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The Writer's Mailbag: Installment One-Hundred and One

Updated on June 6, 2016

Let’s Start in on the Next One-hundred, Shall We?

I see no reason why we shouldn’t do it all again. The questions continue to be first-rate and I’m still having fun, so let’s see what this week has in store for us all.

TWO FROM ANN

“What do you do when a series comes to an end? It occurred to me that one could use a different character in the series and see the same story from his or her point of view; would this work? I think it might be too complicated but I'd be interested to hear your view on the matter.”

Ann, I really don’t think that’s complicated at all. In fact, I think it’s refreshing to do that.

A mystery/thriller writer I greatly enjoy, Robert Crais, has a series about a Los Angeles P.I. named Elvis Cole. Occasionally he’ll do a book through the eyes of Cole’s best friend, Joe Pike. Same series but told from two different perspectives, and it is quite effective. I’m actually toying with this idea with my first novel, The 12/59 Shuttle From Yesterday to Today. I’m thinking of writing a sequel through the eyes of the daughter, and a prequel through another character’s eyes.

Anyway, to answer your question, I see no problem in doing it at all.

Another question from Ann: “During your book signings have you ever had anyone who's been confrontational or rude about your work? On the other hand, has anyone been so complimentary that it's bordered on embarrassing? Just wondered how people react first-hand to your fame - or is it notoriety? Just kidding, notoriety of course!”

No fame at all, Ann, but thank you. I’m attempting to become the greatest writer no one has ever heard of. Wish me luck. LOL

No, I have never had a confrontational encounter at a book signing or reading and no, I’ve never had comments so praising as to be embarrassing. Usually it’s just polite people being supportive and saying nice things, for which I’m very grateful. I’ve actually found complete strangers to be very kind when I’m out in public, and that should be encouraging for all writers.

We've got mail!
We've got mail! | Source

Ridiculous Freelance Pay

From Tarunponders: “I began my freelance writing journey around 4 years back. When I started out I signed up with Up work. Looking at the job postings then used to scare me. There were jobs paying a mere 25-50 cents per 100 words. This to me was absurd. As a writer I thought writing was also viewed as a commodity and buyers wanted to buy it as if they were buying vegetables. I had started out then so settled for a mere 1 dollar per 100 words sometimes (never settled for 25 cents jobs though) though my writing was of a much higher quality than the amount paid. Some jobs also paid 2 dollars per 100 words. Having spend 4 years in the industry my writing skills have improved manifold and I can write as good as anyone or maybe better. My question therefore is - Is asking a 4-5 dollar per 100 words a very high price that I am asking for when there are jobs which easily pay 10 dollar onwards per 100 words? Also can you please guide me to some fair resources where they don't discriminate me coz I am an Indian and probably pay me less. I am willing to take a paid membership as long as I get higher paying jobs requisite to my skills. Please do advice based on your experience sites that pay fairly for the writing they get done.”

Tarun, I’m going to answer your first question first because, well, I’m anal that way.

Is asking 4-5 dollars per 100 words a high price? No, not at all! Quite frankly, a good writer is worth five times that much…but…and there’s always a but….can you get that much? That’s the question that needs to be faced. Will the market allow you to ask that much and will the market pay that much? These are supply and demand questions which have been asked for decades by all people who have a service to sell.

Is your product worth that much? Only you can answer that. Your second question asks where you can find better-paying writing jobs, and that is a bit tricky in its answer. I have a freelance friend who believes strongly in Textbroker and makes good money on that site. I’ve found good-paying gigs on Craigslist, believe it or not….but….the best-paying gigs I have are ones I found by walking around my home town and asking business owners. Local businesses like local writers. It’s a face they can relate to and communicate to rather than some stranger with an email address.

Go to this site…..http://www.freelancewriting.com/freelance-writing-jobs.php….and shop around.

And good luck!

Repeat after me: I am worth more than slave wages as a writer!
Repeat after me: I am worth more than slave wages as a writer! | Source

Book Editors

From Mary: “I have a question for a future mailbag about editors. Are book editors specific to one genre? Also do they charge by the amount of pages, by hour, or perhaps number of rewrite?”

Mary, in the order of your questions, the answers are sometimes, yes, yes and yes.

Next question please!

I’ve known editors who will only edit science fiction. I’ve known some who will only edit technical books about astronomy, and I’ve known editors who will take any gig thrown at them. Rather than worry about that, try to find an editor with a great track record. Ask who they have worked for in the past and then contact those people and ask their opinion of that editor.

As for charging for an editing job, I’ve seen it done all three ways. $25 per hour…..so much per page…extra charge for re-write….re-write included in original quote. Again, shop around. You’ll get a feel for what is the industry standard once you do a few Google searches.

A very good editor is worth the money they charge. The tough part is finding a very good editor who charges what you can pay. I don’t know many independent writers who can afford top-notch editors, so search as long as it takes to find the perfect marriage.

The loss of a loved one can be very hard to write about
The loss of a loved one can be very hard to write about | Source

Raw Emotions

From Babby: “For the Mailbag: What are your thoughts on writing through grief? Is it possible to be objective enough to glean good stories from our sometimes tragic situations? Can we ever really distance ourselves enough to tell the story? I have a first draft that's been gathering dust for about six years now because it's still too emotionally raw.”

Well my friend, I’m no grief counselor. All I have is my own experience. The biggest loss in my life was the death of my father, when I was twenty, and I’ve written about it several times, and it has helped to write about it, but….and there’s that but again…..it took me literally decades to reach that point in the process. When I was sixty I was ready and not a minute before….so…..

It will happen when it happens for you. In the meantime, take good care of that first draft gathering dust, and one day I’m sure you’ll sit down and allow yourself to tell the story.

A resource on writing from yours truly

And That’s a Wrap

I’ve got things to do. You’ve got things to do. I suggest we all get to doing them.

I’m going to shamelessly tell you that my latest Billy the Kid novella will be released by June 15th. This is a brand-new story, never seen on HubPages, so I thought I’d mention that for those of you who enjoyed the series of short stories here.

And the Writer’s Mailbag Podcast is getting closer to a reality. I’ll let you know when we hit the airwaves.

And that’s it! Have a superb week of writing and living, and I’ll see you next week.

2016 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

“Helping writers to spread their wings and fly.”

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    • Janine Huldie profile image

      Janine Huldie 11 months ago from New York, New York

      Loved that you are still going with this and truly more great advice packed into this one once again. Thanks so much again for always putting yourself out there and sharing your tried and true advice. Have a wonderful Monday now, Bill!! ;)

    • Buildreps profile image

      Buildreps 11 months ago from Europe

      Good morning, Bill. That was a nice and short mailbag. :) I wish you a great week as well.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      It's my pleasure, Janine, and thanks for always being here. Happy Monday my friend. Let's make this the best Monday ever.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Buildreps! Happy Monday to you!

    • cygnetbrown profile image

      Donna Brown 11 months ago from Alton, Missouri

      Hi Bill! Babby's question about writing through grief really hit home with me. I started back at writing after both my husband and I lost our jobs, our home, and our car back in 2008. I was going to a psychologist at the time who suggested that I journal my experience. My husband went to jail because he could not pay his child support of his eldest daughter because he could not find a job. (Friends helped me get the funds to get him out of jail.) I daily wrote in my journal and at the same time I worked on finishing my book When God Turned His Head. A lot of the painful scenes of the book was fueled by the pain of loss that I felt at the time. Though the circumstances in the book are different, the pain portrayed in the book was channeled from my own experience.

    • breakfastpop profile image

      breakfastpop 11 months ago

      For the most part, many writing sites take advantage of writers. Writing for pennies is insulting. I write for HP because of the community of writers.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you for sharing that, Donna! A great example of the healing power of words.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      As do I, Pop...no other reason...the money is a joke....are you listening, HP?????????

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 11 months ago from southern USA

      Well, I popped in at number five, so that is pretty close to being first to comment. haha I'm enjoying this Monday off and maybe I'll be able to get some writing done too.

      I'm thrilled this series is starting on the second 100 count, and I'm sure we'll see that 200 too.

      Good advice there about the personal losses.

      Hey, being you were a school teacher, what can you offer to help prepare young minds to appreciate writing, now and for the rest of their lives?

      Peace and blessings always

    • Venkatachari M profile image

      Venkatachari M 11 months ago from Hyderabad, India

      A nice mailbag with good questions and great answers. I hope to see you achieve the 200 mark also soon.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Faith, number five is pretty darned good. Way to go!!! Is it a holiday and I'm not aware of it? What are you doing home?

      Thanks for a great question. Answer in seven days.

      Peace, blessings and hugs heading your way.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Well thank you Venkatachari M. I do too. That will mean I'll live at least another three years. LOL

    • Blond Logic profile image

      Mary Wickison 11 months ago from Brazil

      Hi Bill,

      Thanks for answering my question.

      Regarding writing through grief, I suspect some of the best books, songs and films were written from experiencing grief and the pain of the moment.

      An excellent mailbag as always.

      Have a productive week.

    • always exploring profile image

      Ruby Jean Fuller 11 months ago from Southern Illinois

      When I first started writing, everything was personal and full of grief. Sometimes I think it's good to get that out of the way so, maybe you can write something interesting. Just my opinion. Keep on doing what you do best, helping others spread their wing's.

    • Babbyii profile image

      Barb Johnson 11 months ago from Alaska's Kenai Peninsula

      Delighted to hear that you'll be continuing on towards a second hundred mailbags Bill. Thanks for sharing your heartfelt thoughts and advice on writing painful things. Have an encouraging week!

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 11 months ago from SW England

      Thank you for answering both my questions, bill. It's refreshing to know that my idea isn't as daft as I thought! I asked the question before I'd read your story about Sheila!

      I'm glad you've never encountered any controversy with your public. I've heard stories about others (famous ones) but that may well have been their own fault, who knows?

      It's been a lazy Monday here as a kind visitor from Australia has given us a couple of days off from working on the house! Just as well as it's very muggy weather at the moment; waiting for a storm to clear the air.

      Have a marvellous Monday, bill!

      Ann :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Mary and I suspect you are correct about grief....I appreciate your thoughts.

      Happy Monday to you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      I totally agree, Ruby, and I greatly appreciate you being here each and every week.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks for the question, Babby. I suspect quite a few writers have worked their way through such emotions.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, those kinds of visitors I am always happy to have. LOL Heat continues here but a break on the horizon. Thank goodness because I am no longer a fan of hot weather.

      Thank you for the questions....and thank you for being you.

      bill

    • mpropp profile image

      Melissa Propp 11 months ago from Minnesota

      Happy Monday Bill! Who says all good things must come to an end? Keep the mailbag rolling! I love it when people ask questions that I never even knew I had....always learning from you. Have a wonderful week of productivity!

    • Tarunponders profile image

      Tarun Chhauda 11 months ago from Roorkee, India

      Hi Bill,

      Thanks indeed for responding to my question. And yes you are right when you say - Is the product worth it? Being a self-critic I do that often times. I realize that many a times we writers are puffed up with a lot of vanity and fail to understand if the market is fair or not. But I am myself grounded on this as I do tend to keep a check on whether I am being reasonable or not asking for a certain amount. I also liked the video you inserted which talks about the negotiation bit for a freelance writer. It clearly indicates not going way lower than what the client is likely to pay if he goes ahead with a native writer instead of an outside writer.

      With regards to the second question - I am not too sure if Textbroker works for India too but I shall check. To pay a real tribute to your response I already applied to one of the craiglist listings from the link you supplied. So lets see what comes out of it. Also you were spot on the local businesses thing - My business mind keeps suggesting me that if I venture out locally and hand out my visiting card I might end up bagging a better gig than what hours of applying online might not get. Besides being a localite I might get offered some free tea coupled with some local gossip LOL.

      Another question which emerges out of the above which probably you can answer in 102 is - Are their websites where one can get his writing skills tested/assessed by experts. I am sure HP is also a great place to hone up ones skills as one is surrounded by literary prowess all around but are their others?

      Thanks again for your valuable inputs. Have a great weekend ahead.

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 11 months ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      Just a great big thank you. I learned a lot.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 11 months ago from USA

      With the grief issue I think there must be a little distance and self-processing so that the emotions aren't raw and unrelatable. I've read popular works where the grief just seemed like navel gazing and detracted significantly from the plot and fullness of the characters.

    • manatita44 profile image

      manatita44 11 months ago from london

      Excellent...excellent writing and great questions and answers. yes, welcome to 101. Oh! Is this a Hitchcock thriller? ha ha.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Melissa, thank you my friend. It's always nice to see you pop up...Happy Work Week to you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Eric! so did I!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Flourish, I can think of no value in navel gazing. LOL Thanks for the chuckle.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Tarun, there are such websites and if you can wait until next Monday I will share them with you. Thank you for being here and I'm glad you found some value n the answers.

      Blessings always

    • bdegiulio profile image

      Bill De Giulio 11 months ago from Massachusetts

      Great week for the mailbag Bill. I have no doubt that we will see installment 200 sometime in 2018. Have a wonderful week.

    • PAINTDRIPS profile image

      Denise McGill 11 months ago from Fresno CA

      Great advice and good info, once again. Thanks for answering questions I always wondered about and didn't ask anyone. I found this very informative.

      Blessings,

      Denise

    • Michael-Milec profile image

      Michael-Milec 11 months ago

      Great answers to quality questions confirming the top seriousness of the existing writers, as well as leading toward what "we" desire /purpose to be.

    • Tarunponders profile image

      Tarun Chhauda 11 months ago from Roorkee, India

      Hi Bill,

      I shall surely wait to hear from you next Monday. Never want to miss out on an opportunity which will help me excel as a writer. So please keep them coming.

      Thanks again

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you so very much, Manatita.....no thriller here! LOL

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      I'm having fun, Bill, so why not 200? Thanks my friend and Happy Tuesday to you.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      You are very welcome, Denise. Thank you for the question and for being here.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Michael my friend, thank you so much. Blessings to you and yours on this sunny Tuesday.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      I will see you then, Tarun! Thank you again!

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 11 months ago from Houston, Texas

      I always enjoy these question and answer sessions of yours and continually learn from them. Good luck on the launch of your new book.

    • social thoughts profile image

      social thoughts 11 months ago from New Jersey

      Bill,

      Yay! Another mailbag! :)

      I am surprised to learn that there are editors 'only' for specific genres. That sounds silly to me. It may be more enjoyable to edit your preference, but...really?

      As for the "Raw Emotions" question, I think any event that touches anyone that much will come up over and over. If we follow an author long enough we'll see their grieving process and probably gain perspective on something we're going through at the same time.

    • shanmarie profile image

      Shannon 11 months ago from Texas

      The greatest writer no one has ever heard of? Ha! That's a good one. Funny. And false. Someday you will be a bestseller. LOL

      And Iove your answer to the last question, by the way.

    • lifegate profile image

      William Kovacic 11 months ago from Pleasant Gap, PA

      Another good week of questions an answers. there seemed to be a bit more variety this week, but it's all good. We're ready for another hundred!

    • heidithorne profile image

      Heidi Thorne 11 months ago from Chicago Area

      Happy 101st Mailbag!

      Re: Ridiculous Freelance Pay. It IS ridiculous. Agreed, supply and demand is a factor. However, what demand are you supplying? If you want to supply cheap labor, then these freelance sites are a good bet for you. Billybuc, like you, I prefer to work with clients, emphasis on the word "clients," not "buyers"--totally different animals.

      Re: Editors. As an editor for nonfiction book authors, I will tell you that getting an editor who understands your market and genre is far superior than one who can edit "anything." I charge a package price for books up to a certain number of words, plus an overcharge for any words over that count. I think that's fair and way more customer-friendly than by-the-hour. Yes, good editors are worth the money you'll spend. Not just saying that because I'm an editor. ;) And remember there's a difference between "editing" and "proofreading." (Sad that I often have to explain that.) Know what you're buying.

      Have a wonderful week ahead!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you so much, Peggy! At this stage in my writing career, I could use all the luck in the world.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Very, very true, Kailey, about the grieving process. I don't see how it can be avoided by a writer, and a devoted follower will notice it.

      Thanks for a great insight.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Shanmarie, if I make the bestseller list, does that mean I failed in my goal? LOL Thanks a ton for being here.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Bill. You are appreciated.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Heidi, you make such a great point about editors vs proofreaders. I don't know if it's possible to explain that to someone who has never had a professional editor but it's the truth. Thanks for mentioning that.

      Have a superb remainder of the week, my friend.

    • shanmarie profile image

      Shannon 11 months ago from Texas

      Not at all. I pick up books quite often alerting me to the fact that author is a New York Times Best Selling Author. Yet I never knew of that author until I picked up the book! Of course, if you go Stephen King or J.K. Rowling kind of best selling. . .Well then, my friend, you failed. LOL

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      LOL....Shannon, you had me laughing out loud. No worries about me failing. LOL Thanks for the laugh.

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 11 months ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Useful questions and you answered in a direct and helpful way.

    • Gypsy Rose Lee profile image

      Gypsy Rose Lee 11 months ago from Riga, Latvia

      Another great mailbag. I remember searching for writing jobs myself and started doing some content writing work. I tell you it made me wonder what in the world they were thinking about when I was asked to write about 400 words and then rewrite these same words in five different ways. Anyway I don't do any of that now because it would just drive me up the wall. Hope you are having a great and progressive week.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you so much, DDE!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks for sharing that, Rasma! It drove me up a wall too; that's why I went out and found my own customers. Skip the middle man altogether.

    • rajan jolly profile image

      Rajan Singh Jolly 11 months ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      Bill, I really love this educational series of questions and answers. Glad to see you are keeping it alive and thanks to those who keep posting great questions.

    • Frank Atanacio profile image

      Frank Atanacio 11 months ago from Shelton

      I can sense the start of something big mailbag 101.. :) writing through grief was a very good question

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      I really enjoy it, Rajan, so let's keep it going.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Frank! I'll see you for the next 99 installments, buddy, and we'll reach 200 together.

    • MizBejabbers profile image

      MizBejabbers 11 months ago

      Bill, I must have missed this mailbag because I was out of town most of last week. I’m so glad I found it because it is one of your best. Tarun made a statement (actually a question) about discrimination because he is an Indian. It is hard to believe that someone would discriminate because of one's nationality or ethnicity in writing. The work should speak for itself. If he feels that his nationality is an issue of discrimination, perhaps he should use a pen name. Some female writers got their start by using male pen names or initials.

      Good mailbag, now I'll start on your latest one. Just wanted to read 101 first.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Great suggestion, MizB....I agree about the pen name. Thanks for mentioning that.

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      Deb Hirt 11 months ago from Stillwater, OK

      Wonderful topics this week, and I'm learning so much! Thank you, as always.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      And thank you as always, Deb!

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 11 months ago

      Good reading from to the mailbag today. Just a thought, I am a Star Wars fan and often wonder if the author will ever end his series. Guess he has read your post on adding characters. Have a great week, Bill.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Dee, I hate to admit this, but I didn't know it was the same author of the Star Wars series. LOL Didn't have a clue. Thanks for ending my ignorance on that subject, and of course, thanks for being here.

    • lawrence01 profile image

      Lawrence Hebb 11 months ago from Hamilton, New Zealand

      Bill

      Wow! Awesome that we made it to 101! Sorry it's taken me a few weeks to get here but I've had a few things to work through and I don't think I was ready for this mailbag until I'd dealt with them!

      For me this was a really encouraging mailbag showing that I'm not 'alone' in the writing world struggling on.

      That was awesome!

      Lawrence

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Lawrence, glad you are here. I'm way behind in my comments so I'm sorry, and thank you stopping by. You are never late to the Mail Room.

      bill

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 11 months ago from Central Florida

      So glad you're going for another one hundred installments, Bill. Your readership is growing, so I'm sure you'll have plenty of fuel for the mailbag.

      I'd like to reach out to Tarun. Tarun, you should be looking for gigs that pay by the word, not by groups of 100. The link Bill gave you is a great resource. Sign up for their newsletter to get daily postings of freelance opportunities. You'll have to apply - or pitch - each gig that appeals to you, but they pay much better than the mills. Most listings are for magazines and/or businesses looking for quality copy. Also, search the net for copy houses that have a group of writers available to undertake campaigns for them. You'll have to go through some testing in order to be considered and, if you pass, jobs will be offered infrequently at first. Once you've established yourself, you'll see that you'll be offered more gigs, especially if they have clients that use their services exclusively. If the client likes your work, they'll request you.

      Look for gigs that pay at least $0.25/word. That's $75 USD for 300 words. Work yourself up from there. Be sure to build your portfolio as you go. If you can get gigs that offer you the byline, that's gold for building your credibility and your portfolio.

      It'll take some time to get yourself to where you want to be in the freelance world. Take my advice and don't give up your day job until you're established enough to pay your overhead. Trust me. I know of what I speak.

      Good luck!

    • Tarunponders profile image

      Tarun Chhauda 11 months ago from Roorkee, India

      Hi Bravewarrior,

      Thanks indeed for your concern and the all important guidance. Sometimes as a writer it becomes very frustrating when you get paid less by unworthy content mills. Being in India I also feel that there is a sense of discrimination of paying less because I am an Indian. Though for me this is kind of un-understandable that why it is the way it is. I can understand being paid a little lesser considering outsourcing should turn out cheaper but a whole lot lesser wouldnt make sense to me. Especially so if I write as good as my counterpart. Anyhow I shall certainly follow the instructions you leave above and try and see what comes up. Regarding the copy houses also I need to research to see if something comes up but that seems like a good option considering that I am from an advertising background. Also I checked your profile and feel so good knowing that you are a poet as I am one too (though not a very accomplished one). As for your last piece of advice - I actually work as a full time writer so I dont have the luxury of chucking up my day jobs anymore. I have done that enough times before. I believe I was never a job material and writing has helped me in more ways than one. Thanks again for your sincere guidance and I shall work towards the accomplishment of the same. I also left my email in your fan mail. Every word you said above counts for me as I am still on this journey so thanks again.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Sha, thanks for sharing your expertise and experience with Tarun. That's what I envisioned when I started this series...writers helping writers...so again, thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Tarun, I was afraid you wouldn't check back and see Sha's comment. Good deal for all!

    • Tarunponders profile image

      Tarun Chhauda 11 months ago from Roorkee, India

      Hi Bill,

      I read it. Its so much beneficial for me. Thanks to you both for guiding me.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      I'm glad to hear that, Tarun! Thank you again and blessings always.

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