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The Kings of Oak Springs | Episode 47 | Kate King’s 18th Birthday Celebration

Updated on September 7, 2015

She celebrated her 18th birthday

Candles on the birthday cake
Candles on the birthday cake

Another 18th birthday to celebrate

Kate King’s 18th birthday fell on Friday, March 10th, in 1882. In cooperation with her parents, Kate, along with her family, was invited by the Campbell’s to a birthday party on Saturday afternoon at the Campbell’s home. Vic greeted Kate at the door and invited everyone in to the decorated living room. The two families had spent enough time together, already, that they felt like family, and made themselves right at home.

After they had gone through all the normal birthday traditions, Ralph Campbell said there was one more gift he wanted to present to Kate. “Not exactly a gift, I suppose, because you have earned it. The bank has decided to offer you a job at the bank, as a clerk, when you finish your schooling. From the end of school until the end of June, you will work with Vic, at the bank, three days a week, learning to do what he has been doing, and carry on that work.” Then, he continued. “With your parents’ permission, we have arranged for you to stay at the Boarding House on the two nights between your work. That way, you can come in to town to your job on Monday morning, and stay in town, on your own, for the three days, then return home on Wednesday after work. How does that sound?”

Kate: I hardly know what to say. It sounds like a wonderful opportunity. (Looking at her parents) Did you know about this?

Katherine: Yes, we’ve worked together to come up with what we felt would be a workable arrangement for everyone. We hope you agree.

Kate: Oh, yes. I assume then that you are alright with my staying in town for two nights a week.

Katherine: We feel like it will give you some good experience that you don’t get by staying on the farm all the time. You are old enough to handle it, we feel.

Kate: I really look forward to the opportunity. I’m pleased you have that confidence in me.

Katherine: That was never a question. As Mr. Campbell said, you have earned it.

Kate: Thank you, very much, everyone.

They approved the Mayor position

The Mayor used the gavel
The Mayor used the gavel

Karl talked with Joseph Cox at the Oak Creek Farm and Home

Karl: So, the Town Council approved the addition of the Mayor position to town government?

Joseph: Yes, after what felt like endless discussion of change versus maintaining our own town traditions, the council voted unanimously to add the Mayor position, to replace the Chairman of the Council position. By doing this, of course, both sides of the issue sort of won, or lost, depending on your point of view. It could be done without an election, and everyone agreed that was a good idea. We didn’t need to incur that expense. Now, we are in compliance with the state, and comparable to other communities on the issue. I feel confident the issue will now go away, as a source of conflict.

Karl: Glad to hear that. Although I don’t live in town, I’ve felt all members of the council have acted in good faith on each issue that I cared about.

Joseph: I’m pleased to hear that, thank you.

Karl: How is the rental housing market now that spring is just around the corner.

Joseph: Funny you should ask. Just yesterday, we purchased Block EE to begin adding more houses, when time and weather permit. We’ve had more than a couple of inquiries about buying a couple of the existing rentals, so we decided it was time to move ahead. This is the time of year to make that decision, so we did it.

Karl: You and Abner have made really great partners in this business, it appears to me. Keep up the good work.

Joseph: Well, as long the economy holds up, and folks keep paying their bills, we’ll be all right. We do depend on the good will of all those involved, of course. From finding workers to build, being able to get the materials on hand, finding good renters, and then a few buyers, from time to time. It is a wonderful cycle when everything works well. But, we could ‘go broke’ quick, if the cycle were to be broken. So, like farming, we are not without risk.

Karl: Good reminder for each of us, on both accounts. I’ve been very fortunate for things to have gone well purchasing the extra land for our farm. But, I do depend on my neighbors to participate, and for there to be a market for my excess crops. There continue to be a number of things that have to go right to continue to succeed. And, there are a number of things that could go wrong, mainly the weather, of course. This strange winter we have had does cause some concern. What will we get next is always the question?

The weather changed from time to time

Winter weather
Winter weather

April 1st fell on Saturday in 1882

Trey Parks and Alfred Weston were pleased to host the 3rd Anniversary of the opening of the Parks Wagon Works Sales and Implement Office on Saturday, April 1. There were specials available for in store purchases as well as for firm orders placed for larger items to be constructed. John Deere participated with the introduction of some new models for local farmers to consider for the upcoming season.

The Wednesday, April 5 edition of the Oak Springs Enterprise carried on the front page the story that Jesse James was killed by Bob Ford in St. Joseph on April 3.

Following the very cold early February, March was relatively normal and farmers were beginning to think about getting into their fields. However, April began with rain just about every day, and if it didn’t rain one day, it seemed to rain more and harder the following day. Rivers and creeks were running full, or overflowing, on a regular basis, with each new round of rainfall, throughout the valley.

Note from the author

This is the forty-seventh episode of this short story series, and the seventh of what will be Volume Three. The stories are set in the Ozarks Mountains setting of “The Homeplace Saga” series of family saga historical fiction. This Episode is set in March of the calendar year 1882. The 20-Episode Series OSx, “Life in Oak Springs and more” fills in the gap of time between Episodes 40 and 41 in this series. These episodes move the story forward for the entire "Saga" series.

The earlier episodes of the King Family series have now been compiled into two eBooks, titled: "The Kings of Oak Springs,” Vol. 1 and Vol. 2 (20 episodes each). See the link, below, to get yours.

“The Homeplace Saga” historical fiction family saga stories are the creation of the author, William Leverne Smith, also known as “Dr. Bill.”

Video Book Trailer

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    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 19 months ago from Central Florida

      I can't help but think about the drought that's plighting our farmers now as I read about the rains of 1882. The weather can make or break a farm's yield and profits.

      Kate must be excited about her new job and being able to live away from home for the first time. I'm sure she'll adapt well and take the bull by the horns.

    • WillStarr profile image

      WillStarr 19 months ago from Phoenix, Arizona

      This is a superb series, William. Well done once again.

    • Homeplace Series profile image
      Author

      William Leverne Smith 19 months ago from Hollister, MO

      Yes, Sha, a new stage of life is approaching for Kate.

      The relation between town life and farm life, even so close fascinates me... always has. My Mom was a town girl, married a farmer, in 1938. I have copies of all of her diaries through that period of her life...

      Love your comments, so much. THANK YOU!! ;-)

    • Homeplace Series profile image
      Author

      William Leverne Smith 19 months ago from Hollister, MO

      Thank you, so much, Will. These great comments keep me going. ;-)

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      With the advantage of history on our side, it's easy to see this as an exciting time to be alive in this country...but....I'm sure the people living there were just busy living life and rarely felt that "excitement." The mundane was the norm then as now.

    • Homeplace Series profile image
      Author

      William Leverne Smith 19 months ago from Hollister, MO

      For sure, Bill. Great observation. I certainly see life in Oak Springs, in 1882, as mundane, but that is how I view most of life. And, I like it that way, quite frankly. There are 'moments' for each of us, and them, of course, but generally, life just moves along. I hope that is what I am reflecting here... I don't expect to earn 'story of the year' honors... I just enjoy the recognition from a few, that we are seeing life, as it may have been led then. Thanks for your cogent thoughts, as always! ;-)

    • Larry Rankin profile image

      Larry Rankin 19 months ago from Oklahoma

      Another engaging installment.

    • Homeplace Series profile image
      Author

      William Leverne Smith 19 months ago from Hollister, MO

      Thank you, Larry... I appreciate each of your visits, and comments! ;-)

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