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The Writer's Mailbag: Installment Fifty

Updated on June 8, 2015

Fifty and Counting

Not bad for a one-time only article. Fifty installments later we’re still going strong. Who woulda thunk it? Certainly not me.

Here we go again. You ask, I answer, and we all come out of it a little bit more informed. At least that’s the hope.

So let’s get started with a follow-up question from Carol about correct grammar and punctuation.

Welcome to the Mailbag
Welcome to the Mailbag | Source

NON-FICTION

From Carol: "Is it wrong to stretch correct punctuation with non-fiction???

For those who missed last week, this is in response to a question we had about stretching the grammatical limits in fiction writing. Carol wants to know if we can do the same thing in non-fiction.

Is it wrong to do so? I’m not sure the word “wrong” works here. I’m of the belief that there is no right or wrong when writing, but that’s a bit esoteric in the extreme. Non-fiction is a bit of a sticky wicket with regards to proper grammar. Usually non-fiction is, almost by its very nature, grammatically correct. I do think, though, that there are times when the author of a non-fiction can use incorrect grammar, or incorrect punctuation, to make a point, and I have read some non-fiction writers whose natural voice includes some grammatical liberties and it flows smoothly.

I’m going to go back to my original statement: there is no right or wrong in writing, and there are no rules that are buried in cement that can’t be broken. Just take care with non-fiction that you don’t muck it all up by being creative with your grammar.

Learn as much as you can about your character before you begin your novel
Learn as much as you can about your character before you begin your novel | Source

Character Portraits

From Zulma: Hey, Bill. You've talked about how you create your characters here and it's good to know. When you do their 'bios' do you include the environment they grew up in and interactions they had with neighbours, friends, etc? What about a psychological profiles? Any traumatic or particularly happy events?

Zulma, thanks for the question. This idea of doing a bio for characters struck a chord with a number of readers last week, so it’s good to have a follow-up.

When I do the bios I try to make them as detailed as possible. The things you mentioned in your question would certainly be included. As a writer of fiction, I want my characters to be as life-like as possible, so of course they have to have a past that has affected them in some way. Even if I don’t use that information in the novel, it serves as background information for me.

My main characters tend to be complex, so I usually delve deeply into their psyches. I’m working on a vigilante right now, and I want my readers to know why he is the way he is. He was not born to kill. Certain things happened to him while growing up that put him on the path he is on, and I think it’s important to understand that. The same with my main antagonists. I want them to be seen as complex human beings and not just stone-cold killers with a thirst for blood-kill.

Helpful? I hope so!

It’s a Mystery

From Miriam: “I’m working on a novel right now, and I don’t know whether it falls under suspense, thriller or mystery. I know it’s important to name a genre, so how do I decide which one?”

The first thing that came to mind, Miriam, is if you don’t know how can you expect me to know….but I’m being silly when I say that, so please don’t take offense.

This is actually a common problem with writers, and it is an important decision to make. Agents and publishers needs to know which genre your book falls into. Even if you self-publish, you need to name a genre, so yes, you have to make up your mind.

The two you named are, at the very least, murky in definition. Mystery usually relates to a crime being committed and the solving of that crime. It’s when you talk about suspense/thrillers that we really have a problem, so much so that you will often see them lumped together as one. Instead of giving you a definition of a suspense/thriller, let me just say a name….Alfred Hitchcock!

It is entirely possible that your book involves all three in which case drop back ten yards, punt the ball and hope for a great roll. J

What time period are you writing in? The vernacular must match the period.
What time period are you writing in? The vernacular must match the period. | Source

Current Vernacular

From Nadine: I was reading a book the other day, and the story was set in today’s world. The main character spoke like he was from the Sixties, even though he was only thirty years old. I found it distracting and not realistic at all. Can you comment on using the correct dialogue for the correct time period?

Well yes I can, Nadine, and I’m guilty as charged. LOL

A couple months ago I had a beta reader politely chew my butt out for exactly this thing. My main character was using words that were popular four or five decades ago, even though the book is set in today’s time. I didn’t even notice it. I was too close to it, and actually my main character was speaking like I speak. I thought everything was okay. My beta reader told me that everything was not okay.

Lesson learned!

On the other hand, in my very first novel, The 12/59 Shuttle from Yesterday to Today, I have one character who is a hippy at heart even though he’s only mid-thirties, and he speaks like he time-travelled from 1968, and it seems perfectly appropriate because of who he is.

So consider all that, consider your characters, and be careful as you proceed with dialogue. If you want your book to seem realistic, then the language must be consistent with the characters and the time.

PUBLISHING

From Bob: “I’ve never published a book before but I’m almost done with my first and I don’t know which route to take. Do I make it an ebook or do I try to find a publisher. Any words of advice?”

No!

How’s that for an honest answer?

Seriously, no!

If you want the safe route then make an ebook. If you want to pull your hair out daily in frustration then try to find an established agent and/or publisher. But what do you want from your book is probably a better question? Do you just want a book published with no expectations about selling great numbers? Then by all means make an ebook and print on demand through CreateSpace.

Do you want huge sales? Then learn how to be a topnotch marketing expert, because you’ll need to be that no matter how you publish that book.

I’m not trying to be pessimistic, Bob; just realistic.

More Next Week

We’re getting close to the one-year mark for this series, and I find that remarkable, and I have all of you to thank for it….so thank you! I love this series and I’m glad you’ve found it valuable and entertaining for fifty weeks.

Let’s do it again next week, okay?

2015 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

“Helping writers to spread their wings and fly.”

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    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Glimmer, I'm laughing. I grew up in the 60s and never liked that word. It always seemed silly to me, but today it brought a smile to my face. Thank you and enjoy the remaining weeks of your summer.

    • Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

      Glimmer Twin Fan 2 years ago

      I find myself using more and more punctuation online. Maybe it's because of all of the emojis, but I think in the right setting, it can really drive a point home. Hope you had a really groovy summer (I used that word the other day and my daughter and her friend started giggling!).

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Lawrence! I appreciate your loyal following.

    • lawrence01 profile image

      Lawrence Hebb 2 years ago from Hamilton, New Zealand

      Bill

      Really enjoyed this as it gave me a lot of food for thought.

      Lawrence

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I appreciate that, Deb! Thank you so much!

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 2 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      The mailbag is always so easy to read and filled with great tips. Thanks again for all you do!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Marlene, if I had a thousand followers like you, I'd be on the New York Times Bestseller's List. Thank you!

    • MarleneB profile image

      Marlene Bertrand 2 years ago from Northern California, USA

      Congratulations on your 50th installment. What a testament to how valuable your information is to us all. Thank you for continuing this series. I still don't know how you do it all, but I'm grateful that you do.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      LOL...got ya, Kevin!

    • The Examiner-1 profile image

      The Examiner-1 2 years ago

      I do not have anything to sell yet. When I said the 'future', I meant the 'far future'.

      Kevin

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Hey, Kevin, thanks, and I'm glad you found this useful. If you have a specific question about selling, fire away.

    • The Examiner-1 profile image

      The Examiner-1 2 years ago

      Hi Billy, I have read another one that had at least two useful sections for the present. Knowing the genre and the one about your characters. One for the future is selling the book. I voted up, shared and pinned it.

      Kevin

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Oh Heidi, that's not snarky. You're out of practice if you think that was snarky. LOL You need to get back on the snarky horse and ride, lady, ride!!!!!

      LOL...great comment...thanks for your pearls of wisdom.

      bill

    • heidithorne profile image

      Heidi Thorne 2 years ago from Chicago Area

      See, I told you I would be catching up on my billybuc reading! :) So much in the Mailbag this week...

      Creative/Correct Grammar, Etc. for Non-Fiction. Agreed, non-fiction is not really suited for "creativity" in this area, although some non-fiction works are (such as memoirs). Again, as always: Who is the audience and what would they be expecting?

      Mystery Markets. The mystery/thriller/suspense type problem is just as problematic in non-fiction, too. Under Business BISAC categories, I can choose small business, entrepreneurship, marketing... a whole bunch of options. So which one do I choose? Well, again, I look at the market. Who would be reading the book? In my world, there's quite a sea of difference between small business and entrepreneurs (really, there is). So you really have to look at which subset of the market will be attracted to your work.

      Time Talk. When I even look at some of the stuff I wrote a few years ago, there's a difference in current vernacular even in that short a time. And, yes, the vernacular can seriously date a work. For business and other non-fiction, that can be an issue that can affect sales, possibly necessitating a revised edition. If writing period fiction, always look to written, spoken or video (for later periods of course) works written in and for that period to get clues as to what was popular language use at the time. It changes fast! Remember the 80s Valley Girl talk? That was barely a few decades ago. Also watch for HOW they communicate, not just words. Non-verbal "language" can change over time, too. Flash me a peace sign!

      Ebooks... Again. Whether to do an ebook or not as a first-book effort will depend on a number of factors. Primary in my mind is whether the author has a writing track record... anywhere. If the author has no or minimal published writing portfolio, online or off, it would probably take a miracle for an agent or publisher to express an interest in the work. As with ALL writing, you gotta build a fan base and audience. Sometimes publishing and promoting an ebook is a way to do that if the author has a minimal writing resume. If you're not willing to market your work and build a market for it, clearly, you're not quite ready for primetime.

      Told ya I'd be back with my snarky comments. :) Have a great day!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Frank, hopefully I've got another fifty in me, and i can "count" on you to keep score for me. :) Thanks, buddy.

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      Frank Atanacio 2 years ago from Shelton

      fifty, but whose counting? Im not I am just enjoying this piece of heaven via mailbags.. It's given you a good reputation in my eyes and I hope to see fifty more, but remember..whose counting? Not me

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Faith, what a fantastic question. I was just thinking about that the other day as I read one of the cover reviews. Did they really read it??? Sometimes I'm a bit skeptical. I'll have an answer for you Monday. Until then, blessings always.

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Alicia. I always look forward to them too. It's been a fun series for us all.

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 2 years ago from southern USA

      Happy Big 5 0, Bill! Time flies when you're passing on useful information.

      Interesting question about being mindful to make sure our younger characters are speaking like the young of today or whatever time period is appropriate. I find that spending a lot of time with those a couple of decades younger truly does open one's eyes as to their jargon ... so-to-speak. Cool is still cool.

      I tend to always lump mystery/thriller/suspense together as it seems thriller/suspense do lend to some sort of mystery behind the suspense.

      Hey ...dumb question about the great reviews on the back of published novels by other well known authors/persons: Please excuse my ignorance on this, but are novels that are soon to be published sent out to an audience of peers for preview? How early would that process have to take place before the date of publication? I am just curious as it stands to reason the pre-published book must be sent out, but is it sent out by the publisher or the agent and do you know how they choose who will read it in advance? Well, I went over the one question LOL Sorry.

      Blessings always to you and your lovely Bev

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      I always look forward to your mailbag hubs, Bill. Thanks for yet another useful article. Congratulations on the upcoming anniversary of the series.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Melissa, your comment is the definition of optimism. Tuesday and the week is flying by. LOL Thanks for being here all year long.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I would agree, Linda, and thank you for pointing that out so clearly.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Kim, I can definitely appreciate a good pun...thanks for the chuckle and for being here.

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I do understand, Zulma, and it is a tough question and a tough thing to do...more on Monday. Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Very true, Maj! This is a lesson I had to learn the hard way, but why should it be any different than all the other lessons I've learned the hard way. :) Thank you for being here and Happy Tuesday to you.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Chris, thanks for that anecdote. I'm not sure there are any steadfast rules. I think your case is a perfect example.

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      Melissa Propp 2 years ago from Minnesota

      Hi Bill, I had yesterday off so I missed my Monday morning shout out! Fifty installments...not too shabby! Thanks as always for brightening my week with your words of wisdom. And its Tuesday already, so the week is flying by for me!

    • Linda Pogue profile image

      Linda Pogue 2 years ago from Missouri

      The question of current vernacular is always interesting. Most of the time I just write, and whatever vernacular used is that of the character. I have one short story where country dialect is used almost too much, since it is the only first person story I have written to date. Most of my readers seem to like it in that instance, though.

      Vernacular has to fit the character, not the other way around. Forcing a character to speak in a certain way is awkward.

      I think the vernacular is part of character development. Would you agree?

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You aren't alone, Carol. I'll address this Monday. Thank you for another great question.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Flourish! It's been loads of fun.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Bill! Nobody is as surprised by the fifty as I am....it's been a great run. Have a productive and happy week.

    • carol7777 profile image

      carol stanley 2 years ago from Arizona

      I was feeling discouraged today about where I am going with my book...andI am sure many often feel this way. Any ideas from you to keep the spirit and writing going when things are not happening the way want. I may have some ideas here but I would love to know what you do.

    • ocfireflies profile image

      ocfireflies 2 years ago from North Carolina

      Lots of great info and since this is the 50th, I think that speaks "volumes." Sorry, I just couldn't help myself.

      Smiles,

      Kim

    • phoenix2327 profile image

      Zulma Burgos-Dudgeon 2 years ago from United Kingdom

      Nadine's question struck a chord with me. How exactly does one maintain the character's voice without your own slipping in? I suppose you can research the slang/colloquialism of the time, but how do you make it sound authentic? By that I mean how do you make it seem like your character really talks that way and no just the authour crow barring in some words to make him sound real. I know this seems convoluted but I don't know how to make my meaning clearer. Hope you understand what I'm getting at.

    • travmaj profile image

      travmaj 2 years ago from australia

      Many congratulations - look forward to the next fifty. I found the characters use of dialogue interesting and useful. One of my efforts was set back in the 1950s and this was/is challenging. Not using modern speech can be difficult.

    • cam8510 profile image

      Chris Mills 2 years ago from Maple City, Michigan

      Bill, just a comment about grammar in nonfiction. I did a free write a year and a half ago about a vehicle I had at the time and was very fond of. For some reason, I started writing in this strange, country voice and used it through the entire writing. It became a hub and people had fun reading it. The whole thing was true, so it couldn't be called creative fiction. Of course just because I could do it, and did do it, doesn't mean I should have done it.

      Congratulations on a great year of Mail Bag hubs. I've enjoyed them.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Eric, I honestly don't think "cool" was ever out of style. If so I missed it...might have been during my drinking period. LOL Thanks, buddy. Enjoy that chill pill.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Mantita....Golden for sure, my friend.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Congratulations on 50 Hubs in a series. What an achievement!

    • bdegiulio profile image

      Bill De Giulio 2 years ago from Massachusetts

      Hi Bill. Another great installment of the mailbag. Can't believe it's been 50 weeks. Would love to see another 50? Have a great week.

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 2 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      I loved the part about time travelling word usage. I have real issues with that. I have a 33 year old daughter and a 5 year old son. And I am from the fifties and my wife from the seventies. I note that after a thirty year absence "cool" is now cool again. And "right on" is understood by all. And did I mention that my East Coast child thinks my West Coast words are so "60's retro"? I s'pose I will have to take a chill pill and drift on the whole shabang.

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      manatita44 2 years ago from london

      50 and counting, Bro. Congratulations. I forgot, is this Golden Anniversary? I think so.

      Another wonderful and useful Mailbag. Best wishes

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Lizzy, what an interesting question. I've never thought about that, but I will now. Sorry you have to wait a week, but thank you.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I will for sure, Bill, and I greatly appreciate you being here each week.

    • DzyMsLizzy profile image

      Liz Elias 2 years ago from Oakley, CA

      Oh, groan! Here it is Monday, and I've only just thought of a new question, so now I'll have to wait a week, chomping at the bit for time to pass and find the answer. LOL

      This time, I want to know how you know, or if and when, that a book work in progress is a single book, or is going to turn into a series?

      Do you have that planned before you start to write, or does the book dictate that as you move along?

    • Homeplace Series profile image

      William Leverne Smith 2 years ago from Hollister, MO

      I'm just as surprised to have been here to read all fifty, it seems. Keep them coming!! ;-)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      drbj, like you, I don't have time to b.s......down hard and dirty, that's what I give, and it's always the truth as I know it. I don't know how to do it any other way. Thank you for the kind words. They are deeply appreciated.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      LOL..Larry, that's great. You just made my day. Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, I'm laughing. I haven't been to a doctor in twelve years. The aches come and the aches go. It takes longer now for them to leave but eventually they do. In the meantime, I'm loving life and that's all that counts.

      Thank you dear friend. Happy Monday to you.

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      FatBoyThin, I totally agree that writers are as different as people. I don't outline my novels like many writers do. I had one writer tell me that was crazy. Oh well. :) Thank you!

    • drbj profile image

      drbj and sherry 2 years ago from south Florida

      You may have dampened the unrealistic aspirations of a few writers, Bill, with your down-to-earth and valuable info about book publishing. But one of the reasons your hubs have been so widely read and successful is because your info is realistic and learned from experience.

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      Larry Rankin 2 years ago from Oklahoma

      Certainties in life: death, taxes, and the weekly mailbag. I only enjoy one of these things. I'll let you guess which.

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      Ann Carr 2 years ago from SW England

      I'm sure any magazine would be interested in your mailbag series. It's so instructive and informative, how can anyone not find it interesting and useful. Congrats on your achievement of almost a year! I think it'll go on as long as you want it to.

      Interesting questions and answers as always, particularly regarding the non-fiction grammar.

      Hope your Monday's great too. Just finished in the garden and have the aches to prove it! Ho, hum... such is age. I ignore it and hope it'll go away; fat chance!

      Ann :)

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      Colin Garrow 2 years ago from Kinneff, Scotland

      I think your advice about character bios is great, Bill. Of course, I won't ever take that advice myself, since I never plan anything, but I realise that writers are as different as people - we all need to do things in ways that work for us, so whatever works, has to be the right way. Another great Hub.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Buildreps, I can't do that. My friends would stop talking to me. :) Thanks my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Carol, I think it's vital that your voice shine through, and if grammar has to take a hit for that to happen then so be it. Thank you for the great question.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You and me both, Sha! LOL I'm so far out of it you need a satellite image to find me. :) But somehow we manage, don't we? :)_

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Nadine, the same goes for me. I can't wrap my brain around the dialogue of a ten year old no matter how hard I try. :) Thanks for stopping by and have a great week.

    • Buildreps profile image

      Buildreps 2 years ago from Europe

      Amazing series with awesome answers, billybuc. Almost a year gone by. I think it's still a pity you don't want to run for president :D

    • carol7777 profile image

      carol stanley 2 years ago from Arizona

      Thanks for a great answer and it really does make lots of sense. I just have to be careful not to get carried away..or maybe I should.

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 2 years ago from Central Florida

      I love your answer to Nadine's question. I'm not even sure I'd realize the character was using language from the '60s or '70s because I still do! I can see how easy it would be for a Boomer writer to make that mistake. I'm afraid if much of today's slang were in a book I choose to read, I'd have no clue what was being said.

    • Nadine May profile image

      Nadine May 2 years ago from Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa

      That was an interesting point you shared about the dialog of a today thirty year old male that should never sound like a pensioner! For that reason I cannot write children stories. I have no young grandchildren around to know how they talk.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      DJ, I understand about writing over four decades. I did that with Resurrecting Tobias, and it is a serious challenge. As for your mime, I'd fire that wench and get myself a new one who works cheaper. :)

      Thanks as always, dear friend.

      Bill

    • profile image

      DJ Anderson 2 years ago

      Great info, as usual.

      The speech used for the time period was of great interest to me.

      And, as I have moved through four generations, it proved to be

      quite the challenge.

      Mime still missing. I have resorted to starting at the beginning to

      make any corrections and clarify any spoken parts. It is helping to get my mind back into the storyline.

      Many thanks, Bill. And, congrats on your 50th!

      DJ.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Great points, Brian, and I thank you for them. I ran into a similar situation recently using the word "that" and I wasn't aware of it. I am now. :)

      I hope you have a splendid week, my friend, and thank you again.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Pop! I appreciate it very much.

    • B. Leekley profile image

      Brian Leekley 2 years ago from Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA

      Good questions. Good answers.

      Something to keep in mind about rules of grammar and punctuation is that many of them have more to do with convention and consistency than with logic and clarity. A professional copy editor follows one or another of the major style guides. They differ from one another significantly. (See the article "Writing Style Guides" in Wikipedia.) Conventions, for instance, are different in England than in America (e.g., whether the period goes inside or outside the endquote mark), different over time (e.g., whether to put two spaces after each period), different for academic than for general publications, and so on. I just learned recently that "off of" and "off" (as in "take it off/off of the table") are both right but that "off" is more right in formal English--according to the English.

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      breakfastpop 2 years ago

      Time certain does fly when you are learning so much. You are a wealth of good information.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Awww, thank you Sally! Maybe one day I'll give magazines a go and see if anyone is interested in this series. Until then, it's just gratifying to know my friends enjoyed it.

      Happy Monday my friend.

      bill

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      Sally Gulbrandsen 2 years ago from Norfolk

      Billy,

      Well done on fifty issues in this series. Amazing how quickly the time has flown by. I can see this series in a book or published in a Weekly Column for Writers in one of our most popular Writers Magazines.

      See you next week:)

      Sally

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks John! It's been a blast for sure. Thank you for being a part of it.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Janine. I just happen to have great and loyal friends who keep this series alive. I appreciate you. Too hot here but I'll try to enjoy it. Happy Monday to you.

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      John Hansen 2 years ago from Queensland Australia

      Wow Bill, a year of mailbags has gone so quickly, and still going strong. Great job with this one as always.

    • Janine Huldie profile image

      Janine Huldie 2 years ago from New York, New York

      As always great advice and love that this series has been going on for as long as it has. Definitely a credit to you, Bill! Happy Monday and have a wonderful week ahead now ;)