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Tips to Improve Your Fiction Writing

Updated on May 21, 2014

Are You Ready to Take Your Writing to a New Level?

What is it you are after as a writer?

It’s a valid question, and one I would hope you can answer.

What are you trying to achieve?

Hopefully, no matter what genre you write in, or what your visions of the future look like, one of your goals is to improve your writing. I would be blown away if any of you reading this stated that you could care less about improving.

For those of you who are fiction writers, let me ask you this: how’s it going for you? Or as Dr. Phil is fond of saying, “how’s that working out for you?”

Maybe you have a couple ebooks written and published, and they have received moderate success, but you would like to see your sales skyrocket with the next book that you publish.

Maybe you would like to attract the attention of a major publishing firm.

Maybe you would like to graduate from short stories to a novella, or God forbid, a full-length novel.

And maybe you would like to graduate from wannabe fiction writer to accomplished fiction writer.

If any of those describe you, then this article should help.

Write when you are most productive
Write when you are most productive | Source

Give Yourself a Fighting Chance By Maximizing Your Productivity

When are you most productive? I am a morning person. My best writing happens before noon. Once I have eaten lunch, my productivity takes a nosedive of mammoth proportions.

I am also most creative in the morning.

Knowing that, I schedule my writing time to match my productivity and creativity. I begin writing every morning at seven, and I rarely write in the afternoons. That does not mean I do nothing, however, after lunch. Those hours, from noon to four, are spent researching, editing, and working on blogs or my website.

So I ask you again: when are you most productive? Once you answer that question, you can schedule, hopefully, time each day to take advantage of your creative inner-clock.

Visit the Unknown to Expand As a Writer

We can all write about what we know. Anyone with any writing skills at all can take past memories and experiences and turn them into a story.

But…..

If we continue to do that, are we growing as writers?

I have a friend. We’ll call her DJ since I don’t have her permission to use her real name. Anyway, DJ is currently working on her first novel, and she has undertaken a challenge that would bring a water buffalo to his knees. She is writing a historical fiction based on World War 2, and each day is spent checking historical facts and being stunned by the sheer volume of research that she must do in order to achieve accuracy.

DJ’s example is extreme, but it is very helpful for any writer.

Growth occurs in any art form when the artist/writer/ musician steps out of their comfort level and is willing to risk entering the unknown.

Let me give you another example. My current novel, “Resurrecting Tobias,” is really a very comfortable story for me. A lot of “me” is in it. My next novel, “A Season for Killing,” is not comfortable at all. It is about a cold-blooded killing protagonist who must chase down and kill a serial killer.

I believe the next novel will be my best, and I believe that because it is forcing me to toss aside that which is comfortable, and embrace that which is anything but comfortable.

Try it!

Toss Aside the Mundane

I read a quote once from movie director James Cameron. He compared storytelling to taking your characters on a journey….and making it excruciating.

Great storytelling, in my opinion, is grabbing your readers by the throat and dragging them into a maelstrom of drama and action, so that, by the time the story has ended, they are perspiring and gasping. Great storytelling should be visceral as well as cerebral.

So, is your writing great storytelling, or is it mundane?

Whatever you have been doing, ratchet it up a notch or ten, and make it excruciatingly exciting.

Your readers will thank you for it.

Learn from the Masters

Please notice I did not say “read the masters.” Rather, I said to learn from them.

Take your favorite novel and dissect it. Take it apart aspect by aspect. How was it structured? What were its themes? How did the author maintain rhythm? How did they describe scenes, and how did they introduce their characters?

Great works are great for a reason. Perhaps you can learn those reasons by actually studying great writing? Perhaps, by even imitating great writing, you can produce great writing yourself?

It’s worth a try, don’t you think?

Give Them More Than They Paid For

The basic requirements for a novel to be publishable are great characters, a fascinating plot, and captivating language skills.

Those are the basic requirements.

But we want to go beyond basic, don’t we? We want our previously crawling infant of a story to strap on wings and soar, don’t we?

Give your readers more than is expected of you.

Toss in some historical information. Toss in some interesting geographical information.

Example: in my just-finished novel, I make reference to the Ice Age Missoula floods, which scoured the west and formed what is now eastern-Washington. It is an interesting geography lesson tossed into a reflective piece about the struggle of humanity.

That is the type of “extra” that your readers will appreciate. Heck, toss in a recipe or a store recommendation. Why not? As long as it does not distract from the story, why wouldn’t you do it?

There is a café in New Orleans called the “Café Du Monde.” I have seen it mentioned in at least ten novels over the years. You can bet that, when I next visit New Orleans, I will go to that café, and it is because several writers made the effort to give me a bonus in their novels.

We all share emotions, and a writer must write to that fact
We all share emotions, and a writer must write to that fact | Source

Get in Touch with Your Emotions

I have said this in countless articles already, but I’m going to keep saying it until I see all of you practicing it. We all share five senses. We all experience the thrill of taste, sight, touch, smell and sound. Use those senses to get in touch with your emotions, and use your emotions to bond with the emotions of your readers.

Characters, in order to seem real, must connect with us emotionally. This is a deal-breaker if you are a writer. If I want mundane, all I have to do is think back to my days in Catholic elementary school being taught sentence diagramming by Sister Mary Elizabeth.

But I don’t want mundane when I read. I want to feel what the characters should be feeling. If someone is murdered then I need to feel my bowels loosen and my stomach ball up in knots. If a loved one dies in a novel, I should feel the remorse that the surviving characters feel.

If I don’t feel those things, the author has failed.

Do you want to fail or do you want to succeed?

Describe what it feels like to dance, and not just mention that you are dancing
Describe what it feels like to dance, and not just mention that you are dancing | Source

Let Us See What the Characters See

And let us smell what the characters smell, and let us hear what they hear, and touch what they touch, and….and….and

Get it?

Don’t tell me that the character saw a child run across their lawn. Tell me the character’s memories of when she was like that child, running free with the wind in her hair, and a sense of never-ending freedom.

Don’t tell me that your protagonist kissed his wife goodnight and went to bed. Tell me that he tasted her love for him, and it reminded him of the first time they met, when he was sure he had died and gone to heaven because this beautiful creature deemed him worthy of a “hello.”

Get it?

That’s All for Today

Seriously, if you were to follow these suggestions, your writing would immediately rise to the next level….but will you follow them?

Do you want to improve, or are you just interested in gaining views, clicks, likes, and some residual money?

If you want to improve as a writer then get busy. It is within your capabilities. All you need now is willingness.

2014 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

“Helping writers to spread their wings and fly.”

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    • Janine Huldie profile image

      Janine Huldie 3 years ago from New York, New York

      I love that last line about getting busy, because as writers, I think we are so busy daily, but it is truly how you spend that busy time that makes or breaks you here, I suppose. Wonderful tips though as always and thanks again, Bill. Enjoy your day now!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Janine, I have known people who look terribly busy, and yet accomplish nothing. You are right, it is how you spend that busy time that will make or break you. Thanks for your thoughts my friend.

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 3 years ago from England

      My most productive time is afternoon, I can't function in the mornings! lol! never have been able too even when I was at work! to research a novel is no easy task, I remember when I wrote my book back in the 80s, it was about the 1349 black plague! LOL! imagine asking the librarian for that research book! and yes the book is still sitting in my drawer, and yes I should update it, lol! have a great day bill, nell

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Nell, honestly, I am a bit too lazy to write a novel based on a subject that requires that much research. LOL That's the truth. I just want to write and leave research to someone else more energetic. :) Thank you, Nell.

    • Radcliff profile image

      Liz Davis 3 years ago from Hudson, FL

      Fact That Only I Find Interesting: I visited Café Du Monde 10 years ago and missed a Kate Hudson sighting by one day.

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 3 years ago from Central Florida

      I love the idea of throwing real life facts and places in our fiction writing. It makes the story seem real. And research is necessary no matter what the story line is. Where ever you decide to set the story, you need to research the flora, architectural styles, foods, crops, accents, brogues, etc.

      My character Faith in The Gifts of Faith is a florist in Georgia. I researched native Georgian plant life in order to not get tripped up by any of my readers who happen to be from Georgia.

      It's the little details that make a difference. And you're so right about having a character reflect on an image or a situation rather than just report it. How droll would that be? I have the Sunday paper for that kind of reading.

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Isaac Weithers 3 years ago from The Caribbean

      More brilliant standards to rise toward! "More than they paid for" is the target I want to reach for, but of course I'd like to reach them all. Thank you for the great tips!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You are so wrong, Lizzy. I find that very interesting. I would love to visit that city again soon....and I would love for you to move to Olympia sooner. :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Good for you, Sha, for doing the research necessary. I did it for every city in my new book. One or two facts about an area lends authenticity to any book, and I think that's important.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      It's always my pleasure, Dora, and thank you so much for being here.

    • breakfastpop profile image

      breakfastpop 3 years ago

      Writing pure fiction would mean that I was definitely stepping out of my comfort zone. I don't think that it would be a bad thing. Thanks, billy. Up, interesting, extremely useful and awesome.

    • MarleneB profile image

      Marlene Bertrand 3 years ago from Northern California, USA

      One thing for sure about you, Bill is that you practice what you teach. In reading your first novel, I felt like I was truly on a journey with your character, wanting to be there when he took his next turn. I know your next novel will be a great adventure, too. My bags are packed and I'm ready to roll with Tobias.

    • epbooks profile image

      Elizabeth Parker 3 years ago from Las Vegas, NV

      Such a wonderfully informative hub. I've just sent my fifth thriller to the editors and although I love my other four, I think I love this one a teeny bit more as I created a character who was truly evil (in my mind anyway), but yet, at some points likeable. I know what you mean about stepping out of your comfort zone. With my book Phobia, I wrote it in first person which was SO much fun, but SOOO difficult because the main character had to see all...and the story had to be manipulated so that he could do that. It wasn't easy, but fun. :) Hope your books are an amazing success!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      It's always a pleasure, breakfastpop...thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Marlene, I've reserved a nice window seat for you. The bus leaves in about three weeks. :) Thank you dear friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Liz, thanks for sharing your thoughts. It helps when writers talk about their experiences. I think everyone gains from it.

    • Ann1Az2 profile image

      Ann1Az2 3 years ago from Orange, Texas

      Getting in touch with one's emotions - that's the hard part! But you're right. That's what makes a great writer. I always think of Edgar Allen Poe when I think of writers' emotions. He was a real nut case after losing his wife and mother-in-law and it came across well in his writings. Who else could have written the Pit and the Pendulum?

      I had to laugh when you were talking about figuring out the time one is most creative. If I had my way, I would stay up all night and sleep all day, but my activities will not allow me to do that. For instance, if I stayed up all night, I could not possible go volunteer at our school the next morning.

      And so, I have a challenge (which I love, by the way). I have actually kept a notebook by my bedside so that if I wake up during the night with an idea, I can jot it down, or if my head is spinning before I try to sleep, I can write things down. I've written a hub or two by starting with those humble beginnings.

      Thank you once again for your great suggestions, Bill!

    • Homeplace Series profile image

      William Leverne Smith 3 years ago from Hollister, MO

      I really struggle with using the senses - though I well know how important it is. Very well-stated reminder. THANKS for sharing! ;-)

    • JayeWisdom profile image

      Jaye Denman 3 years ago from Deep South, USA

      I've been re-reading some of my unfinished longer pieces (a novella, novel-in-progress and a play) with an eye toward how I could make them better. The latter needs a different approach altogether, but the first two definitely need more 'umph' than they currently possess. While they may not be mundane, they don't yet soar. That is my task--to give them wings. Thanks for the reminder. There's no point in writing if the end result isn't good enough to grab and hold a reader's attention.

      By the way, if you ever visit Cafe Du Monde, in New Orleans, you won't be disappointed, either in the coffee with chicory (for newbies, cafe au lait might be better than the straight black and very strong stuff), sugared beignets plus sights and sounds of the street people performing nearby. And...if you and Bev get as far south as New Orleans, you should come back through Jackson, Mississippi and visit me. (I keep coffee and chicory, too. Though I don't make beignets, I am a pretty good soul cook.)

      Voted Up+++

      Jaye

    • heidithorne profile image

      Heidi Thorne 3 years ago from Chicago Area

      Love that you asked "What are you trying to achieve?" I don't think a lot of fiction writers (or even some nonfiction types) even ask that question. I'm sure their answer to the question would be "to write a book." It's not the action that's the goal, it's the reaction from the reader. Great stuff, as always!

    • AudreyHowitt profile image

      Audrey Howitt 3 years ago from California

      I don't know how you can be so disciplined--sometimes I just can't even sit my body down to do it

    • cygnetbrown profile image

      Donna Brown 3 years ago from Alton, Missouri

      Another hit, Bill! I know that you have been talking a lot lately about how you have decided to focus more on writing your novels. My circumstances are leading me away from the novels (at least for now) toward nonfiction and gardening as you probably have guessed. I agree that when writing fiction (or nonfiction for that matter), your enthusiasm shines through to the reader. If you're not enthused, neither will the reader.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, I love that you keep a notebook handy. That is something every writer should do...and take that notebook everywhere. We never know when ideas will come to us.

      Thank you my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You are very welcome, Dr. Bill. Thanks for the visit,.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jaye, you can bet that if we ever make that trip, your home will be on the itinerary. Thank you for the kind offer. Keep the light on for us. :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you, Heidi. Quite truthfully, I think there are a great many unfocused writers in our community. I'm just trying to give a little nudge.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I don't know either, Audrey. I've been that way, really, since my teen years. :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Donna, I love that you have a direction. I suspect, from what I have seen on HP, that there are a great many writers who do not have one, and I think it shows in their writing. Thanks for being here.

    • always exploring profile image

      Ruby Jean Fuller 3 years ago from Southern Illinois

      I really do want to improve as a fiction writer and i have gone out of my comfort zone. Practice is the key. Thank you for helping us along the way.

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 3 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      Very good stuff. If I keeping working on it they will come.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ruby, you have improved immensely, since I have known you. Keep up the great work, and thank you.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      True words, Eric! Carry on my friend.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      You provide great inspiration here for us all to improve.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you, Flourish. I always appreciate your kind loyalty.

    • tobusiness profile image

      Jo Alexis-Hagues 3 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

      Every time I read one of your articles on becoming a better writer, I go back to the work I've done so far, and I can hear you saying, " Jo, you could do better." :) I'll be taking it all apart again later on. Thank you for the tips, the message is getting through.

      My best always.

    • Laura335 profile image

      Laura Smith 3 years ago from Pittsburgh, PA

      These are some really helpful points. I'll keep these in mind when editing my new book. I think it could benefit by mixing things up as you say.

    • Jenn-Anne profile image

      Jenn-Anne 3 years ago

      I always feel inspired after reading your hubs. I haven't written much recently but I want to get back into it again. Love all the practical, useful, important information!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jo, I would never say that to you. :) I'm glad you find these tips helpful, though.

      Blessings and thanks

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Laura, I'm glad you like these. Good luck with that new book.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jenn-Anne, it's good to see you again. I look forward to seeing your next work. Thank you!

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Oh, it's time to buy your book! You did it, congrats. Once you give birth to that first one : ) ...the next one may be a bit easier, and I am sure just as special no doubt.

      Stepping out of our comfort zone makes things fresh and exciting, just as our writing should be written!

      Blessings always

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 3 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Great advice, as always, Bill. I will remember it when I write my next story!

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Great tips and sounds very helpful indeed. Fiction writing is another genre with many thoughts.

    • lifegate profile image

      William Kovacic 3 years ago from Pleasant Gap, PA

      Good Morning Bill,

      Thanks for more great and practical ideas. I need to go back through the book I'm working on now and see how to best apply some of these things. Since you brought it up, how do you see the difference between a short story, novella, and a novel by word count or page count? Thanks again for your detailed instruction.

    • PegCole17 profile image

      Peg Cole 3 years ago from Dallas, Texas

      Another useful hub, Bill. I liked the Rick Riordan video about the 3 things (young) writers need to do and your useful tips on writing during our most productive time. My hubby knows to stay out of the way when I'm headed for a pencil to scribble down a thought. lol.

      I also liked what epbooks said about their book. "I wrote it in first person which was SO much fun, but SOOO difficult because the main character had to see all..." This is reassuring in a way. In the past I responded to some negative feedback by changing the story to third person. Probably won't do that again. Smiles.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Almost, Faith. Two more weeks and it will be published. Thank you my friend, and blessings always

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you so much, Alicia!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you DDE!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Good morning lifegate! I'm not sure I understand the question....short story usually 0-7500 words...novella up to 30,000 words...novel between 50,000-100,000 words....I hope that's what you were asking.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Peg, write your book your way. I have written in 1st person and I love it....in the end, you are the one who must be satisfied.

    • Engelta profile image

      Engelis 3 years ago from Albania

      I think I gotta take this tips and apply on my writing. Thanks

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you, Engelta, and I hope they help you.

    • lifegate profile image

      William Kovacic 3 years ago from Pleasant Gap, PA

      Thanks Bill, that's what I was asking.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Good deal, lifegate. :)

    • Genna East profile image

      Genna East 3 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

      “We all share five senses. We all experience the thrill of taste, sight, touch, smell and sound. Use those senses to get in touch with your emotions, and use your emotions to bond with the emotions of your readers.” This is excellent advice, Bill. It’s not always easy to follow as we sometimes forget. Excellent hub, as always. :-)

    • jo miller profile image

      jo miller 3 years ago from Tennessee

      My main goal as a writer is to be respected, especially by those whose writing I respect.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Genna, thank you and no, it is not always easy, but good writing should not be easy. I don't remember who said it, but to paraphrase, "great reading should be hard writing."

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Well, Jo, I think you are there. Keep up the good work.

    • vkwok profile image

      Victor W. Kwok 3 years ago from Hawaii

      Thanks for the epic advice Bill!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You betcha, vkwok...thank you!

    • Anna Haven profile image

      Anna Haven 3 years ago from Scotland

      As always you deliver. Helpful advice in a clear and enticing manner. :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Anna! You are a wonderful follower.

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      Ann Carr 3 years ago from SW England

      Your enthusiasm and your knowledge shine through this piece. Superb advice! We should always stretch for more, put ourselves at risk so that we and the reader feel the stress and the suspense and the doubt.

      Invaluable advice for each and every writer under the sun, bill. Ann

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, hopefully, not only under the sun, but under rainy skies as well. :) Thank you for your kind words. I do not understand a writer who is not willing to stretch and improve.

      Lazy day here and enjoying it greatly.

      bill

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      Graham Lee 3 years ago from Lancashire. England.

      Hi Bill. Although my interests are non-fiction, I found this hub helpful. I am also a morning person. Always the mentor Bill, well done as usual.

      Graham.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Graham, thank you my friend. Mornings are when it is happening for this writer. By noon you can stick a fork in me because I am done. :)

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 3 years ago

      The challenge is connecting your reader emotionally with the character. If one can do this than they have accomplished much in the world of writing. I will keep this excellent advice in mind.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I believe that to be true, Dianna, and I believe it is crucial when writing fiction of any kind. Thanks for your thoughts.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 3 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Well said. Sounds like good advice to me, and I want to be better than just good. I want to be GREAT.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Well then, Deb, I have no doubt that you will be. :) Thanks my friend.

    • Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

      Glimmer Twin Fan 2 years ago

      I always love that I can take your writing improvement hubs and tweak them to my kind of writing. I really do think more about what I am saying or appealing to when I write an intro to a craft or recipe. Thanks for another great article.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I'm glad to hear it, Glimmer. Thank you for those words of affirmation.

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      Pat 15 months ago

      Hi...how did you find your best time to write? I am disabled, so not always available to myself. I also care for a toddler grandson second shift ans a disabled 18yo who will forever be 10 or 11. And my husband is also disabled. I have tried early & late mornings, afternoons & evenings, late & middle of the night and nothing is a consistant time for me. This makes things so much more difficult...sigh.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 15 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Pat, whatever I would say is meaningless considering your situation. When is the best time to write for you? It sounds like whenever you can find a half hour. Best wishes to you!

    • Joyce Fischer profile image

      Joyce A Fischer 9 months ago from Thailand

      All of this makes a lot of sense to me. But what does not make sense is the HP requirement that all writing be "useful". Is writing short stories, novels, or even creative non-fiction always useful? Is Bill Bryson's "A Walk in the Woods" useful? Other than a few points about the Appalachian Trail and a warning not to try it if you are not in better shape than he was when he did it, it's mainly entertaining and funny.

      I like the first two chapters you've written for "The Sun Never Rises". I can see it has real social value. My story is a classic road trip with a twist. I think people who read short stories and novels will find it interesting, but I doubt it has any social value other than the fact that the things that go wrong are often the best fodder for writing. I could trump up a title like "How to Survive as a Woman on the Road" but that seems insincere. It's a good thing Jane Austen didn't have to meet HP criteria.

      I guess I am going to just find a topic that will fit the short story I've written and see if it's accepted. If I get good pointers, it will be worth it, but if it is rejected out of hand as not being useful, I will have to rethink HP. I hope you and some of your readers will take a look and comment.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 9 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Joyce, I always take a look at comments, and yours is one many people are a bit upset about. About three, maybe four years ago, HP made a corporate decision to steer their writers away from creativity and fiction and poetry. I don't blame them for doing it but I think they are wrong in doing so. That's why I'm testing another writing site out, and so far so good.

    • Joyce Fischer profile image

      Joyce A Fischer 9 months ago from Thailand

      Thanks. No need to post it, then. I've sent you a friend request on FB.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 9 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Got it, Joyce. Thank you!

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