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Why The Kindle Is Better Than Books

Updated on November 16, 2015

Kindle - Perfect Holiday Companion

In The Pantone Hotel Foyer reading on The Kindle.
In The Pantone Hotel Foyer reading on The Kindle. | Source

Amazon Kindle Experience

My Amazon Kindle found its way into my life as a gift. I would not have bought one for myself, as I've always been passionate about books.

I could not see any benefit to owning one more electronic device. More junk?

I ignored its presence for several days, and then figured I would give it a try on our upcoming holiday. It would be lighter than carrying around my usual quota of five novels to read.

I packed two spare books in case the battery run out. A Kindle can only be recharged by plugging it into a PC, although you can buy a charger.

Made for Handbags

The first benefit is that The Kindle fits perfectly into the wider mobile phone pouch slots in most handbags. It is slim-line, and very light.

You switch it on from the base, and the page you last stopped upon appears, and you are good to go. No fumbling for the bookmark that slid out of its place.

I worried about the face getting scratched, and after our holiday I invested in a Kindle cover, which gave me more peace of mind.

I think the worst thing you could do is end up with a scratch, as that would detract from the ability to enjoy reading from The Kindle.

My First Ebook

I will always remember my first Ebook.
I will always remember my first Ebook. | Source

Free Kindle Ebooks

Thanks to Richard Sanders, the first Ebook I read on The Kindle was very enjoyable. This science fiction adventure in space, is not the usual genre I prefer, but his book was free from The Kindle Store, and he had written an enticing blurb.

I'd like to add that piracy is not something I go in for, and I don't mind paying for books.

I charged my new Kindle; got the wireless internet search working; found the Kindle Store; and then a book I wanted to pay for. To buy something I had to go and look up passwords for my accounts. I could not be bothered, if I'm honest, and my eye caught on the tab Top 100 free Kindle Books.

Lots of authors like me, are trying to build reputations, with the goal of publishing their novels. I was curious as to why an author would give away their work for free.

Apparently, this is to drive traffic to their author brand, and hopefully, inspire a paid purchase of another of their books. Free books for the kindle are here to stay.

I take care to return to the purchase page and rate the book. Writing a review is more problematic, as The Kindle keyboard is somewhat limited. One finger typing has never suited me.

Work for us! Ha ha.
Work for us! Ha ha. | Source

Free Author Mistakes

Richard Sanders wrote a half decent book. There were one or two minor errors, and I am a forgiving soul, as I understand the writing process.

As I've continued reading free Kindle books complete with, what seems to be, a predictable amount of errors, the thought occurs that the general public is not always as forgiving.

I think that if you decide to publish Kindle ebooks, pay someone to edit the book first. Yes that's right, I said pay someone.

If you are basing your reputation on your free sample, it has to be a perfect sample. If you get carpet samples with thread runs from a salesperson, you don't choose that company.

It is the same principle with Kindle ebooks. I had to delete one of my freebies because it had so many tense errors in Chapter 1.

There is no excuse for mass errors. I was reminded of a forum thread on Authonomy, where potential authors are encouraged to upload their first 600 words of Chapter 1. The thread is called; "If I was an agent I would stop reading ...now."; the idea is that the chapter is thoroughly critiqued for any mistakes.

Numerous online writer sites are available for this purpose. My main criticism of free kindle ebooks is that I've yet to read one that is error free.

Source

Have I Become Commodified?

On the flip side of things, I do wonder I've become such a commodification expert, that I consciously screen out new talent. Perhaps it is okay for a struggling author to publish a less than perfect book to gain attention.

It feels wrong to me to expect human beings to be perfect all of the time. Teachers may agree with me, that if we came down hard on every single error, children would never develop creative confidence.

You see, I'm not being exposed to mainstream authors at the moment. I'm taking a risk with my leisure time, and reading unbranded unknowns, and I don't feel that in life, we are encouraged to do much of that.

The main reason why I currently believe The Kindle is better than books, lies in the delight I feel being able to access unhomogenised literature.

Newly discovered free kindle ebook crime author: Faith Mortimer and The Assassin's Village. It's jolly good for an ebook download. So good you have to pay for it now!

Comments

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  • Sturgeonl profile image

    Sturgeonl 5 years ago

    I wonder if the number of errors in ebooks is due to the increase in self-publishing.I wrote a hub on ebooks as well that you might be interested in.

  • dahoglund profile image

    Don A. Hoglund 5 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids

    I have not gotten a kindle yet but I am sure I will when my budget allows. Typos are part of publishing in this day. I have read books from major publisher with a lot of typos. Same with newspapers etc.

  • ElizaDoole profile image
    Author

    Lisa McKnight 5 years ago from London

    Hey Sturgeon, come back and post your link here if you like :) There is definitely more self published books in the e format. I like that you don't need to be a somebody to do it.

  • ElizaDoole profile image
    Author

    Lisa McKnight 5 years ago from London

    Ah, the forgiving writer, like so many of us. But what about the unforgiving public? Don't you think new authors take a big risk, not paying an editor to double check it before going live?

  • nifwlseirff profile image

    Kymberly Fergusson 5 years ago from Villingen Schwenningen, Germany

    I love my Kindle! It has made travelling a lot easier, and eased the pain of having to sell many of my books before I moved overseas.

  • JamesPoppell profile image

    JamesPoppell 5 years ago

    I own a Kindle and read from it often, however, I still prefer the paperback. There is something about the crisp feeling of a new book and the smell of it. Good hub. Thanks for sharing.

  • JamesPoppell profile image

    JamesPoppell 5 years ago

    I own a Kindle and read from it often, however, I still prefer the paperback. There is something about the crisp feeling of a new book and the smell of it. Good hub. Thanks for sharing.

  • wonderingwoolley profile image

    wonderingwoolley 5 years ago from Madison, WI

    I'm just as conflicted, I love my books, I have 8 book shelves full of books, and more lined up on the floor. I love how they look, how they smell, the satisfaction of turning the last page. Books are great. However, I too received an e-reader (a Nook- the B&N version)as a gift. I was reluctant, but you're right, it does travel easier and makes me feel part of the modern age. My favorite thing about the Nook is that I don't have to wait. If it is 9pm, I don't have to try to find an open library or bookstore for the next book that I HAVE to read. Instead, I double click, and I own it. Also, I love the filing system the Nook has- I can rearrange my e-book collection to my hearts content. It's a tough place to be between the Nook and my Books, but somehow, I think we will all be just fine.

  • ElizaDoole profile image
    Author

    Lisa McKnight 5 years ago from London

    Hadn't thought of it that way. I can see how great it would be for overseas moves and long travel holidays.

  • ElizaDoole profile image
    Author

    Lisa McKnight 5 years ago from London

    You are most welcome. I like a book too, but I must admit the Kindle is becoming addictive now.

  • ElizaDoole profile image
    Author

    Lisa McKnight 5 years ago from London

    I hadn't thought of the instant purchase aspect. How true. You can buy from it anywhere at anytime. I like reading it on the commuter train, it is much less of a space intrusion than a laptop.

  • ElizaDoole profile image
    Author

    Lisa McKnight 5 years ago from London

    Sry 1. @nif 2. @james 3. @ ww

  • Jean Bakula profile image

    Jean Bakula 5 years ago from New Jersey

    I still haven't taken the plunge, but as a reader who reads at least 2 books a week, the ease of buying them right from the device sounds great!

  • mljdgulley354 profile image

    mljdgulley354 5 years ago

    I haven't invested in a Kindle but I do like to read.

  • Storytellersrus profile image

    Barbara 5 years ago from Stepping past clutter

    I shouldn't have read this hub!!! I do not want any reason to get a Kindle... but alas, you have given me one; the ability to read fresh literature tempts me.

    However I am with you. If an author is going to distribute work to a general audience, the work must meet certain guidelines. It seems egotistical to expect others to sort through your trash to find the pearl. A good author separates the pearl from the toilet paper.

    I'm just saying... not all original work is bacteria free. And I don't have time or money to sort through it all! I expect an author to be honest with himself or herself and at least get the grammar right.

    That being said, I wrote a book for my mom once and self-published it for the family. Probably a year later, I finally read it and discovered I had misspelled potatoes through half the book!!! So, once again I am complaining about mistakes I myself have made in earnest, lol!

  • robie2 profile image

    Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

    Like you I was given a Kindle as a gift about a year ago and I really love it. What surprised me was how many of my friends sneered at my Kindle and said they preferred books and would never get one-- I was amazed at their defensiveness since I don't view it as an either/or thing. I love all the advantages of the Kindle that you point out so well, and I still love turning the pages of a paper book. I don't have to choose. I can do BOTH ( duh)

    Love this hub-- and voting it up up up

  • ElizaDoole profile image
    Author

    Lisa McKnight 5 years ago from London

    @Jean - I agree, we have become such an "I want that right now" generation. The Kindle really fits that psyche.

  • ElizaDoole profile image
    Author

    Lisa McKnight 5 years ago from London

    @story tellersrus - your potato anecdote made me smile, and I am pleased something I wrote is persuasive. It is nice to share good ideas with like minded folk.

    @robie2 - I've had the same reaction with some people. I've always liked having a book personality, whereby people come to the house and see what I read. However, I like the Kindle for storage and portability as well. I'm wilth you.

    We can have the best of both worlds :)

  • profile image

    Robbswater 5 years ago

    I could not even think about a Kindle. My husband suggest that he would buy me one I was horrified. Books are like friends. I read them and years later re read them. Its like visiting old friends. I have thousands and could not bare to part with them. But the younger generation I believe love them.

  • hoteltravel profile image

    hoteltravel 5 years ago from Thailand

    Kindle is great for all the reasons listed here. But it lacks the smell and feel of real books, which gives me a high. Each has its own advantages. Voting up and useful!

  • profile image

    Robbswater 5 years ago

    I have a very worn copy of 'A Country Child' by Alison Uttley. I love re reading it. Its as though I have gone back to see how everyone is doing!!!!!!!!!!!

  • watcher by night profile image

    watcher by night 5 years ago

    Eliza, I really enjoy my Kindle too. There are a lot of ebook versions of books and short stories with expired copyrights that I've downloaded for free to build up my virtual Kindle library. It depends on my mood though: sometimes I like to curl up with a "real" book.

  • ElizaDoole profile image
    Author

    Lisa McKnight 5 years ago from London

    @hotel and robbswater and watcher - I can see you all now, sitting by the fire with your pipe and slippers, and your unelectronic, unsensitive books roasting along with you as you read. Toasty!

  • watcher by night profile image

    watcher by night 5 years ago

    hee... now a Kindle with a "fireside, pipe, and slippers" app would be a dandy thing...

  • Eric Newland profile image

    Eric Newland 5 years ago from Dayton, Ohio

    Always been a fan of the Kindle. If nothing else it pays for itself over time; I like being able to pay for the words while cutting out the cost of those middle men we call paper and ink.

    However, I've seen reviews to the effect that even mainstream books fall prey to errors. There are typos in the Kindle versions of some books that don't exist in the print versions. Gotta wonder how much those transcriptionists are paid.

  • ElizaDoole profile image
    Author

    Lisa McKnight 5 years ago from London

    @ watcher by night - Plus a hot steak and ale pie and a wheat beer from Belgium. I'm there. *sigh*

  • ElizaDoole profile image
    Author

    Lisa McKnight 5 years ago from London

    @ eric - I sometimes cynically wonder if they made the older book titles free on Amazon etc, so that great typists (like many of us writers) wouldn't make a buck transcribing them and selling them as Kindle titles. As the royalty and copyright has expired, they were quick to generously give those Kindle titles out for free using transcribed versions. The rage within me is quite high over that.

  • klanguedoc profile image

    Kevin Languedoc 5 years ago from Canada

    Great Hub. I enjoy your voice Eliza. I have a Kobo and like you I received it as a gift. Since it is an Android, I can also put apps on it, but I haven't so far. I downloaded a ton of free ebooks. I think I'm set for the next year.

  • ElizaDoole profile image
    Author

    Lisa McKnight 5 years ago from London

    klangudoc - too true - I think the nice bit is reading all of these new authors. They all seem to love writing US New York City crime books in my case. I've read about three now. I'm ready to visit the Bronx.

  • klanguedoc profile image

    Kevin Languedoc 5 years ago from Canada

    Haha :)

  • prasadjain profile image

    Dr.S.P.PADMA PRASAD 5 years ago from Tumkur

    Yes, what you have observed is true. I too have come across such things

  • ElizaDoole profile image
    Author

    Lisa McKnight 5 years ago from London

    Thanks prasadjain for the comment. It would only be a matter of time before I discovered a great writer. Hubbers I have to big up this writer: B A Morton and the book Mrs Jones.

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Mrs-Jones-ebook/dp/B006OEV...

    I got it free on the Kindle in my drive to read new talent. It is now about $1 to buy. It is a NYC meets the British crime story and really generic and well written and enjoyable. A great holiday read. Let's get behind the little guys - like us!

  • vespawoolf profile image

    vespawoolf 5 years ago from Peru, South America

    I also love my Kindle. Since I don't have access to book stores it's been a life saver for me. As you mentioned, it's convenient for travel and lightweight. I've also read some free books and found many of them delightful. There is something intimate about reading books that aren't in the mainstream. Thank you for an interesting hub! Voted up and interesting.

  • Michael J Rapp profile image

    Michael J Rapp 5 years ago from United States

    I'm gradually coming over the the idea of ebooks, but I haven't purchased a Kindle yet. I love real books, but fact is, unless they are hardbound classics, they are such a waste once I'm done reading them. For the environment as well as my wallet I'll probably make the switch . . . eventually. :-) Great hub!

  • ElizaDoole profile image
    Author

    Lisa McKnight 5 years ago from London

    Hey thanks Michael and Vespa. I've been reading a hardback the last couple of days - Towers of Midnight by Robert Jordan (any fantasy lovers out there?) and I can add another Kindle benefit, it is easier on the wrists!

  • ElizaDoole profile image
    Author

    Lisa McKnight 5 years ago from London

    I will check it out thanks SturgeonL. You are right about the errors I think it is harder for us to view our own mistakes.

  • ElizaDoole profile image
    Author

    Lisa McKnight 5 years ago from London

    I imagine one day you will join the rest of us. Technology does have a habit of doing that.

  • ElizaDoole profile image
    Author

    Lisa McKnight 5 years ago from London

    Me too it is so good for overseas travel.

  • mesacleanpools profile image

    mesacleanpools 5 years ago from Mesa, Arizona

    I haven't bought a Kindle or a Nook and I don't know if I ever will. This is how I think of it: I'm always on the computer for work, when I want to read a book I don't think I would like to read it off another electronic device. Reading from an actual book, in a way, allows my eyes to rest and not get tired or strained from reading off of a screen. But who knows, maybe one day I'll jump on the bandwagon!

  • ElizaDoole profile image
    Author

    Lisa McKnight 5 years ago from London

    Hi Mesa, up to you, the only thing I would say I found quite surprising was that because the screen is back lit, it does not tire your eyes at all. It is like the first video LED game screens. Borrow a friend's first maybe?

  • Matt Stan profile image

    Matt Stan 5 years ago from Colorado

    @mesacleanpools I totally agree. Holding a real book and manually flipping the pages is its' own experience. I enjoy being able to turn a book to the side and veiw progress. I like dog-earing pages. It's the little things...

  • ElizaDoole profile image
    Author

    Lisa McKnight 4 years ago from London

    True but I have to rate the Kindle for those who get sore wrists. It is so light to the touch, and perhaps is a good gift for the elderly for that reason.

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