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The Writer's Mailbag: Installment Eleven

Updated on September 8, 2014

And Welcome Back Once Again

And they said it wouldn’t last!

Actually, nobody said that about this series. I have been very happy with the response and encouragement, and the questions are pouring in, so we shall continue.

You ask and I answer. That’s how this works, and it doesn’t work if you don’t ask, so get to asking, please. Ask in the comment section below, or email me at holland1145@yahoo.com, or on my website at www.williamdhollandauthor.com. That’s all there is to it.

And now, installment eleven begins.

Don't say the cow went "Moooo." Find a way to describe the sound that is creative.
Don't say the cow went "Moooo." Find a way to describe the sound that is creative. | Source

Buzz, Screech, and Other Nonsense Words

From Lyns: Question Billy, you stated shouldn't use words like buzz etc., is it okay to use words leading into the story like, quietly she stands to her feet and a gusty winds brushed across her tiny forehead?

Great question and Lyns answered it herself. Talk about a win/win situation for me.

Listen, here’s the thing about words that are meant to portray sounds: I think, and this is just my opinion, that it is a lazy tool. Great writers find a way to illustrate the sound without relying on words like “buzz,” and Lyns just gave a perfect example of it.

If I’m writing a story, and I have a woman scream in one chapter, you tell me which is more effective. I could say that she saw a shadow move and screamed “AHHHH,” or I could write her pulse increased, tiny fingers of fear tickled the back of her neck, and a sound erupted from the depths of her primal being. Which do you think is more effective?

Poetry and Ownership on Hp

Whonu asks: “Bill, if you write a series of poetry on hub pages, may you use your own work later in a book of poetry? Who owns your work?”

This is one of those questions that I see weekly. You own your work. HP is simply an online platform where you can publish your work. Many writers have published their poems in books of poetry, and many more will in the future. It is the same for short stories, or chapters of an ongoing book, or even random articles. If you want to combine them all and make them into a book later, you certainly have the right to do so, and I would highly recommend that you do just that.

"Pretty as a picture" may be accurate, but it is also overused.
"Pretty as a picture" may be accurate, but it is also overused. | Source

What’s Wrong with Cliches?

From Deb: “I know you advise not to use clichés, but isn’t it true that clichés are quite common in our language, and as such should be used by a writer?”

Great question, Deb, and it requires a little clarification on my point about not using clichés.

My main problem with clichés is when a writer relies too heavily on them. Of course we all use them. I don’t know of a writer who doesn’t….but….simply because the first ten-thousand lemmings ran off the cliff, does that make it right if you are #10,001?

I think clichés can become a crutch if used too often. That’s my main point. I’ll even add a second point to the first: how cool would it be if you, the writer, coined a phrase that became a cliché?

It takes work and creativity to find a new way of saying something. It requires little creativity to use that which has been overused.

Writing is my business...my studio is my office...interruptions are not allowed
Writing is my business...my studio is my office...interruptions are not allowed | Source

Shutting out the World

From Rhonda: “How do you shut the world out long enough to finish the longer stuff? Poems, shorts, how to and such, sure I can whip it out but I can't seem to finish the really long stuff, what's important. I can't lock myself in a cave, though I've thought of it! What do you do?”

Rhonda, it’s not really fair for me to answer this question, because I have a unique situation. I don’t have kids, nor do I have another job. I have a separate writing studio away from the house traffic, and the only real distractions I have are ones that I allow.

Early on when I started freelance writing, I notified friends and family that writing was now my full-time job, and as such I would not tolerate interruptions. I was not available for social calls, or for running errands for family members. I treated writing just like any other job. I have office hours and nobody is allowed to mess with those office hours.

All well and good, but if you don’t have a similar situation, then it is very hard to shut out the world while you work on long-range projects.

Sorry, but that’s the best I can do for you. I would suggest setting aside even an hour each day that is purely for writing. Do not allow anything to interrupt during that hour, and stick to your guns on that (and yes, that was a cliché).

Schedule the Day

Maria asks: could you give us a hint into how you schedule your week? You write for HubPages, and you write novels, and you have customers. How do you balance it all and find time for it all?

Well, Maria, thanks for the question, and it’s a question I hear often.

The first thing to understand is that this is a full-time job for me. Nothing interferes with it.

Having said that, I write my articles for HubPages on Mondays; Tuesdays are for customers. Wednesdays and Thursdays are for novel-writing, and Fridays are for loose ends I didn’t get to during the week. While I’m working on those daily goals, I am constantly checking my email so I can comment on the articles that other writers write, and also I stop by Facebook so I can keep in touch on the social media.

It may seem a bit hectic to others, but this works for me, and that’s the point I would like to make to all of you. You need to find a schedule that works for you. Tinker with it until you are comfortable with it, and then stay determined enough to stick with it until your work is done. You are the boss of your business, and you are the workforce. Nobody but you is going to know if you cheat on your work hours, so be a tough boss and demand a great work ethic.

Baseball didn't work out so I became a writer
Baseball didn't work out so I became a writer | Source

And Finally, from Trisha

“Hey, Bill! What did you want to be when you were growing up?”

I know, this has nothing to do with writing, but I thought it was a cute question, so let’s take care of it now and then wrap this baby up.

I wanted to be a professional baseball player until I threw out my arm in college. Then I wanted to be a writer, followed by a teacher. I ended up working in Business with degrees in Marketing and Economics, but the dreams never died. I went back to college six years after graduation and got my teaching degree, and taught for nineteen years.

And now I’m a writer.

Is this a great life or what?

More Next Week

Thanks for stopping by, and thanks to those of you who asked questions. I’ll be back with Installment Twelve next Monday. Until then, remember to never allow anyone to clip your creative wings. If you are a writer, and you are if you say you are, then spread those wings and fly.

2014 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

“Helping writers to spread their wings and fly.”

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    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I think so too, Deb. Thank you!

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      Deb Hirt 2 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Looks like the mailbag has plenty going for it. What a nice way to keep an ongoing column.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you caseymel...I appreciate you becoming a regular.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Bill, thanks for returning. Honestly, I don't think so. The odds are so great against someone making it....but I gave it my best shot, buddy, and that's all we can do. Thanks for being here.

    • caseymel profile image

      caseymel 2 years ago from Indiana

      Great advice! I can't wait to see your next installment!

    • bdegiulio profile image

      Bill De Giulio 2 years ago from Massachusetts

      Hi Bill. I missed this one so I came back to read because I love this series. I love that photo of you in your baseball uniform. Had you not injured your arm do you think you had a realistic shot at playing baseball for a living? I'm willing to bet you threw some pretty mean heat.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      mdscoggins, you make a valid point...cliches are tied to western culture, and as such they are unavoidable at times. Valid point for sure and I think you for it.

    • mdscoggins profile image

      Michelle Scoggins 2 years ago from Fresno, CA

      Another great installment!! I too have struggled with describing sounds but I certainly see the importance of doing so. Also, I found some cliche's in my writing and frequently hesitated their use. I recognize for myself why that is and will avoid using them as best as I can. Many of the cliches used are tied to Western culture and I hope my writing appeals to anyone that can read and comprehend the English language without concern if they have learned specific phrases.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you vkwok. You are appreciated.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Eric, I'm always grateful when you show up, on time or a few days late. Thanks my friend.

    • vkwok profile image

      Victor W. Kwok 2 years ago from Hawaii

      This is some really great information you have here, Bill! Thumbs up!

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 2 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      My little system told me that I forgot to comment on this great hub series. I should review the part on distractions again ;-)

      Great stuff and as usual applicable immediately.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you very much Alicia!

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      This is another enjoyable and informative article in your series, Bill. Keep them coming!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Oh, Heidi, thank you, but I think I really fall short of "hero" status. LOL

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      Heidi Thorne 2 years ago from Chicago Area

      I think "protecting" writing time (or work time in general) when working at home is a monumental task! Admire your ability to keep that time sacred and set boundaries. You're my hero! :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Paula, I'll gladly allow you to read them all. :) Thank you for your support.

    • Paula Atwell profile image

      Paula Atwell 2 years ago from Cleveland, OH

      I am going to come back and read this whole series from the beginning probably after the holidays. So informative and I am interested in writing one or more books. Need the impetus.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Genna, that is very kind of you. Thank you so much my friend. I am humbled.

    • Genna East profile image

      Genna East 2 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

      “Remember to never allow anyone to clip your creative wings.” Amen. This is such an enjoyable series, Bill.

      And congratulations on winning the Hubbie Award. I would say this is richly deserved, except that it would probably be the understatement the year. High-fives, my friend. They got it right. :-)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Dicey for sure, Michelle....thanks for the visit.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you lifegate. I am greatly enjoying this series.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Lori, thank you for your thoughts about cliches, and for your kind words. I have some pretty good friends, and you can always count on friends. As for the book not being on Amazon....I have no clue, but I'll check. Thanks for the heads up, and thank you so much for purchasing it.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jo, tell that muse that you need her now! Times a'wastin' and there are words to be written. :) Thank you dear friend. Have a wonderful week.

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Iris, at one time I had a Pinto, and it was always dependable, and the writing world needs that....writers who you can depend on to give quality work every time out. Thank you my friend.

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      Michelle Liew 2 years ago from Singapore

      That point about ownership of work is always a dicey one. But we write it...we own it!

    • lifegate profile image

      William Kovacic 2 years ago from Pleasant Gap, PA

      Hi Bill,

      Thanks once again for so much useful information. These are things we can actually use and apply to everyday life. This has been a very educational series as well as just plain fun to read! Up and sharing!

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      Lori Colbo 2 years ago from Pacific Northwest

      I love this series, Bill. So practical. In my creative writing classes I always got dinged for cliches. They are lazy if you overuse them and they can be so trite. The whole idea of writing is creating. Perhaps we could look at it as creating our own cliches with our exceptional, creative imagination.

      I also agree on "sound" words. I think of children's books when I hear words that describe a sound, like "buzzing," "kerplunk," "pop, pop, pop." And again, it's a crutch as you said. Sometimes they work, but not as a rule. I love the word drone, as in "the drone of an airplane." However, a more creative way would be to describe it another way. I still like it though.

      Oh billybuc-a-roony, I am so proud of you for winning the Hubbie award. I voted for you as well. You rock dude. Blessings my friend.

      P.S. I ordered your new book. It should arrive tomorrow. Can't wait. I will review it on Amazon. Speaking of which, the book was not on your regular Amazon page. Any reason?

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      Jo Alexis-Hagues 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

      Bill, I can see that you're having fun with this, the writer's mailbag is a terrific idea and I'm loving it, so keep them coming. I'm sure I'll be asking a few questions when my muse decides to pay me a visit. Take care and my best to you.

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      Cristen Iris 2 years ago from Boise, Idaho

      I love this series. I too have wondered how you balance it all. I work a full time office job so I write from 5 a.m. until 6:30 a.m. I have to keep in mind that you're a race car and I'm a Pinto right now. And that's OK. I'm looking forward to the day when I work this thing full time.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Maria, I'm just doing what I was raised to do. My parents are as much the reason for how I turned out as anyone or anything. Much of who I am is because of them and their love and support.

      And I greatly appreciate you.

      love,

      bill

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Faith, congratulations on your well-deserved Hubbie. It's nice to know my vote counts for something. :)

      hugs my friend, and thank you.

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      Maria Jordan 2 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

      Dear Bill,

      Great installment as always...

      like Faith, I wanted to CONGRATULATE you on the 2014 Hubbie for Best All Around Hubber and the Most Supportive Hubber.

      You give heart and soul every day -- you are appreciated. Love, Maria

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      Faith Reaper 2 years ago from southern USA

      Hello Best All Around Hubber friend, Bill! You are certainly an all-around, stand up kind of guy.

      This wonderful series you have going is also one of the many reasons you were voted as Most Supportive Hubber.

      Hugs and much love to you always

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Nell, I love that....so many people are cliches. That is great. LOL Thanks for the laugh my friend, and good luck with that schedule.

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      Nell Rose 2 years ago from England

      Hi Bill, great answers and something for me to think about, I need to set myself to a schedule, I am useless to be honest, everything else seems to get in the way, I did smile at the cliche's, purely because I used to be so bad with them, and I always say that in life so many people are cliches so why can't we use them? lol! great read as always, nell

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Brian, I don't know how your mind works of course, but I know for me, I need to compartmentalize or nothing is accomplished. It is very hard for me to do different types of writing all in the same day, but fairly easy if I do the same type each day. Who knows? Maybe it will work for you. Thanks for your thoughts.

    • B. Leekley profile image

      Brian Leekley 2 years ago from Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA

      From the late 80s to the late 90s I cared around the clock for my mother, hemiplegic and aphasic from a stroke, and I wrote the first few drafts of a novel. I aimed for 2 hours per day and used a stopwatch. If my mother fell asleep in her wheelchair while watching TV, or was entertaining herself playing with stuffed animals, or was otherwise occupied, I got some writing done -- maybe for two minutes, maybe for twenty minutes, or whatever, until she yelled for assistance.

      I'm intrigued by your schedule and may try something like it. I had assumed that you divided the hours of each day into hub writing time, hubtivity time, writing for hire time, novel writing time, etc. Maybe I would be more productive if I, too, wrote fiction on certain days, hubs on certain days, etc.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jama, thanks for clearing up that little mystery about where you went to, and bless you for doing the good deeds you have been doing. There ain't many like you my friend. I want to believe there are, but I'm enough of a realist to guess there probably aren't.

      As for your writing schedule, I love it...treat it like the job it is. I don't know any other way to make it in this business.

    • JamaGenee profile image

      Joanna McKenna 2 years ago from Central Oklahoma

      Bill, great answer about setting a schedule. I used to have one where I wrote blog posts on certain days and made the rounds of HP on other days. That schedule went by the wayside when I was "adopted" by an out-of-state then-88-yr-old, legally blind friend whose thirst for learning hasn't stopped despite her advanced age. The internet and her electronic reader don't play well together - "Peter" can't be programmed NOT to read URLs as if they're text - so I became her online researcher and book buyer. I couldn't in all good conscience put off her requests to suit MY schedule. When I person is 88, who knows if they'll croak in their sleep? If she called or emailed asking "What do you know about such-and-such?" - usually nothing or not much at that moment - I'd drop everything, find everything available on the subject and email the results. (This was the Real Life issue I mentioned earlier.)

      So yes, I allowed my friend to ultimately destroy my writing schedule. Recently, however, she discovered online college courses and a relative in her town set up the links so she could access them without "Peter" having to read the URLs aloud. Meaning my time is now my own again.

      Most days I get on the computer sometime in the morning and get off around 5 o'clock, the same hours I'd keep at a job outside my home. I don't have the luxury of a separate writing studio, only an alcove off the living room, but "mentally" the alcove is where I work and the living room is not. The laptop stays in the "work area". If an idea strikes after 5:00, I keep a pad and pen on the coffee table to write it down and don't take the pad back to the alcove until the next morning. I should mention I live alone, so no "family traffic" to contend with, which is one of the perks of being an empty nester.

      Keep the questions and answers coming! ;D

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Awww, thanks, DJ! It means something to me because other writers voted, so thank you again for your support and friendship.

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      DJ Anderson 2 years ago

      CONGRATULATIONS, BILL HOLLAND.

      BEST ALL-AROUND HUBBER AND

      MOST SUPPORTIVE HUBBER!!!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Dianna. I'm very satisfied with how it turned out, despite the detours along the way.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sheila, that's exactly what i'm talking about. One sentence explains one word, and gives much more depth to the writing. Thank you, and I hope the headache goes away soon. :)

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      No my friend, it never stops...and I love that fact. :)

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      Dianna Mendez 2 years ago

      Many thanks for the advice, Bill. Glad you followed your dream of teaching, and now writing. It think it all worked together for the good.

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      sheilamyers 2 years ago

      Instead of saying "whew" I'll say I whistle as I let a big sign of relief. How's that? I'm glad you more fully explained about the use of cliches. There are times I give myself a headache trying to think of something to replace a worn out cliché. I do try to stay away from them as much as possible.

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      manatita44 2 years ago from london

      So right, not success but progress .. the voyage of Self-transcendence. The journey never stops ... Peace Bro.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you very much, Doris. I love this community of writers. I wouldn't be here today if it weren't for the support and friendship of people like you. If I can ever be of any help to you, feel free to reach out.

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      Doris H. Dancy 2 years ago from Yorktown, Virginia

      Hi billybuc ~ I love your writing and the ideas of creativity. Since coming to Hub Pages, my most difficult part has been deciding what to write, but you seem to have no problem at all with that big issue. (smiles) Your answers here are very helpful.

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you so much, Dora. I try my friend. That's all I can do.

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks, Brie. I couldn't do what I do if it weren't for that schedule.

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Manatita, I really am a fortunate human being. Three dreams and I've had them all...now on to the fourth one, for our dreams must never end. Blessings and thanks my friend.

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      Dora Isaac Weithers 2 years ago from The Caribbean

      Thanks for sharing, Bill. So glad you found your dream of being a writer. You're good at it and you're a great help to other writers.

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      Brie Hoffman 2 years ago from Manhattan

      Having an ironclad schedule always helps me when it comes to writing. Good read once again.

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      manatita44 2 years ago from london

      What I like best Bill is that although I read the whole thing, I was quite pleased that you accomplished all three ambitions: marketing and business; teaching and finally writing. So fortunate you are!

      Great article, and yes, the light touch at the end is cute, too. Peace.

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Rhonda. I'm sorry I couldn't be more help. I schedule one sort of writing for one day because of what you mentioned...bouncing around. I can't do two different projects the same day. I need to wrap my brain around one type of writing per day, and then shifting gears the next day is easier.

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Deb. I have my parents to thank for whatever self-discipline I have. I admit to being driven, but I've also learned to step on the brakes and enjoy life.

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      That's my hope, Bill. We can all learn from each other. Thanks my friend and Happy Monday to you.

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Special delivery, Frank, to special friends. Thank you.

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you PS. I love this series. I love the interaction with my fellow writers. This is just oodles of fun.

      angels, spread your wings, and deliver hugs to Florida

      bill

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      Rhonda Lytle 2 years ago from Deep in the heart of Dixie

      Bill, thank you for answering my question. I'm not in the same situation, but then. perhaps those subtle differences in everyone's life are the spice of it.

      The scheduling you spoke of later in relation to multiple projects makes a lot of sense. Personally, I find it hard to bounce around but am seeing more and more it's just required. God bless and thank you for sharing with us.

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      Deborah Neyens 2 years ago from Iowa

      Thanks for sharing your writing schedule. Your self-discipline is amazing and something to aspire to.

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      William Leverne Smith 2 years ago from Hollister, MO

      Great questions and answers! Love that opening image - the old farm boy in me, I'm sure!! Sharing your work schedule and how you maintain it serves as an excellent example for others. Thanks, again! ;-)

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      Frank Atanacio 2 years ago from Shelton

      Once again, your mail bag delivers.. great share

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      Patricia Scott 2 years ago from sunny Florida

      O Bill now you know I must go back and read the earlier entries....this is so spot on...is that a cliché :D :D ????

      You do have a knack or should I say THE knack.

      Love and hugs and many Angels to you, Deb, and the Chicks ps

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I love it, Rachael, and that's how it is done. You just wrote this article for me...a little late. LOL Thank you.

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, my week will be as good as I allow it to be...and right now I plan on allowing it free rein. :) Thank you my friend, and Happy Monday to you.

      bill

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      Rachael O'Halloran 2 years ago from United States

      Scheduling writing time? Oh, how I love my "Do Not Disturb" sign! Answering machine goes on, sign goes on the door, TV close captioning is on in case of "breaking news" (I do this because I was 12 hours behind the news of Sept 11th attacks!!!) and I stay off my majong game sites until at least 2 hours has passed or 10 pages of writing, whichever comes first. Treat myself to 20 minutes of majong and then back to writing. lol

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      Ann Carr 2 years ago from SW England

      A schedule is a must when it's your job but trying to convince people it's a serious pastime is difficult, I find. I'm just playing on my laptop apparently!

      It's fun playing with clichés though; all part of wordsmithing.

      Hope you have a great week, bill.

      Ann

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Ruby. I enjoy this series; much more than I thought I would.

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Randi, thanks for stopping by, and stay dry. :) I'm sure there are a lot of confused folks there.

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      Ruby Jean Fuller 2 years ago from Southern Illinois

      Great questions and great answers. Keep it up. I always learn something each time you write...

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      Randi Benlulu 2 years ago from Mesa, AZ

      I second Jodah's comment, although.....I know myself well enough to know that I am not disciplined enough to stick to the necessary structure. I'd settle for a couple of days to write!

      Thanl you for your, always great advice! Have a great day! It's pouring here in Mesa and the poor folks here don't know what to do!

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks John and believe me, I know how lucky I am. :)

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Very true DDE. Thank you for sharing that.

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      YES, Lizzy! Your own cliché...the Lizzy Cliché, soon to be used by millions of writers around the world. :)

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sally, I guarantee you, growing up, being an urban farmer was far down the goals list. LOL Now it's near the top. Go figure!

      Thank you my friend. I'm looking forward to your 50th article.

      bill

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Janine, I would go crazy with two little ones...no joke at all. You are doing find, and I'm sure you'll figure it all out. Happy Monday to you as well my friend.

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      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I really am, Ally, and you bet I know that. :) Some day you'll be there, so keep working at it in preparation for that day. Thanks for the visit this morning.

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      John Hansen 2 years ago from Queensland Australia

      Oh to have my own writing studio and be able to call writing my full time job...something to strive for Bill. Another good article in this series. Keep them coming, I'm sure the questions will.

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      Devika Primić 2 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      An encouraging hub indeed. Writing can be fun and also a idea to earn from only if one can have patience for such a life.

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      Liz Davis 2 years ago from Hudson, FL

      "Like a moth to a flame". That's a cliché that needs to burn up and disappear like a winged insect in a hot glowing body of ignited gas.

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      Sally Gulbrandsen 2 years ago from Norfolk

      Hello Billy,

      Very enjoyable read. I especially enjoyed the last question - does one every grow up and does one ever stop wanting to achieve new things? Perhaps you can add urban farmer to your the list of goals?

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      Janine Huldie 2 years ago from New York, New York

      Always love you take and must admit I am trying to get a better schedule now especially for the kids now being back in school. It used to be afternoons I had free time, but now Lily has morning pre-school and still trying to juggle my current schedule and turning the world out is totally a challenge, but sneak moments whenever I can I suppose. Happy Monday Bill and thank you always for just being you!

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      Ally Lewis 2 years ago from Pittsburgh, PA

      I wish I could make my life about writing. With gas to buy, bills to pay, school loans to get rid of...who can afford to do nothing but write? You're one of the lucky ones.

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      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Sha. It works for me. No guarantee it will for you, but who knows, right?

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      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Marlene. I sure like it that you are back with us. Selfish I know, but truthful.

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      Shauna L Bowling 2 years ago from Central Florida

      I like the way you break your week out assigning tasks to a given day. I'll have to give that a shot. I need to spend at least one day a week marketing, then maybe I'll have the luxury of having a day set aside for client work. Great tip, Bill!

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      Marlene Bertrand 2 years ago from Northern California, USA

      Fabulous answers, Bill. I also like the videos, especially the one about scheduling time. For most of my adult life I have worked from home, so I can vouch for your excellent answer to the question about finding a schedule that works for them.