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Use Setting To Influence Characters And Plot and Thereby Enrich Your Story or Novel

Updated on November 8, 2013

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Are you getting the most from your settings when you write a short story or novel? Confused by what I am asking?

I recently saw a movie titled “Gravity” with Sandra Bullock and George Clooney. It is about the trials and tribulations of two astronauts, and then one astronaut, during a space voyage. If you have seen that movie you will realize immediately how important the setting is to that movie. The setting is everything in that movie, and it most definitely influences everything the characters are doing and also drives the plot forward.

Another example?

“The Grapes of Wrath” by John Steinbeck. Read the first chapter and then contemplate how the setting of that windblown, desolate place affects the characters and the plot. I would go so far as to say that the setting in the first few chapters is the main character.

Here is what I have noticed after sixty years of reading: far too many writers ignore the importance of setting. They concentrate on the plot. They concentrate on the characters. They concentrate of pacing and rhythm, but often times they forget setting to the detriment of their story.

Consider that setting is where your readers are going to live for the life of your story. How can you make your reader feel welcome in your setting? If you can answer that question then you will have brought life to your story and thereby made it an enjoyable read.

What follows are questions I want you to ask yourself about the setting in your story or novel. By answering these questions you will unleash potential and make your story all that it can be.

A bleak but beautiful setting
A bleak but beautiful setting | Source
Characters are affected by the setting
Characters are affected by the setting | Source

WHAT IS THE PRINCIPLE SETTING OF YOUR STORY?

Is there one particular setting in your story that best reflects the story? Is it nature? A busy city? One room? How does that setting affect your characters? How does it affect the plot?

I am willing to bet that some of you out there cannot answer this question. I would bet that simply because I have some earlier short stories of mine that do not have a central setting, certainly not one that affects the characters in any way, shape or form. Guess I have some re-writing to do, don’t I?

COULD YOUR STORY HAVE HAPPENED IN A DIFFERENT SETTING?

This calls for some critical self-analysis on your part. If you have a story or novel, and you could easily shift it to a different setting, then setting is not terribly important to your story or novel.

Obviously, if you are writing historical fiction, your setting is limited to a particular time, and that time will dictate the “look” of your setting. However, if you are writing a story about modern times, what is it about your setting that makes it unique and important to the story?

But what, you say, if your story takes place in someone’s home? What is unique about a home? And I would say are you serious? What is unique about the home you live in right now? What are the sights, the sounds, the smells, the textures and the tastes of your home? The five senses often are a wonderful way of making a setting unique. Give it a try!

WHERE ARE YOUR CHARACTERS FROM?

And how do those places affect your characters? Someone brought up in the Bible Belt to strict Baptist parents will definitely be affected by living in that environment. Someone brought up in a small community in Alaska will be affected in a completely different manner.

Remember that we want our characters to seem real to our readers; the more depth you can give them the better, and where they were raised is a valid question when shaping your characters.

Would this setting affect tone?
Would this setting affect tone? | Source

This video might help you

HOW DO YOUR CHARACTERS RELATE TO THE SETTING?

Are your characters comfortable in their setting, or is the setting a struggle for them? What if your character lived in an abusive home? What if the environment is toxic? What if your character is lost in the wilderness?

Whether your setting is adversarial or comfortable, your characters are definitely affected by it, and this adds to the depth of your story if you capitalize on it.

CAN THE SETTING FUNCTION LIKE A CHARACTER?

Well of course it can. How about horror books where the story takes place in a haunted house? The house….the setting….is definitely one of the characters in the book. The Amityville Horror??? Hello???

Novels that take place in nature….Shipwrecked for instance….in cases like that, to ignore the setting would be to ignore a key element in the book.

DOES THE SETTING AFFECT THE TONE OF THE STORY?

Think about this question for a moment. Does the setting affect the tone? Well it can for certain.

One of my favorite mystery writers is James Lee Burke. All of his Dave Robicheaux books are set in the bayous of Louisiana, and you better believe the setting affects the mood.

Or let’s think of it another way: a murder mystery set in a peaceful Vermont village will have a different tone than a murder mystery set in Los Angeles.

Or would this setting affect tone differently?
Or would this setting affect tone differently? | Source

Short message


DOES YOUR SETTING RELATE WELL TO THE THEME?

I will refer you to “To Kill A Mockingbird” to illustrate this point. The story is located in a sleep Southern town during the Great Depression; a setting of struggle, pride, humanness and racial prejudice. There is an oppressive tone to the setting of that town, and there is an oppressive tone to the way people relate to each other. It is beautifully written from the vantage point of tone and setting.

IS YOUR SETTING UNIQUE?

Why bother writing a story or novel if there is not something unique about it? I have read stories where the author hurried through the descriptions like they were a bother to them, and what a shame that is.

Make your settings unique. Give them a personality. Give them life. Give them distinguishing features that make them come alive. Again, referring to “To Kill A Mockingbird,” I felt like I had lived in Maycomb by the time I finished reading about that sleepy, dusty down. That, my friends, is the reason why that book is a classic in literature.

Do You Now Have Enough to Think About?

And you thought writing was just a simple matter! Hahahahaha! It takes a lot of work my friends to write a QUALITY short story or novel. Writing a story does not require talent; writing a very good story does.

And where do you suppose writing talent comes from? Maybe, just maybe, some people are born with certain DNA that gives them an advantage in writing. I’m not convinced of that but I’m willing to entertain the possibility. Most good writers are good writers because they work to improve their craft, and that work includes paying attention to setting.

I have said it before and I’ll say it many times in the future: there are no shortcuts to becoming a good writer. One must work to improve. If that doesn’t interest you then have a great day and I wish you happiness.

If, however, you are interested in stretching your own personal limits, and if you are interested in finding out just how good you can be, then you need to do the little things that separate the very good writers from the mediocre.

And by doing those things, you will begin to spread your wings and fly.

2013 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

“Helping writers to spread their wings and fly.”

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    • Janine Huldie profile image

      Janine Huldie 3 years ago from New York, New York

      Always love when you share your insights on writing and love how you explained here also about how setting is so very important to the story you may be telling. Thanks Bill and have a great Friday now!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Janine, it is unbelievable how fast you are. Thank you my dear and enjoy your day.

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 3 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      Great hub, thank you. It reminds me of telling my stories to little children. They just love "settings".

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 3 years ago from SW England

      Such good advice on this essential part of a story; you put the arguments so well that the budding story-writer can't fail to say, 'Yep, that's what I have to do', and hey presto s/he's already on the way to a better story! Excellent! Enjoy your weekend! Ann

    • ocfireflies profile image

      ocfireflies 3 years ago from North Carolina

      Bill,

      I believe this one area that I need to really work on. Thanks for the great tips as usual.

      Kim

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      There you go, Eric1 I like that....love settings. :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you very much Ann! Just passing along what was freely given to me. Enjoy your weekend my friend; winter has arrived here and all is well. :)

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      My pleasure Kim; thank you for taking the time to read it; have a great weekend.

    • carol7777 profile image

      carol stanley 3 years ago from Arizona

      I know what you mean about setting, though I never thought of it exactly in these words. The characters in another setting--no meaning. I will be thinking of this the next time I start a new book.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Awesome, helpful hub that prompts me to dwell on these with care. I have started writing that novel I have long merely considered. Thank you for this!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Flourish, I am so happy that you started your novel. Well done my friend and best wishes on it. Thank you and have a great weekend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Carol, I'm glad you found this helpful. Let me know when the new book is finished. I'll want to buy it of course.

    • cam8510 profile image

      Chris Mills 3 years ago from St. Louis, MO until the end of June, 2017

      Thanks Bill. I will be looking at my flash fiction more critically in this regard. It is another way to enrich a story as short as mine can be at times. I'll take all the help I can get. Thanks again.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Cam, I would think in flash fiction this would be quite hard. I'm sure it's doable but much harder than in a novel or even a regular length short story. Good luck and thank you!

    • JayeWisdom profile image

      Jaye Denman 3 years ago from Deep South, USA

      Will comment later. Gashed hand/4 stitches. Terrible when writer can't type!

      Great hub. Up++ Jaye

    • cygnetbrown profile image

      Donna Brown 3 years ago from Alton, Missouri

      Writing simple? NEVER! But then that's why I do it!

    • Nellieanna profile image

      Nellieanna Hay 3 years ago from TEXAS

      How valuable, Billy! Yes, setting is to a story what setting is in real life: - its basis, its shape, as the container is to a cup of water. Even if a story had little else but setting, it would have a connection with the readers, which could almost supply other details!

      OH Jaye! I'm so sorry! Yes, a writer's hand injuries are almost too limiting and devastating, unless composing on audio-tape! Sheesh! Do take care of the body! ;-)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Oh goodness, Jaye; take care my friend and thank you for making the effort to write as much as you did.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      cygnetbrown, love the challenge, eh? So do I my friend; so do I! Thank you for the smile you gave me.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Nellieanna! Some of my favorite writers are masters of setting.

      As for Jaye...I would be in big trouble if I hurt my hands. Note to self: be careful. :)

    • MarleneB profile image

      Marlene Bertrand 3 years ago from Northern California, USA

      I never thought about the setting functioning like a character, but now that you mention it... that makes perfect sense. Oh yes! Now, I can see how making the scene come alive can really enhance the story line. This little tip has helped a lot.

    • tobusiness profile image

      Jo Alexis-Hagues 3 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

      I'm currently writing something where the setting is in fact the most important character, certainly in the first few paragraphs, so this is very timely for me. A very useful article, I'll be returning later to read in detail. My best as always.

    • sweethearts2 profile image

      sweethearts2 3 years ago from Northwest Indiana

      You do give the wind to soar and I am encouraged to take flight. Your encouragement and advice is so uplifting and supportive as I strive to share my stories. Another great hub -

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 3 years ago from Central Florida

      I am so frazzled. I left a very lengthy comment and now it's not here. I'll have to come back when I'm not so frustrated. It would have been nice if HP notified me of your post (as they usually do) before sending out the daily report. Is it HP or is it my computer? I don't know, but I will post my comment tomorrow. Hopefully, I have it memorized!

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Isaac Weithers 3 years ago from The Caribbean

      You show clearly how important setting is to the story. Our minds have to be fully engaged to bring it all together appropriately. Thanks for another important lesson.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Marlene, I love it when the light bulb turns on above our heads. :) Something we see in almost every book we read but don't realize it. Well now you do. :) Thanks and have a great weekend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jo, I love it...thank you for sharing that observation. I hope you have a wonderful weekend my friend. Blessings always.

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      sweethearts, that is music to my ears. Best wishes on your stories and I look forward to seeing you soar higher and higher. Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sha, I hate it when that happens. I've had it happen several times and it has actually forced me to write shorter comments because of it. Hang in there dear friend and enjoy your weekend...and thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Dora, I guess if I had one message for writers before they attempt a novel it would be that it is not easy. There is a great deal of work and thought that goes into 100,000 words that form an interesting story. Thanks for the visit and blessings to you always.

    • Mel Carriere profile image

      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      I think the best books start out with the setting as the basic premise. Steinbeck, as you say, was a master at this, not only with The Grapes of Wrath but also East of Eden and my personal favorite Cannery Row. Steinbeck's settings are usually malignant and oppressive, and indeed are sometimes the chief antagonists in his tales. Great hub!

    • bdegiulio profile image

      Bill De Giulio 3 years ago from Massachusetts

      Very interesting Bill. You got me to thinking if this is not something I should be thinking more about when writing travel hubs? I think the setting is very important to any travel article. Certainly a well placed photo that sets the scene would be a must. Thanks as always for the great tips. Have a great weekend.

    • kidscrafts profile image

      kidscrafts 3 years ago from Ottawa, Canada

      You are right that the setting is very important in a book. It happened that I read some books and I feel lost for a while because there is no setting. Other writers start by the settings and it's easier to follow the characters and the story.

      By the way... I saw the movie "Gravity" and indeed, you can't miss the setting! I loved that movie :-)

      Have a great weekend!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mel, great points. I had forgotten about Cannery Row but that is a great example. Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Bill, I think that might be the angle to take to set your articles apart from other travel articles....yes, give that some thought buddy.

      Have a great weekend and thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Joelle, I loved that movie too and I didn't think I would; great job using the setting as a character. Thanks for your thoughts on this and have a great weekend.

    • tillsontitan profile image

      Mary Craig 3 years ago from New York

      I have to admit I never thought about how important setting is though I've read so many books where it is an important part. Imagine "The Shining" in a beach house!

      You have given us much to think about. I like the idea of thinking of the setting as a character, giving it the importance it deserves.

      Voted up, useful, awesome, interesting, pinned, and shared.

    • wayne barrett profile image

      Wayne Barrett 3 years ago from Clearwater Florida

      You make a very good point right off the bat, Bill; the setting is one of the characters. It needs the same attention, if not more, than many of those on your character sheets.

      Very well written piece.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Mary! The Shining is a perfect example. I hope you are able to use these ideas. Have a great weekend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Wayne! Coming from a wordsmith such as yourself that is high praise.

    • Kathryn Stratford profile image

      Kathryn 3 years ago from Manchester, Connecticut

      The setting is one of my favorite parts of a story!

      Thanks for sharing this with us, and I hope you have a great weekend.

      ~ Kathryn

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Kathryn; I hope yours is wonderful as well.

    • Mhatter99 profile image

      Martin Kloess 3 years ago from San Francisco

      Thank you for sharing your expertise.

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Use Setting To Influence Characters And Plot and Thereby Enrich Your Story or Novel great suggestions here. A well written and shared Hub, with helpful ways to a setting of plot. You always share such informative hubs.

    • Genna East profile image

      Genna East 3 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

      The setting does indeed breathe life into the story. It helps us visualize the characters in the sense that we are pulled into the existence and “being” of their situation through imagination. Without it, the characters become voices in a vacuum. Well done, Billy. :-)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      My pleasure, Martin! Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you so much DDE.....I am just happy that people find these useful.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Genna! I love your new profile picture. :) Have a great weekend.

    • Jackie Lynnley profile image

      Jackie Lynnley 3 years ago from The Beautiful South

      Oh, I just love settings and you know some ppl do not which is crazy, but then I have read some that are not too good or just ramble on, and when the author has to look into the mirror to let you know how beautiful she is (which is kinda getting off the subject)...just throw that one out the window! Another great one billy and I didn't even think about the government. lol! Up and sharing as always!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jackie, I love it....I have read some horrible settings that left me wondering how the author ever got published...then there are some settings where I felt I was right there in the scene. Makes all the difference in the world. Thanks and have a great weekend.

    • grandmapearl profile image

      Connie Smith 3 years ago from Southern Tier New York State

      Billy, sorry I haven't been around lately--lots of outdoor chores and too little time!

      I love the idea of the setting being a character in a story; never thought of it that way, but I see it so very clearly now. Thanks for bringing this out, my friend ;) Pearl

      Voted Up++ and added to the bookmark that bears your name!

    • JayeWisdom profile image

      Jaye Denman 3 years ago from Deep South, USA

      I'm back and typing with my fingers peeking out of the bandage, though slowly. I always think I'm being careful, but they don't call me "Superklutz" for nothing!

      This hub provided a lot of food for thought. Even without re-reading them, I think my short stories lack strong settings. Particularly when writing flash fiction, the limiting word count hampers description. Those of us who write the short-shorts should consider it another challenge to evoke place thoroughly in only a few words.

      Voted Up++

      Jaye

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 3 years ago from Central Florida

      Ok, I'm going to try this again. I know I won't capture everything I said in the comment that got dumped, but here goes:

      First, I'd like to state that picture prompts inspire me. Building a story around a setting is not only challenging, but sets the characters around the setting rather than vice versa. Additionally, it ensures you create an image which can make your characters seem like real people.

      Another thing I wanted to mention is a conversation that came up the other day at my luncheon with friends. One of the attendees is an artist and began a greeting card business a few years ago. (She's about your age or maybe a few years older, Bill). She hand paints the cards using water colors. They're whimsical and she says she never knows which character will reveal itself until she's finished.

      Anyway, as she was showing us some of her latest designs, our waitress commented that she doesn't have an artistic bone in her body. My friend Linda, the artist, came back with this reply: "Everyone is artistic is one way or another. Children are born with the ability to draw, write, recite or play music. It's when their parents don't encourage their talents or put them down, that the ability falls to the wayside, much like dead skin."

      I thought this was so profound. Linda's parents were artists, so naturally encouraged her talent. My parents have always encouraged our talents. My brother is an artist, I'm a writer and my sister plays piano (so did I once a upon a time ago, but haven't in a hundred years!).

      I know this is a little off point, but I thought Linda's comment was so profound I felt it important to share with those who may doubt their talents.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Connie, no reason to apologize. With winter heading our way it's important to get those chores done. Thanks for taking the time to check me out; have a great weekend my friend.

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jaye, I would think that writing flash fiction would severely limit the writing of settings. That would for sure be a major challenge. :)

      Good luck with that finger...or fingers....and thank you!

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Well, Sha, for sure I do not have artistic talents with regards to drawing and painting...or should I say they were never cultivated. Whatever, I can't draw stick figures. LOL

      But art is so much more than just painting. I was encouraged to read and read often, and in my teens I was encouraged to write....so my writing abilities obviously come from that encouragement and whatever talent God decided to bestow on me. :)

      great points my friend; thank you!

    • vkwok profile image

      Victor W. Kwok 3 years ago from Hawaii

      Thanks for the amazing advice!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      It's always my pleasure, vkwok! Thank you for always being here.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Billy, such a very interesting topic. This is really helpful. I know I will refer back here in future writings.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Brandi; it's always nice to know readers find my stuff interesting. :) Have a great Sunday!

    • drbj profile image

      drbj and sherry 3 years ago from south Florida

      You chose the perfect film, Bill, to illustrate your exceptional thoughts about settings - Gravity! The settings are the co-stars.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you drbj; that film was extraordinary in its direction and writing....thank God they made it so I could mention it here. LOL

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 3 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      This hub is very useful for writers, Bill, like so many of your hubs. I love stories that describe the setting effectively! In fact, most of my favorite stories use setting as a character.

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Great article Bill! Yes, the setting plays a huge role when writing for sure. Thank you for giving us much to think on once again in your useful and informative hubs, as always. I just love your photographs and I am thrilled you are getting to use your camera, and we are enjoying the benefits of such beautiful photos.

      I see I have some catching up to do since my computer has been down and still have having glitches this day.

      Up and more and sharing

      Blessings, Faith Reaper

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Alicia, I think you speak for most readers. A good writer places the reader right in the setting. Thank you for sharing your thoughts.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Faith, thank you so much as always. I can't imagine what my week would look like without my computer. I hope I don't have to find out.

      blessings always my friend

      bill

    • Pamela99 profile image

      Pamela Oglesby 3 years ago from United States

      You make such a good point about the setting of stories and I think your examples illustrated your points perfectly. This hyb is going to force me to go back and take a better look at the book I am writing. While I used details of specific locations, I'm not sure I did enough. Thanks for enlightening me.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Pamela, you are very welcome. I usually don't do much with settings until I've finished my first draft of a book. My second draft is for settings and more intensive character descriptions. You still have time. :)

    • Eiddwen profile image

      Eiddwen 3 years ago from Wales

      Another wonderful hub from you Billy. Here's to so many more to come. Enjoy your day.

      Eddy.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Eddy, I am lifting a toast your way for many years to come. Thank you my dear.

      love,

      billy

    • hawaiianodysseus profile image

      Hawaiian Odysseus 3 years ago from Southeast Washington state

      Hi, Bill!

      I love your consideration of setting as being another character, sometimes even the main character, in a story or novel. The brilliant writer that comes to mind as I read your excellent tutorial here is James Michener. Every novel he wrote depended upon his readers grasping the extent and enormity of setting...and he always delivered masterfully, sometimes spending an entire chapter or more just developing and embedding the setting in his own and, subsequently, his reader's minds.

      I've seen you plant those similar scenes that then embellish the rest of your essays...like a master carpenter, you build solid foundations for your literary homes.

      Thank you, Bill, for lessons both by word and example. I'm honored to read your writing and call you Friend. Aloha, and have a productive and loving Tuesday!

      ~Joe

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Joe, what a wonderful example and one I should have thought of. I think of his novels and the setting was most definitely an active character in the book....thank you for that, and thank you for visiting me on this rainy Tuesday morn.

      blessings always my friend

      Aloha

      bill

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 3 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      A few days ago, I told a manager that there are good and great managers and I gave my version of great, and why I thought so. A great manager has VISION and can act upon it. Sadly, most of them have the lack of communication skills, which they must learn in order to make the business GREAT. Same scenario for everything. It isn't hard to MANAGE, but it is hard to do it in a meaningful way.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Deb, nice metaphor, and I'm a huge fan of metaphors. :) Well done my friend and thanks for sharing your thoughts.

    • FictionFish profile image

      Kurt Frazier Sr 2 years ago from Mobile Al

      I found that there are some stories that I have written that the setting is on the back burner and I believe that by focusing on the setting will greatly improve the quality and ease of the flow of the story. Many thanks for the encouragement to continue to learn to improve my writing.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I believe that too, FictionFish. Good luck from here on. I'm sure those settings will shine eventually.

    • freedomfight profile image

      Christian Mike Simmons 2 years ago from Durham, NC

      You are right. Setting can have a real effect on characters. I may have to adjust my work.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you freedomfight....I appreciate you stopping by.

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