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Weston Wagons West - Ep. J20 - The Fourth Decade of the Kinnick family in Bureau County, Illinois

Updated on December 23, 2014
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Dr. Bill's first passion is family history. His second is a passion for creating family saga, historical fiction stories that share it.

Harry was the first person buried in Utica Cemetery

Gravestone of young Harry Lyon in Kansas
Gravestone of young Harry Lyon in Kansas | Source

The Kinnick extended families continues to grow, as did the Fletchers and the Westons

Everett and Hannah Weston had daughter, Allison, born in April of 1875. In 1877, Susan Kinnick affiliated with the United Brethern Church. Fanny Alice Kinnick was born to Walter and Mary in Buda, in March of 1878. Another son, their sixth, was born to John and Catharine Fletcher, Frank William, in early December of 1878. In December of 1879, Fanny Susan, Susan Kinnick's youngest daughter, married William Eugene (he went by Gene) Lyon. The Lyons moved to Ness county, Kansas, in 1882, and located on a homestead south of Utica, where they lived the rest of their lives. Their only son, Harry, was born in March of 1887. He only lived for seven years, six months and ten days. He died 15 Sep 1894. He was the first person to be buried in the Utica Cemetery. In April of 1880, Susan's other grand-daughter living with her, Mary A. Harrison, became ill, and died.

While her children, and two wards, were now all gone, Susan was not alone. She was living with her son, Jacob, and his wife, Fannie. Also resident in the household in June 1880, when the census taker stopped by, were Fannie's mother, Susan Fletcher, age 82, and a 16-year-old niece of Jacob, Lovina Weeden, going to school. Susan Kinnick was listed as age 71, Jacob, age 34, and Fannie, age 40. Later in 1880, in November, Walter and Mary Kinnick had a son, John. He only lived a few days past his first birthday. John and Catherine Fletcher became parents of their fourth daughter, Nellie E. Fletcher, in December of 1880, bringing their total number of children in the home to ten.

Maggie and Jacob Weise gave Susan another grandson, Roy Weise, in August of 1881. In May of 1883, John and Catherine Fletcher also provided another grandson, Clark Eugene Fletcher. Susan (Schwyhart) Kinnick passes away on 27 Sep 1884, at 75 years, 4 months, and 25 days. She was buried beside her husband, Walter W., at Forest Hill Cemetery, in Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois. She was survived by three sons (Joseph, Walter, and Jacob) and four daughters (Sarah Ann, Catharine, Maggie, and Fanny), and numerous grandchildren.

The Weston family continued to raise horses

Two mares and a foal
Two mares and a foal | Source

The original novel in "The Homeplace Saga" series of family saga historical fiction stories

Susan was buried beside her husband, Walter

Gravestone of Susan Kinnick
Gravestone of Susan Kinnick | Source

Life goes on for the surviving Kinnick-related families as well as the Westons

Jasper Weston reached 58 years of age in 1884, with two sons still affiliated with his business: Everett, age 35 and Marcus, age 33. Among them, they knew that Marcus would continue the practice that Jasper had begun and grown in Bureau County. They also agreed, that when the right opportunity came along, Everett, and his son, Sherman, now age 12, would be setting out on their own. They continued to work together well, to serve their customers, and raise their horses, but they also could feel a split approaching.

Over the winter of 1886-87, John Fletcher began to plan a move to Crawfordsville, in Washington County, in southeastern Iowa. He learned of desirable land that was available, and decided to make the move, with his wife and eleven children. However, a part of their decision to move was to leave 13-year-old son, Ora Layton Fletcher, to live and work with his uncle, Jacob Kinnick. This ended up being an excellent decision as Ora flourished in this farming and personal opportunity.

This was also the opportunity that Everett Weston and his family sought, as well. As was the case when Joseph Kinnick moved, they ended up with a wagon train of six wagons and four families who made the move together in the Spring of 1887. It was learned later, that the Fletchers had one more daughter born in December of 1887, at their new farm, near Crawfordsville. They named her Grace A. Fletcher.

They were buried at Forest Hill Cemetery, Wyanet, Illinois

Cemetery front entrance sign
Cemetery front entrance sign | Source

The latest book in "The Homeplace Saga" series of stories

Three Generations of Kinnick Men

Paul Harold KINNICK (1892-1968) Alonzo Palmer KINNICK (1870-1923) Walter Watson KINNICK (1840-1919) Civil War Veteran
Paul Harold KINNICK (1892-1968) Alonzo Palmer KINNICK (1870-1923) Walter Watson KINNICK (1840-1919) Civil War Veteran | Source

Walter and Mary Kinnick had two more children, then started to have marriages

Walter and Mary Kinnick had two more daughters in the years shortly after their grandmother had died. Mary Etta (they called her Etta) was born in May of 1885, and Gracie Irene was born in October of 1887. In the spring of 1888, their son, Alonzo, had completed high school and went on a trip to Adair County, Iowa, with his maternal uncle, Alfred O. Van Aken (married to his mother's sister, Rachel Simmons). Neither of them returned to Illinois.

The first family wedding was in January 1891, when Maggie married Lee Brewer. They continued to make their home in Buda. They had no children. In January of 1894, Emma married Will Carper. They also continued to live in Buda, as well. They had no children. In June of 1895, Katie married Levi Hamrick, in Buda. Joseph Erastus lived until 1925, never married, and had no children. George Walter lived until 1942, never married, and had no children.

Daughter, Fanny Alice, in May of 1894, at age 16, became ill, and died in the family home in Buda. Ira, Etta and Gracie each eventually married, but after the turn of the century.

In Iowa, Alonzo Palmer Kinnick met the daughter of a stone mason in Coon Rapids, Carroll County, Margaret Jeanette Williams (they called her Nettie). They were married in July of 1891, in her parents' home in Coon Rapids. They farmed near Coon Rapids, less than 25 miles from the place of his birth. Their first son, Paul Harold Kinnick, was born there in August of 1892. A daughter, Helen Lucile, followed in March of 1894, and a son, Robert Haydn, in March of 1896. After the turn of the century, Mary Gertrude was born in October of 1902 and Lillian Roberta was born in May of 1908, to complete the family of five children. (Paul Harold Kinnick is the grandfather of the author.) Back in Buda, the mother (and grandmother), Mary (Simmons) KInnick died in the home of Will Carper, her son-in-law, in Buda, in January of 1909. Walter Watson Kinnick lived until March of 1919. He had continued to live in Buda.

Raising horses was a year-around program

Horses running in the snow
Horses running in the snow | Source

The latest novel in "The Homeplace Saga" series of family saga historical fiction stories

Christmas Book Video Trailer

Historical notes by the author

All members of the Weston family are fictional, of course. Each Kinnick, Fletcher, Richmond, Harrison, Lyon, Simmons, Brewer, Hamrick, Van Aken, Williams, Carper, Schwyhart, Weise, and Hornsby and were historical figures, but were used here fictitiously. The relationship between the Kinnick and Weston families therefore were created fictionally for this story. These families (and the families related by marriage) were historical, but the details of their birth dates and early lives are filled in fictionally. They each played key roles in the life of Walter Watson Kinnick, a 2nd great-grandfather of the author, Alonzo Palmer Kinnick, his great-grandfather, and Paul Harold Kinnick, his grandfather. Each of the relationships within which these historical figures appear in these episodes is totally consistent with known historical facts for each such person in the official records of the State of Iowa and Illinois.


Also relied on was continuing family history research as this is a direct line ancestry of the author, of course.

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    • DrBill-WmL-Smith profile image
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      William Leverne Smith 3 years ago from Hollister, MO

      For sure. Thanks for the visit!

    • midget38 profile image

      Michelle Liew 3 years ago from Singapore

      Whoa..the genealogy of this family is rich! So much to share!

    • DrBill-WmL-Smith profile image
      Author

      William Leverne Smith 3 years ago from Hollister, MO

      Thank you, Mel. I agree, studying the migrations patterns is very fascinating, and fun! ;-)

    • DrBill-WmL-Smith profile image
      Author

      William Leverne Smith 3 years ago from Hollister, MO

      Thank you, Frank. It was a labor of love, for sure. Thanks for your comment and your visit! ;-)

    • Mel Carriere profile image

      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      You have done a remarkable job researching these hubs. The migrations of these families shows how we are all interconnected.

    • Frank Atanacio profile image

      Frank Atanacio 3 years ago from Shelton

      what i like about this piece is the time you had to put in to make it so true to form.. a wonder right my friend

    • DrBill-WmL-Smith profile image
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      William Leverne Smith 3 years ago from Hollister, MO

      Sorry, MsDora. Susan had a good life. She lived from very frontier style living to a fairly comfortable later life. It is so enjoyable, for me, to share their experiences. Your comments will help me do better in telling some of the future stories to come. Thank you! ;-)

    • DrBill-WmL-Smith profile image
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      William Leverne Smith 3 years ago from Hollister, MO

      Thank you, midget38, you are most kind. I truly enjoy history, and believe it can inform us as well as entertain us. I really enjoy your visits.

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Isaac Weithers 3 years ago from The Caribbean

      So my Susan is gone! Thanks for showing her tombstone so I can believe it really happened. With all the new marriages and births, there'll be others to love.

    • midget38 profile image

      Michelle Liew 3 years ago from Singapore

      You have a true knack for history, Bill. These families have a lot of it to share, and I am helping them along!

    • DrBill-WmL-Smith profile image
      Author

      William Leverne Smith 3 years ago from Hollister, MO

      Hope your dinner went well! Thanks for another visit. Also time for me to move onto another story line for a while. ;-)

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      My last official act of the day. It's dinner time now, but I wanted to make sure I didn't miss an installment. Now my mind is fed and it's time to take care of the stomach. :)