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Lingering Rose ©

Updated on June 12, 2014
Dried rose in vase
Dried rose in vase | Source

The rose can be a symbol for love, beauty, new birth and surely the rose brings ecstasy. But perhaps while the rose is fresh and new, as new as the relationship it is attempting to foster, an uncanny twist of life comes along. While the rose is still in its prime the young and budding relationship ends. And what becomes of the rose? It is now a comforter for a little while and then it too must end in death.

In the dimness of a room, or from a far away look, the rose remains a little longer and yet it slowly dies. The day comes when the dead, stark rose must be tended to. The denial cannot last. Even so the sentimentality and symbolism of the ecstasy cannot bear to be discarded and so it is put into the unused or only occasionally occupied room. For as long as it stands in place it tells that person they were cared for if even for a little while. The special single rose nudges and comforts and brings a sentimental smile.

Caring For a Rose So It Will Last Longer

There are some very basic and simple steps that will keep your roses lasting more than a day and generally they can last up to a week before you take them away to that “other room or distant place”.

Preparation:

Always use a clean vase free of bacteria because the bacteria is what causes the rose to wilt and rot. Rinse the vase with diluted bleach water and then rinse clean. Fill your vase with very warm water (about 100 degrees).

Add a flower preservative from your florist or you can make your own. There are several preservatives you can make on your own. 1 T. vinegar and a ½ tsp. of sugar works well or mix up 1/2 tsp. bleach, lemon juiceand sugar. Using a bit of mountain dew or 7-up and a bit of bleach also will work. Some have suggested crushed aspirin instead of sugar to give nutrient and vodka to kill bacteria.

Take your roses from whatever container they are in and immediately place them in warm water. Cut away about 1/4 inch of the stems at a 45 degree angle so they can absorb as much liquid as possible.

It is important to keep them in warm water the entire time. Quickly place them in the vase you have prepared with warm water and preservative.

Place your rose or roses in an area that is not in direct sunlight and is free of drafts such as an air conditioner. They can be put in refrigerator over night if you wish.

Everyday or so, repeat the process of putting them in warm water, cutting stem off about ¼ or more inches each time, and placing them in a new mixture of warm water and preservative.

Remember that roses "drink" water from the vase and so add warm water as you see the level of water going down in the vase. As long as the rose is drinking, it is in good shape. Cutting the bottom of the stem off as described above will let it "drink" again.



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Rose on tatted scarf
Rose on tatted scarf | Source

Lingering Rose ©

The redness


The sweetness


Fragrance of alive


Tenderness of soul


Opening for


A day or two.


Then sudden


sweet sorrow.


Still red


Still sweet


And for yet


A little while


Lending beauty


To soul with


broken heart.


The head begins


it’s downward tilt.


In the distance


Dark’ning of


The petals edge


Others


May not see.


Slowly drinking


Until water


Warm and sweet


It can take no more.


Now a darkened beauty


Head fixed with final tilt


It gently pleads


Not to cast away.


But what can be done


With sobering sorrow


A short life lived


Yet remembered in


Each tomorrow.


Watered with


Salty tears


Still warm but


Not as sweet


Darkened beauty


Carefully placed


In distant room.


And still


The passing by


With glance of


Honeybee


Remembering


The nectar sweet


Of the lingering rose


That was for me.







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