fiction to parenting and families - 1,012,049 books in all. I presume this will include a list of free and cheaper books.

    • Enlydia Listener profile image

      Enlydia Listener 

      9 years ago from trailer in the country

      Hi John, I have a lot of questions to ask about Kindles, since I don't own one, but write for the Kindles. Do they give you a list of all the possible books you can buy? Do they give you a list of free books, or cheaper books?

      Btw, I have seen tutorials on You tube on how to make your own Kindle cover...sounded like fun.

      I may have more questions later if you don't mind. Thanks.

    • John MacNab profile imageAUTHOR

      John MacNab 

      9 years ago from the banks of the St. Lawrence

      It is far too young to start school. In my young day we started at 5 years of age. The amazing thing is that she is revelling in it; but of course her older sister is there to protect her.

      Although their school is a country school where things are taught the old fashioned way, they are still being taught French and computing. All the parents from that class were asked to attend a meeting in December - the education department wanted to know why that particular school/class had the best tuition record in Ontario.

    • mckbirdbks profile image

      mckbirdbks 

      9 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

      A teacher I know is being pressured to raise the level which her handicapped kids are tested to. The administration train of thought is if 'she only worked harder' their test scores would go up - all part of the no child left behind mentality. I tell her to explain to the administration that her working harder will not increase the 'size of her students buckets'. Nothing funny about it except the ludicrous behavior of the overpaid administration.

      Three seems mighty young to begin school.

    • John MacNab profile imageAUTHOR

      John MacNab 

      9 years ago from the banks of the St. Lawrence

      Hi Mike. 'No child left behind?' It sounds like a great motto but I know what you mean. Our youngest granddaughter had to start school when she was 3, because if she'd waited until she was 4, she would have been a year behind.

      We just discovered Value Village a few weeks ago and I couldn't get over how little the books cost - soon they probably won't have any at all. What a scary world.

      I hadn't considered the ease with which digital books can be altered!!! But then my computer programme can be altered by the manufacturers, whenever.

    • mckbirdbks profile image

      mckbirdbks 

      9 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

      Hello John, here in the states, there seems to be a big push to dilute the public education system. There is a slogan, 'no child left behind', therefore all of them have to wait for the slowest. As computers do more of the mundane work and the labor of the Asian masses dilluting labor all across the globe the 'powers that be' figure they don't need an educated population.

      There are Thrift stores here that do not want donations of used books. Old toasters yes, books no.

      What bothers me about the wave of digital books is how easy the information can be controlled and manipulated.

    • John MacNab profile imageAUTHOR

      John MacNab 

      9 years ago from the banks of the St. Lawrence

      Hi Mike; I hadn't thought as far as public education disappearing, but it is a thought that would frighten any teacher, and it should scare Governments to death.

      My brush with culture came in the form of voracious reading; Dickens was my favourite author when I was 13. I was the normal 'read whatever book you can reach,' kid. In fact my first book was Decisive Battles of the World. I remember not understanding why my buddies didn't know who the Phoenicians were.

    • mckbirdbks profile image

      mckbirdbks 

      9 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

      Don't get me wrong I get that being young allows for certain adventures. But at some point if you are pursuing an education, then some culture should rub off on you. As for the alphabet and how it works, I think those threads may be gone. As books disappear and they will disappear. In print publishers are beginning to feel the pain right now.

      You mention the generation that may have lost the meaning of the importance of the alphabet. The current generation of youth may be the last to be taught this. There is a general attack on the notion that the youth should be taught at public expense. If public education crumbles in a generation there will be a ruling class and serfs.

    • John MacNab profile imageAUTHOR

      John MacNab 

      9 years ago from the banks of the St. Lawrence

      My two older sisters tried to get me interested in plays and the theatre, but I wasn't for doing what THEY said. I was into the motorbikes. Eventually, after my older sister married a music professor I did go to some shows because I liked my brother-in-law. I remember one particular orchestral night in Dublin where we HAD to go because it was the blind conductor's last night before retiring. It was a great night, but I still preferred the Bonneville.

      I was thinking again last night about reading and writing and how today's generation gets all its info from the computer. I was looking up the dictionary and I had this horrible thought about the alphabet - do teenagers understand how to look up a word? Do they understand that the alphabet works its way all the way through a word? That 'diatribe' comes after 'diabetes'? I know! I know! I need to switch my brain off, sorry Mike.

    • mckbirdbks profile image

      mckbirdbks 

      9 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

      There is a slogan I heard once while awake in English class that good readers make good writers. I think that applies. My youngest amazes me when she talks about the people she knows that do not read. No interest. A young man joined us for dinner a couple of Sunday's ago. He could talk sports and motorcycles. The girls were talking about theater and plays, he was bored.

      And 8 pages is not a good magazine article.

    • John MacNab profile imageAUTHOR

      John MacNab 

      9 years ago from the banks of the St. Lawrence

      That took me aback, Mike! How on earth can you get 8 page books? Isn't there a limit to the number of pages a book should have? But then I suppose it depends on my definition of a 'book.' To a 2 year old, three fold-over pages is a book.

      It's odd, but since I wrote that last comment, I've been thinking a lot about writing and reading. Are writers writers because they are readers or is it vice versa? In regard to losing yourself in a book, I am exactly the same. I also got a bookshop gift-card for my Christmas, and although I think I'll be using the Kindle mostly, there is absolutely nothing like the luxury of losing yourself in a good book.

    • mckbirdbks profile image

      mckbirdbks 

      9 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

      Hello John, your laugh for the day. To gather facts for my Cafe stories I sent away for 'The New Funk and Wagnalls Encyclopedia Yearbook Events of 1956' rather than searching online for little details I can just flip through the book. I know I am the exception, with books all over the place but I still would rather grab a book and get lost in it. I concede that Kindles and ereaders have their place and taken a strong foothold in the market. But I see the quality of work declining as would be writer's can earn more by buying a lawn mower and mowing lawns versus spending hours and hours trying to create something then being able to offer it for a dollar for potential e-readers to download. I am even hearing of 8 page books - yeah, that's a book alright.

    • John MacNab profile imageAUTHOR

      John MacNab 

      9 years ago from the banks of the St. Lawrence

      Hi Mike

      I'm getting kinda scared about this digital age, and I'm glad I won't be around to try to fix it. Wikipedia closes for a day and university students panic because they don't have anywhere to get their (facts?). Mind you, I can't talk - I've got a bookcase full of reference books, but rather than get up of my butt to look things up, I press a couple of buttons and read it off screen.

      You have the right idea Mike - if you can't beat them, join them.

    • mckbirdbks profile image

      mckbirdbks 

      9 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

      John, I feel the exact same way, 'What's a book?" I think that is already part of the culture. But once that part is missing, everything else falls apart, and all new thoughts will be filtered through digital surveillance. Right now, this day, the U.S. Congress is trying to pass a bill to censor the Internet. The digital world will be strictly controlled. People say I am paranoid.

      Ok I'm off to buy an iPad keyboard, for my youngest birthday present.

    • John MacNab profile imageAUTHOR

      John MacNab 

      9 years ago from the banks of the St. Lawrence

      Hi Mike

      Talking about fighting the Kindle wave, Mike. There was a news story last week about Kodak closing down. One teenager was interviewd and she - seriously - asked "What's Film?"

      One day someone is going to ask 'What's a book?"

      Excuse me while I call on my Kindle boy.

    • mckbirdbks profile image

      mckbirdbks 

      9 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

      There it is right there. Another thing I didn't think of to fight the Kindle wave. A Kindle boy, you never thought to get a book boy. "Book" pickup read - the only instructions you are ever going to need.

    • John MacNab profile imageAUTHOR

      John MacNab 

      9 years ago from the banks of the St. Lawrence

      I appreciate your concern over the overflow of cash from Hubpages, Mike. My problem at the moment is what offshore bank to deposit this months heady $0.43 in. I'm glad your youngest like her Kindle. I'm still getting to grips with my instructions. But I'll get there ...or...perhaps, perhaps I can hire a Kindle boy to work it for me, much like a pool boy. That way I will have time to roll about in the Hub banknotes.

    • mckbirdbks profile image

      mckbirdbks 

      9 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

      Tom if the cash flow continues from Hubpages at this rate, I am going to have to open my own bank. And the Empire continues. Just thought I'd get the hysterical laughter rolling.

      My youngest has a Kindle, she likes it.

    • John MacNab profile imageAUTHOR

      John MacNab 

      9 years ago from the banks of the St. Lawrence

      Hi Mike.

      Thanks for reading and commenting. I know 4 comments is 4 more than I usually get on a Hub, Mike, but I'd hardly call it a 'hit'. But thank you for the plaudits - and help.

      Soon to be former bookseller??? Are you going to retire or simply make your fortune on Hubpages?

      Which ever it is, I wish you all the best, and if you need a spare million or two, just give me a call and we can laugh hysterically together.

      Sincerely, Tom

    • John MacNab profile imageAUTHOR

      John MacNab 

      9 years ago from the banks of the St. Lawrence

      Hi Jools99. Your 'chuffed as muck' had me LOL. I haven't heard that for yonks. I knew where you came from straight away. Thanks for reading and commenting Jools. I'm glad you liked the Hub. I used to do my reading your way, but over here in winter,(it was -26C last night) I tend to scurry usptairs before my wife, and snuggle in - with Kindle.

    • mckbirdbks profile image

      mckbirdbks 

      9 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

      Hey look you have a 'Hit' of a hub. The Kindle is going to 'kill' books and by default good authors are going to disappear, no one is going to spend a year writing a novel to sell it for $1.97 less the Amazon commissions.

      Hope all is well with you. My youngest has a Kindle, she loves it.

      Mike the soon to be former bookseller

    • Jools99 profile image

      Jools Hogg 

      9 years ago from North-East UK

      Good review. I also found a Kindle under the Christmas tree - chuffed as muck! My daughter bought me a lovely book-light as slim as a pen which fixes to my Kindle cover for night-time reading when Dear Husband has settled down for the night. All in all a wonderful gift. I am still getting to grips with the instructions!

    • John MacNab profile imageAUTHOR

      John MacNab 

      9 years ago from the banks of the St. Lawrence

      Hi LoriSoard. Thank you for popping in to read and comment. I'm glad the Hub was helpful and I appreciate the 'up' vote. As for the Kindle; I wonder what I ever did without it - a bit like Hubpages.

    • John MacNab profile imageAUTHOR

      John MacNab 

      9 years ago from the banks of the St. Lawrence

      Hi Enlydia Listener. Thanks for reading and commenting. I've seen the adverts on my Kindle about the lending library but haven't got around to checking it out yet. I'm looking forward to it.

    • LoriSoard profile image

      LoriSoard 

      9 years ago from Henryville, Indiana

      I've been trying to decide if I want a Kindle or not. Thanks for the fabulous list of pros and cons. This will help me decide. Voting up.

    • Enlydia Listener profile image

      Enlydia Listener 

      9 years ago from trailer in the country

      by the way, I think Amazon offers free library books to borrow on something called Kindle Lending Library...why not check it out? All the books in the library are reads that you can only find on Kindle.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://corp.maven.io/privacy-policy

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
    ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)