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When the Corn Died: Chapter Two

Updated on February 19, 2016

Thanks for Returning

I was very gratified with the initial comments about this new series. I’m an old history teacher. Combine that with some family history of farming during the Great Depression and, well, it was only natural that I write this series of short stories.

Let’s see what’s happening on the Harper farm this week.

SADNESS RISES WITH THE SUN

Nature seemed to be unaware of my heart’s heaviness, starting off the day with clear skies and a chorus of birds singing natural harmony with perfect pitch.

I didn’t sleep much last night. From the sounds of her breathing, I’m guessing Evelyn spent most of the night lost in thoughts, as I did. We didn’t talk. From time to time her arm would drape over my chest and hold me tight, desperately seeking strength and comfort while knowing there was none.

Our boy was leaving home.

Pete Junior had it in his head to ride the rails down to Missouri. He said there was mining work down there, and he felt a responsibility to the family to make money if possible and send us some. I had to respect him for it, all the while wanting to horsewhip some sense into him. It’s a tough damn world out there, and him only eighteen and never experienced none of it. Hell of a time for him to feel the need to spread his wings.

I kissed Evelyn on the forehead, got dressed and went out to feed the animals. Pete Junior was already outside starting the morning chores when I got there.

“Morning Pa,” he said, and he smiled and it damned near broke my heart.

“Morning Junior. You don’t have to do it, you know. We’ll find a way to make it work here. The Harper family has always hung tough when times got shaky, and by God we’ll do it again.”

He didn’t say anything else, just finished feeding the hogs, wiped off his hands and gave me a hug.

“It’s time for me to go, Pa. I’m meeting Lucas at the church and we’ll hop the nine-thirty freight train as it slows going through town.”

I smiled a smile that had nothing behind it.

“Go kiss your Ma, and you better by God keep in touch regular, you hear? I love you, son.”

“Love you too, Pa.”

Junior takes a new path
Junior takes a new path | Source

GOODBYE

We watched him walk away, Evelyn and me. We watched until he was just a dot in the distance, and then not even that, and then she and I stood under the old oak and hugged and cried for awhile. It just seemed like the thing to do. Finally it was Evelyn, naturally, who showed the strength necessary to move on with life.

“Peter Harper, enough of this foolishness now. You’ve got corn to tend to and me, I’m gathering up some raspberry pies I made and I’m taking them into town to sell. Delores at the Busy Bee Café said she’d take them off my hands for three cents each, and every penny helps. I’ll take the Ford if you don’t need it. Should only be gone an hour at most. Oh, I’m going to stop and see Father Ryan at St. Mary’s. He wants me to organize a church bazaar and I said I’d be happy to do so.”

She kissed me good and I was reminded once again just how damned lucky I was to land her. She was forty-two going on thirty and could still curl my toes.

There ain’t no time on a farm to lick wounds, physical or emotional. I had to trust in the Lord that Pete Junior was going to be all right. Put it in the hands of God. That’s what Father Ryan is always telling us, easier said than done, for sure, but still, good words to consider. We do what we can and hope it’s enough. At least the corn was looking good and healthy.

I broke at noon and had lunch with Evelyn. As always, she had the latest news from town.

“Bob from the feed store was in the café when I got there,” she told me. “He says there’s a new government program dealing with farming. Something like the Agriculture Adjustment Agency or some such thing. It’s supposed to help with stabilizing prices. He said rumor has it millions of pigs are going to be slaughtered to help get prices up again. I didn’t quite understand it all. And there’s also some new agency that will be dealing with soil erosion, hopefully it will end the giant dust clouds they’re having down south. Oh, and there was some big shakeup with banks. Seems they are going to separate commercial and investment banks so ordinary people don’t get hurt when those white-shirted blowhards get in too deep.”

“Well, I reckon that’s all well and good,” I told her. “I’m not sure how it all will shake out or help us, but the government sure as hell has to do something.”

Love they neighbor
Love they neighbor | Source

New Problems

We finished lunch, but the conversation had just circled around to what Evelyn wanted to talk about.

“I also saw Father Ryan, like I told you I was going to do. He said Emma Jameson and her small boy are in a bad way. Remember, her husband died back about Christmastime? I guess they are barely hanging on and Father asked me if there’s anything we can do to help. Now I’m talking to you.”

She finished picking up the dishes and turned to me, her eyes intense.

“I was thinking. We’ve got a spare bedroom. Why don’t we ask that young woman if she and her son would like to move in with us until they get on their feet? We could use the help around here, and I’m sure she would appreciate a neighborly hand.”

“Evelyn, for the love of God, we’re barely able to put food on the table for us. How in the heavens are we going to support two more people?”

She put down the dish towel and fixed me with a stare.

“Peter Harper, you listen and you listen good. We have an obligation to help others. You’re a good man, and I know you’re worried, but neighbors help neighbors. It’s as simple as that. If this country is going to recover from this fix we’re all in, it’s going to be because people reached out and helped each other. Now I want to do this, Peter, and I know in your heart you want to do it too.”

What’s a man to say when faced with the truth?

The family expands
The family expands

The Next Day

At eight in the morning, Evelyn took the car back into town. Forty-five minutes later she pulled into the driveway and shut off the engine. A cloud of dust spread over the front yard and the chickens scattered in search of less hectic surroundings.

Evelyn stepped out of the Ford, waved and smiled at me. From the passenger side came Emma Jameson and she was holding hands with a toe-headed little whippersnapper of a boy with ragged jeans and too-small checkered shirt. They had one suitcase between them.

Emma was a fair-skinned wisp of a woman, couldn’t be much taller than five feet, with delicate features and long chestnut-brown hair. I’d seen her at church, knew her well enough to say hello to, so I knew she was only twenty-two. Her son was, if memory served me, three or four. She and her husband had been working fifty acres south of town, struggling like the rest of us, when two days before Christmas a cow of theirs had kicked her husband. The kick splintered a rib, a bone punctured his heart and he was dead five minutes later. Since then it had been a real struggle for them, her with no family in the area, living mostly off the kindness of Father Ryan and the local church ladies’ group.

Evelyn led our guests over to me. Emma kept her eyes to the ground, but her son, what the hell was his name, was smiling at me and pullin’ on his ma’s arm to hurry.

“Peter,” Evelyn said. “You remember Emma and her son Timothy.”

I wiped my hands on my jeans.

“I surely do, Evelyn. Emma, it’s surely nice to have you staying with us. This is a big farm and we could use an extra hand to help out. And Timothy?” I reached out and shook his tiny hand. “I need another man to help me with the chickens. Do you think you could help an old man around here?”

The boy’s smile only got bigger as he nodded his head up and down and grinned that damn grin. Emma didn’t say a word, being as she was too busy crying.

“I’m going to take them into the house, Peter,” my wife told me. She favored me with a smile that said I done good. “I’ll show them their room so they can get settled in. Why don’t we all sit down for lunch in a couple hours and we can talk about this new extended family of ours?”

Now I Lay Me down to Sleep

Evelyn and I went to bed at nine, as is our norm. Sunrise comes early in June and the critters don’t much care if their handlers are sleepy, so nine it is at night and four-thirty it is in the morning.

I watched my wife undress and felt the familiar stirrings. The calendar may say I’m aging, but around Evelyn I’m still a young buck. She slid in next to me, draped her arm across my stomach and rested her head on my chest.

“It’s the right thing to do, Peter, and everything will be all right.”

“Yes it is, hon, and yes it will be. You were right again.”

“It’s getting to be a habit, me being right.”

And then she laughed, and her laugh told me what she said was true. We were going to make it, by God. It wasn’t going to be easy, but we’d make it. Our family was now minus one member and plus two more, and even if I didn’t understand it all, it was what it was and it felt right. There was love in this old house, and that love would plug the gaps between boards and keep out the cold winds when they came.

“You make me a better man, Evelyn. I love you.”

“I love you too, Peter.”

See You Next Week

And yes, I love all of you. Thanks for joining my relatives from the past. I hope you’re able to enjoy the story despite its lack of violence and action. I suspect, from your earlier comments, you are.

I’ll be back next week with another installment of “When the Corn Died.”

2016 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

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    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 16 months ago from Olympia, WA

      We're talking about very large hearts, Flourish. Never fear!

      Thank you my friend.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 16 months ago from USA

      Their generosity at bringing in those neighbors is large. Hope it doesn't stretch them too far.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 17 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Maria! I thought I would try writing something that was, if not completely, at least almost devoid of violence. I'm so glad you enjoy this.

      love,

      bill

    • marcoujor profile image

      Maria Jordan 17 months ago from Jeffersonville PA

      This is where I started two months ago...LOL, my mind - it works for me!

      I love the thought of a heartwarming story with family values that I'm comfortable with - including no violence... and I love Evelyn's big heart.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 17 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Well, Eddy, until your flow returns, I'll be there cranking out stories. Thank you so much.

    • Eiddwen profile image

      Eiddwen 17 months ago from Wales

      Loved this second chapter and can't wait to follow the lives of these people,especially to see how Emma and Timothy settle in. I wanted to settle to write a work of fiction of my own but nothing was flowing so I think I will carry on reading this for the time being as this is where my gut instinct is leading me for some reason and I know better than to argue with such a force ha!! Wonderful story here I come chapter three

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 18 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks again, Shanmarie! Have a great weekend.

    • shanmarie profile image

      shanmarie 18 months ago

      Yes indeed. I'm not necessarily a big fan of action and gore anyhow. LOL Then again, I like most any genre. Good writing does stand alone, you're right.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 18 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Not at all, Shanmarie....good storytelling can stand alone as I've learned from some excellent writers before me.

    • shanmarie profile image

      shanmarie 18 months ago

      Not necessarily a need for violence or exaggerated action to tell a good story. This is realistic and heart-touching.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 18 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Hi Sha! Actually no! I really didn't know my grandparents that well. The last time I saw them I was nine years old. No, this is just a compilation of characteristics I've seen from other farmers I've known and of course, the stories of the Great Depression come from my parents.

      I hope you are well. It's always good to hear from you.

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 18 months ago from Central Florida

      Evelyn is a strong, caring woman. She's a good influence on Peter and I'm sure she will be for Emma and Timothy, as well.

      I know your family is from Iowa, Bill, and you mentioned your relatives in the closing paragraphs. Are Peter and Evelyn modeled after your grandparents?

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 18 months ago from Olympia, WA

      I will for sure, Larry, as long as you readers enjoy it. Thank you!

    • Larry Rankin profile image

      Larry Rankin 18 months ago from Oklahoma

      Very compelling so far. Keep it up.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 18 months ago from Olympia, WA

      They really are, Lawrence. A writer can't go wrong writing about either of those two topics. :) Thank you sir!

      bill

    • lawrence01 profile image

      Lawrence Hebb 18 months ago from Hamilton, New Zealand

      Bill

      This story reminds me of the Movie 'Interstellar' as that movie starts on a farm with the corn being the only crop that hasn't died!

      This story and that movie are about one thing that is special, they're about family working together!

      Teamwork and families working together are great uplifting stories.

      Awesome

      Lawrence

      Just reading the comments my mum (who's 79) used to tell us when she was a child you never locked your door as your neigbours were always round your house and everyone pulled together! Somewhere we lost that!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 18 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Zulma, you are never late for my parties and I really do appreciate you finding the time to visit and comment...sincerely, thank you!

    • phoenix2327 profile image

      Zulma Burgos-Dudgeon 18 months ago from United Kingdom

      Sorry to be late to the party, Bill. I've been working stuff.

      I do hope Pete, Jr. will be all right. So young and he's got a lot to learn in very little time.

      I like the new additions. Hopefully, things will start looking up for them. You've got a good story here, Bill. I've got get caught up on the rest of your stuff. I'm looking forward to that.:)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 18 months ago from Olympia, WA

      I will for sure, Deb. I'm so glad you are enjoying this.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 18 months ago from Stillwater, OK

      Sometimes, it's just time for a less hectic life, and this is one of those times. Carry on.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Mike, I thought I'd try a story where nobody got shot. LOL Thanks for the visit.

    • mckbirdbks profile image

      mckbirdbks 19 months ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

      Hello Bill. This is a story we are all going to just settle in and enjoy the telling.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      You are very welcome, Rasma, and thank you, my friend.

    • Gypsy Rose Lee profile image

      Gypsy Rose Lee 19 months ago from Riga, Latvia

      Thank for the good feelings...

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Vellur, this is a feel-good story, so I promise there will be no deaths. LOL Thank you!

    • Vellur profile image

      Nithya Venkat 19 months ago from Dubai

      Pete Junior has left home but they have new family members. Wonder how things will work out for them but I guess they are going to do just fine. Wonder what if going to happen next. Enjoyed reading.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Michael my friend, if you are weird then you have company in me. :) Have a wonderful day and blessings to you always.

    • Michael-Milec profile image

      Michael-Milec 19 months ago

      Well, it might be only me ( as weird as I am), but the events presented in these stories elevate my soul and my spirit , making Micheal glad and more hopeful as a good news is being spread ( indirectly.)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Good feelings all the way in this story, Michael my friend. This one is destined to make people feel good throughout its life.

      Have a peaceful week, Michael.

    • Michael-Milec profile image

      Michael-Milec 19 months ago

      Oh Bill in your story of loving parents experiencing sadness for go away son , a ' good spirit' brought unexpected opportunity to love a widow and the fatherless, thus reversing sadness into a celebration of new chance to share ...

      Blessings my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      I appreciate that, DDE! Thank you very much.

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 19 months ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Always s o interesting and thoughtful.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Awww, you are very welcome, Shyron. I'm glad this brought those back for you. Thank you, my friend. I'll have more memories for you next week.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image

      Shyron E Shenko 19 months ago from Texas

      Bill, this takes me back to my Mammaw and Pampa's farm, when they had taken in 6 grand children, one of them being me. There were 3 girls and 3 boys, when my mom was in the hospital and my cousins mom had gone to Chicago to look for work to take care of her 3 children, and when my mom got out of the hospital she went to South Bend, IN to look for work.

      Thank you Bill for the treasured memories.

      Blessings always

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Genna. I always appreciate your detailed comments and the support you give. Blessings my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      I will indeed, Frank. I'm just practicing my craft and I appreciate all of you giving me feedback.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you so much, Alicia. It's kind of fun writing about "normal" people.

    • Genna East profile image

      Genna East 19 months ago from Massachusetts, USA

      Corn is such a beautiful story, Bill. I have tears in my eyes as I read about the Harpers, Emma and her little Timothy, and Pete Jr. on his trip to Missouri by riding the rails, hoping to find mining work and send money back home. "We watched until he was just a dot in the distance..." "There was love in this old house, and that love would plug the gaps between boards and keep out the cold winds when they came." No truer words written. :-)

    • Frank Atanacio profile image

      Frank Atanacio 19 months ago from Shelton

      I love the story Billybuc.. has that yesteryear feel.. and by God that feels good.. keep up the good work my friend :)

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 19 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      The characters in this story are lovely, Bill. I'm interested in learning more about the new arrivals.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Surabhi, you are too kind, but thank you very much.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Faith, I've written so many stories about heartache and misery. I thought it was about time I wrote a healthy, heartfelt story about normal people. I'm so glad you enjoyed it.

      blessings my friend...have a wonderful weekend!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Bill. I'm like you. I wish I had grown up on a farm as well. Maybe that's why I write so much about Iowa. :)

    • profile image

      Surabhi Kaura 19 months ago

      I'm in love with the family. So much warmth! You are truly am incredible writer. Loved it, Billy Sir. Peace.

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 19 months ago from southern USA

      Oh, my, Bill, this is my kind of story! When I read the title, I was thinking it was going to be some scary, slasher story (maybe I'm thinking of "Children of the Corn") LOL, but I am so thrilled it is not.

      You've taken us right into the family and the characters come to life, and we feel what they are feeling. Truly great writing. I'm looking forward to reading more of this wonderful series.

      We Southerners just love this kind of stuff to no end.

      Blessings always

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you very much, Jackie! I'll see you next week.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      I'm smiling, Maria. Thank you dear friend.

      love,

      bill

    • bdegiulio profile image

      Bill De Giulio 19 months ago from Massachusetts

      Hi Bill. A wonderful chapter, just as I would have imagined things on a farm years ago. I would have loved an opportunity to work on a farm, talk about an honest day's work. Very much looking forward to the next chapter. Have a great weekend.

    • Jackie Lynnley profile image

      Jackie Lynnley 19 months ago from The Beautiful South

      Enjoyed this much and looking forward to more.

    • marcoujor profile image

      Maria Jordan 19 months ago from Jeffersonville PA

      Oh how my Southern Momma would have loved you and this story, dear Bill. By the way - like Momma, like daughter...

      Have a great weekend. Love, Maria

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Eric! She was my literary idol and inspiration.

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 19 months ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      I just had to come back and give my condolences on the passing of one of your favs. Harper Lee, may she bask is glory!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Missy! That was my goal and it's so nice to received affirmation. Blessings to you my friend.

    • Missy Smith profile image

      Missy Smith 19 months ago from Florida

      Absolutely Love It! You take us back to the good old days in this one. I know things were tough back then, but they were handled in such a trust in God manner; such a "we will be alright as long as we have each other" type of fashion. You bring really good feelings with this one, Bill. A way of life and comradery that has almost completely slipped away in this new age and time. Blessings to you! Great Work! Great Read!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you so much, Bill. I know how much research you've done on this time and place and I am grateful for your affirmations. I'll see you down the road next week.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Sis, you made my day. Thank you! I wanted to see if I could write something where people didn't shoot each other. LOL It's gratifying to know I can. I don't want to be labeled as the "writer of death." LOL

      Seriously, thank you! I'm working on the next chapter now so save up some sighs for next week.

      Love your new profile picture, Sis!

      bill

    • Homeplace Series profile image

      William Leverne Smith 19 months ago from Hollister, MO

      Agree with Eric on this one. You've got the time and words down good. How they often said Ford rather than car. Right out of my Mom's diary, from the thirties; saw her say that many times... BTW, love that first photo. I wrote a monthly magazine column a few years back that I closed with "See you down the road." Always accompanied by a photo image like that... Love it. Keep them coming, friend!! ;-)

    • fpherj48 profile image

      Paula 19 months ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

      Oh bill....My eyes are stinging. Didn't expect that, you sneaky devil you. This is a sigh-maker.....I felt the twinge when they stood watching their son walk away.....(memories of leaving my first born at college so far from home)....the pain. sigh

      Their decision to bring Emma & Timothy to their home, brings Humanity One World, close to mind. It's the way things used to be & how they should still be. sigh

      The incredible love & hope between them....he's putty in her hands....sigh. "You make me a better man"......ohhhhhh BIG sigh!

      I'm in love with these wonderful people and all sighed out...til next time. I don't need to read another thing today....Hugs, Paula (Sis)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      I will do that, Linda. Never fear, Peter Jr. will be heading back in a short while. He's an integral part of this family and story.

      Thank you for your kind words.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Eric, I'm humbled by that. Thank you! I think there is much to be said for the everyday person, their joys, their heartaches...and above all, the love they share. Peace my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Clive. I thought I'd try writing a story where nobody gets shot. LOL

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      I appreciate that, Dora. It's taken years to reach the point where my words have some impact and please me, the writer. :)

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      Linda Lum 19 months ago from Washington State, USA

      Bill, I'm loving this story. The pain of seeing a child leave home is something Father Ryan will never understand; there such a mix of emotions--grief at the loss, fear of the unknown, but yet pride in the amazing person this person you raised has become. You conveyed that beautifully here.

      And what a amazing, loving family to open their home to a neighbor in need. That seems to be a characteristic we, as a Nation, have lost. Now most people have an 'every man for himself' attitude.

      Thank you for continuing this series. I look forward to the next installment (and I hope you might find a way to let us glimpse what is happening with Peter Jr. also).

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 19 months ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      William D. Holland, you are a brilliant writer. I just get all whispy eyed reading these stories of the ooze of love dripping off the pitchfork. Well boy howdy you surely did it this time. I am in love with the family, extended and all.

    • clivewilliams profile image

      Clive Williams 19 months ago from Nibiru

      a very kind and warm story bill

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Isaac Weithers 19 months ago from The Caribbean

      So warm--the family , love and hospitality blend. I just had to repeat, "a smile that had nothing behind it." It's both what you say and how you say it.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you MizB. I don't miss outhouses at all and that's the truth...but the sense of community...that I miss greatly. :)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Manatita! I appreciate it, my friend.

    • MizBejabbers profile image

      MizBejabbers 19 months ago

      Bill, I love the spirit of the good old days, too, but I surely don’t miss not having running water and having to walk down the hill to the outhouse – or the chamber pot. Back in ‘em days extended families were crammed into houses like sardines and thought nothing of it. I have some memories of after WWII of those post-Great Depression days. Today we value our privacy, and I doubt if anyone could do it again without going crazy. Good story, and I look forward to your next chapter.

    • manatita44 profile image

      manatita44 19 months ago from london

      A sweet and gentle approach with a touch of love there to. Very nice, Bro.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Marlene! That kind of reaction is what I was hoping for.

      Have a wonderful weekend, my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Pop, you had me laughing. One of our sons is sleeping in the next room as I write this.

      Thank you for being here. I'm glad you enjoyed it.

    • MarleneB profile image

      Marlene Bertrand 19 months ago from Northern California, USA

      This is the kind of story a person reads to feel warmth and comfort. It leaves me longing for those days when people knew your name and truly cared about your well-being.

      I love it!

    • breakfastpop profile image

      breakfastpop 19 months ago

      And I love this story....Years and years ago it was commonplace to take in family or strangers when they were in need. Now we don't have room because the kids never leave home!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you so much, Ruby! I think it was such an important time for our country, and there were lessons to be learned for those interested in learning about community and fellowship.

    • always exploring profile image

      Ruby Jean Fuller 19 months ago from Southern Illinois

      This was another great chapter. Three cents for a pie unbelievable! When I think about the times people had to endure back then, it makes me sad. Can you imagine us taking in a widow and her small son? There's no wonder people loved President Roosevelt. I love the story too.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you so much, Janine! There isn't a whole lot of action in this story, but that's what I wanted to do....to see if I could write a saga that was not dramatic in nature...so thank you very much for your affirmation. Have a wonderful weekend, Janine!

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      Bill Holland 19 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Honestly, Mike, I long for them too. My wife and I disagree on this point, but I loved the spirit of community that existed back then, and I think we dearly miss it today.

      I'm glad you are enjoying this saga....see you next week, my friend.

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      Janine Huldie 19 months ago from New York, New York

      Bill, this story totally reminds me of when both my grandparents would share of their time during the Great Depression and WWII. It is because of my own grandmother that I became a pretty big history buff growing up. So, I am very much enjoying your latest story, because great fiction with a great historical background definitely makes for a wonderful story to be told. Can't wait for the next installment now. Happy Friday!! :)

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      Old Poolman 19 months ago

      Bill, this story takes me back to my childhood in Iowa when this is just the way things were done. Neighbors helped neighbors. To my knowledge welfare had not been invented yet and there was just nothing else that could be done. I would imagine there are still some smaller communities where this is still the way it is done. I kind of long for the "Good Ole Days."

      Bottom line is I love this story.