ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Why Was My Book Rejected? Ten Reasons For Rejection

Updated on January 3, 2014

The Agony of Defeat

I take rejection as someone blowing a bugle in my ear to wake me up and get going, rather than retreat.

Sylvester Stallone

Hey, when Rocky speaks I listen!

Seriously, how many of you are currently writing a book? How many of you have written a book? How many of you are planning on writing a book? Chances are, with those three questions, I have included about 90% of the writers reading this article. That’s good because it means maybe, just maybe, I have something of value for you within the following 1,200 words. Let’s hope that is the case.

You spend months writing a book. My first novel took me two years from starting date to publication date. Two years of my life I will never get back; two years of blood, sweat and tears devoted to 80,000 words, and when I had finished that book it was met with a resounding YAWN from agents and publishers. Two years….as though those two years had no meaning to them at all…..because they didn’t. In the world of traditional publishing, the effort that goes into a book means absolutely nothing to editors, agents and publishers. All they care about is the end result. Is your book good and does it have a chance of striking a chord with the reading public?

Even if you take the non-traditional publication route and self-publish, the bottom line is still….is your book good and does it have a chance of striking a chord with the reading public?

Perhaps you have already experienced rejection, either by an agent/publisher or by the reading public. If so, there is a better than even chance that the rejection was because of one, or more, of the following reasons.

Very entertaining

You missed your target audience
You missed your target audience | Source

YOU DIDN’T DELIVER

When you write a query letter to an agent/publisher, you are basically giving a quick summary of your book, and you are promising that your book will be about a particular subject. If you do not deliver on that promise you are signing your own literary death warrant. In other words, if I say, in the summary of the book, that it is about a young boy coming of age, and it ends up being a simple romance, then I blew it with agents and I blew it with the reading public.

MISSED THE TARGETED GENRE AUDIENCE

We see this most often with age appropriate work. In other words, a YA novel might have sex scenes and thus not be “relevant,”’ or a nostalgic look at the 60’s is represented as a children’s book. Those are extreme examples but they do point out the importance of labeling your novel with the correct genre.

IT LACKS PIZZAZZ

Hundreds of thousands of books are written every year. Millions have been written. Your goal, as a writer, is to somehow write something that is authentic and unique. Good luck!

Boy meets girl. Boy falls in love with girl. Boy and girls live happily ever after. How many times has that story been written? It is the basis for every love story ever written. So how are you going to make that basic, done-to-death story new and fresh? If you can’t then don’t write it. Please!

The hook just was not there
The hook just was not there | Source

THE HOOK IS GREAT BUT THE REST IS GARBAGE

The Ten Second Rule, which states that you better have one heck of a hook to reel in your reader within the first ten seconds, is crucial for any writer, and because it is crucial, much time is spent on that opening chapter. But what about the rest of the book? Surprisingly, many writers who get rejected dazzle agents and publishers with an opening chapter worthy of Steinbeck, only to write the next 300 pages worthy of Peter Steinway of Hoboken, New Jersey.

The reason why writing a successful novel is so difficult is because a writer must remain consistently good for over 300 pages. The story line must stay consistent. The characters must remain alive and vibrant for 300 pages. This is not an easy thing to do, and many fail miserably in trying to do it.

THE WRITING IS JUST PLAIN BAD

Yes, there is always this possibility. As harsh as it may sound it is a reality some must face. The grammar is horrible. There are misspellings. The plot does not hold together under scrutiny. The book is just boring.

But there is hope! For those who might fall under this category, never fear. This is why God made editors and ghostwriters. Spend the money and utilize the talents of a professional editor or ghostwriter and all problems will be solved.

THE NOVEL SUFFERS FROM DRAG ALONG DISEASE

I like to call this the “Russian Syndrome.” My apologies to some of the great Russian novelists, but I think you understand the point. Your opening chapter is fantastic, and there is promise in your words early on….and then….and then….the story becomes mired in minor details, or there are rambling discourses that put the reader to sleep.

A good novel has a rhythm to it. A good novel is alive. A good novel flows effortlessly. Bad novels do none of those things.

The writing lacked boldness
The writing lacked boldness | Source

THE WRITING LACKS BOLDNESS

You can tell when a writer lacks confidence in the book they have written. The descriptions become overly-detailed. The adjectives and adverbs increase in number. There are endless explanations of what is happening just in case the reader can’t figure it out from the mundane writing. Instead of trusting the plot, the writer adds more and more elements of surprise that have nothing to do with the main storyline. All of these are signs that a writer does not trust in his craft.

THE READER IS LEFT DEVOID OF EMOTIONAL ATTACHMENT.

One of the jobs of a writer is to appeal to the five senses of the reader; an equally important job is to somehow make an emotional attachment with the reader. If you have failed to do either, or both, of these, the reader will feel nothing as they read your book, and that my friends is a kiss of death.

You have all read such a book. My acid test for this? If I can put a book down and not feel an urge to pick it back up again, then the writer has failed in his/her job.

HUGE DISAPPOINTMENT AT THE END

The writer builds the suspense, and then builds it some more. The reader is invested and excited, can hardly wait for the finish….and then….nothing. The book falls flat on its face, and as a reader I am a bit bitter to say the least.

If you are going to write a book then there had better be a payout worthy of the time I invested in reading it. Period!

IN THE END, THE BOOK WAS JUST A BIT TOO WEAK

Understand this about agents and publishers: they are approached thousands of times each month with book proposals. They are not looking for good books; they are looking for great books.

There is a very good reason why the masters of writing are considered masters: they create great works of art. They have that extra something that separates them from the rest of the pack. If you receive a rejection letter from an agent or a publisher telling you that they liked your work but it wasn’t quite what they hoped for, they are trying to tell you that it was lacking the “great factor.” If that is the case then go back to the drawing board and make it great.

Are you currently writing a novel?

See results

Those Are the Top Ten Reasons for Rejection

Again, I am speaking to anyone who writes a book, whether you try to publish it the traditional way or you are publishing an ebook. Either the publisher will reject you in the traditional setting or the readers of ebooks will reject you in the non-traditional setting.

Knowledge is power. Now that you know the pitfalls that await you in the publishing world, you can work to avoid them. As I have stated in earlier articles, the author is often too close to his/her work to objectively make decisions on quality. Get in touch with an editor before you try to publish. It will cost you some money to do so, but it just might prevent you from singing the Rejection Blues.

2013 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

“Helping writers to spread their wings and fly.”

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      The publishing world is rough and tough and it leaves one feeling less energetic after rejection. Your reasons are so correct. A well informed and useful hub.

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 3 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      Wait just a second --- these were all the reasons my last ten love's rejected me. I thought you were going to talk about writing a book.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      DDE, I agree with you, it saps the desire right out of a writer....but we must continue. :)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      LOL....Eric, I think I'll just shut up and not comment. :) Thanks for the laugh buddy.

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 3 years ago from Central Florida

      What I get from this article is that the writer should write as if s/he is the reader. We all know what keeps us turning the pages and what has us putting the book on a shelf - maybe to be finished when you've read everything else in your library.

      And yes, editing is important. In addition to grammatical corrections, an editor will spot inconsistencies and lulls in the story. Another set of eyes is always helpful.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Your first sentence was the best, Sha! If we can remember what it is about special books that we like, then all we have to do....LOL...is replicate it. :)

    • Eiddwen profile image

      Eiddwen 3 years ago from Wales

      So interesting and of course as always so very useful.

      As writers we have to stand strong against rejection and not lose heart which you spell out oh so clearly my friend. Another to vote up, across and share.

      Eddy.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Hi Eddy! Not a pleasant subject for writers but one that needs to be understood.

      Blessings, thanks and love heading your way.

      billy

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 3 years ago from Queensland Australia

      Hey Bill, good hub. I am a Stephan King fan but I grabbed a copy of his novel "It" awhile back. Got through four pages and just couldn't get into it, the frst chapter didn't have the 'x' factor to make me want to keep reading, and I still haven't picked it up again to this day. So even great writers can't always get it right. (This is only my opinion by the way, I know others who enjoyed "It".)

    • Jackie Lynnley profile image

      Jackie Lynnley 3 years ago from The Beautiful South

      This is good. I have had a novel sitting just long enough I think I could almost go into as the reader not author now and see how bad it hits me!

      Up, over and shared.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      John, that is interesting. I have read some of King's works and loved them, while others I couldn't get interested in. An oddity considering what a good writer he is. I'm glad I'm not alone. :) Thanks my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jackie, I have a short story that has been sitting now for thirteen years....I just can't finish it...it is that bad. LOL I feel your pain my friend.

    • MG Singh profile image

      MG Singh 3 years ago from Singapore

      An excellent hub with loads of advise.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you MG; I'm glad you find this helpful.

    • Happyboomernurse profile image

      Gail Sobotkin 3 years ago from South Carolina

      I always enjoy hearing about how many "rejections" some of the best known writers received before becoming famous and successful.

      I like the points you made, however, because it reminds us that when we receive a rejection, we need to take another look at what we submitted and if we see some of the above issues, we need to correct them before submitting the work elsewhere.

      Thanks for the tips.

      Hugs & Love,

      Gail

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Hi Gail! I hope you are doing okay during the big snowstorm. Stay warm and safe my friend.

      It is easy to blame the publisher if our book is rejected; it is not so easy to look at our own part in that rejection. :) Such is life!

      blessings and hugs coming your way

      bill

    • mpropp profile image

      Melissa Propp 3 years ago from Minnesota

      I can only imagine the sting of rejection (using my imagination because I haven't finished that novel yet and therefore never put it out there!) after receiving a rebuke from the publishing world...but this advice is very helpful to keep in mind while writing. I don't suppose the publishers usually give you any details or specifics when rejecting you, so this is very illuminating. Thanks!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Melissa, rarely will you get any specifics from a publisher regarding why they rejected you; they don't have the time to go into specifics....but if you do hear from one and they do detail the problems, that is gold for a writer. At least then you know what you can fix.

      I hope you aren't buried in snow although I suspect that you are.

      Happy New Year Melissa.

    • bdegiulio profile image

      Bill De Giulio 3 years ago from Massachusetts

      Bill, it's amazing how much is involved in becoming a published author. You said something that really struck me, "if you can put a book down and not feel the urge to pick it up again then the author has failed". This is so, so true. When I am into a book, I read it every free second that I have. I stay up late and wake up early because I can't put it down. I think this is really the true test and it certainly seems like a difficult thing to accomplish. Great job as always. Have a great weekend.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Bill, it is indeed a difficult thing to accomplish. Perhaps that is why there are few really "great" authors. :) Thank you Sir and I hope your weekend is fantastic as well.

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Rejection, yes, it is painful, but we must be mindful that all the great writers of our time were rejected over and over. I believe the key is to NEVER give up and believe in yourself, plus be able to take constructive criticism for sure.

      Great top ten points to keep in mind when writing for sure. Thank you for sharing, Bill.

      Up and more and sharing

      Blessings, Faith Reaper

    • profile image

      dragonflycolor 3 years ago

      I started my book yesterday and feel great about making it to page 3. And if my husband won't take no for an answer when he wants to cuddle, then I won't either from book publishers!

    • Genna East profile image

      Genna East 3 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

      Fear of the “Rejection Blues” can strike at the spirit and confidence of any writer. Your wonderful ten-point outline arms us with the very tools we all need to help avoid that dreaded song. Excellent, as always. Thank you, Bill! :-)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      dragon...LOL...that is a priceless comment. Thanks for the laugh and good look with that book.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Genna, thank you! Unfortunately even following these ten points does not assure success, but they sure increase your chances.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Faith, it is always lovely having you drop by my humble abode. Thank you...I look at rejection this way...I'm in very good company. :)

      blessings always my friend and have a wonderful weekend.

      bill

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 3 years ago

      Great piece of advice for writers to keep in mind as they write. I wish I could have been at the writer's workshop to hear Garrison speak. If one follows all your advice (your entire collection and blogs), they can't help but be successful. Blessings, dear friend.

    • brakel2 profile image

      Audrey Selig 3 years ago from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

      Another great hub, Bill. You have come up with the reasons based on experiences with your own books. That knowledge is invaluable. Your credibility and advice might get a few books published by some hubbers. Thanks for sharing. Blessings. Audrey. Pinning.

    • Nadine May profile image

      Nadine May 3 years ago from Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa

      It is always good to read what other authors have experienced on how to get their book in print. Very good advice, and all I want to add is, never give up! I knew from the start that my visionary fiction novels might not appeal to a wide readership, simply because it's not written just for entertainment, or escapism. I've written a hub about my journey on how I found my publisher and today, being very involved in the publishing industry, we as publishers only look for books that makes a difference to the readers lives! That is our motto.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Some of the novels I've read lately have suffered from these. I wish they had a better editor. You provide good points of advice.

    • alancaster149 profile image

      Alan Robert Lancaster 3 years ago from Forest Gate, London E7, U K (ex-pat Yorkshire)

      The New Year's on us, Bill. Stuffed as we might be with turkey - you'se lot get it twice a year! - and Crimbo Pud, the grey matter's got to get some exercise even if the rest of the body says 'No chance!'

      Good advice, but I think you're on a loser with that Authorhouse ad on this Hubpage (just thought you might like to know. I moved to New Generation Publishing, cheaper deal and better priced books for your projected reading public. Has AH anything to do with Readers' Digest?)

    • always exploring profile image

      Ruby Jean Fuller 3 years ago from Southern Illinois

      If i ever write a book ( HaHa ) i will remember your tips. All kidding aside, your hubs are always helpful. Thank you..

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Dianna, I agree; I would have loved to hear Garrison speak....such an easy going, relaxed manner, and a ton of wisdom too boot.

      Thank you for your kindness. One day I'll put this all in an ebook and publish it....one of these days. :)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Audrey, wouldn't that be fantastic if it were to happen. I would be as proud as a new papa. Thank you for your kind words my friend and have a great weekend.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Nadine, I love that motto. You sound like a publisher I would be proud to handle my new book that is still being written. That's what I want from that book...to make a difference in someone's life. What higher gift could we hope for? Thank you Nadine!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Flourish, I second that opinion. I often wonder what their editors were doing when they should have been editing? LOL Thank you and enjoy your weekend.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Alan, I honestly don't know. That ad is one of the automatically generated ads by Adsense and I don't know if they have an affiliation with Reader's Digest...I'll have to research that and find out. Anyway, Happy New Year my friend. Now I need to go for a walk to get rid of the last of that turkey. :)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ruby, I love that you support me even when the hub does not relate to you. Thank you for that loyalty my friend. I value loyalty greatly and I value you as well.

    • VVanNess profile image

      Victoria Van Ness 3 years ago from Prescott Valley

      Thanks for the tips! I hope this helps my luck in publishing in the future! :)

    • grandmapearl profile image

      Connie Smith 3 years ago from Southern Tier New York State

      Billy, I'm glad you mentioned ebooks, because that is probably the way I would approach my first 'great work' in the publishing field. If ever I am 'published', you will be the very first to know, because you have taught me so many valuable writing lessons. Thank you, my dear friend ;) Pearl

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Hi Victoria! Thanks for stopping by and I sure hope this helps you when the time comes for you.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Pearl, I expect to hear about that publishing because I'll be wanting a copy of that bestseller. :) Thanks for stopping by on what I assume is a frigid Saturday in NY.

      bill

    • DREAM ON profile image

      DREAM ON 3 years ago

      Every time I read your hubs it's like I am yelling B I N G O and watching the look on every ones face. I get it but they don't. An inside joke. All the people who play bingo go to win.There can only be a few winners and the rest aren't so lucky.They come close and maybe next time they will win. Right now your hub is the winner and I am very proud to call it for you. Happy New Year and I am still cheering.

    • btrbell profile image

      Randi Benlulu 3 years ago from Mesa, AZ

      Great advice, Bill! As an avid reader, I often thought I had the makings of "the great American novel" in my head. It seems the older I get, the more I realize that is probably not my forte. You have hit so many valid points here. I think contacting an editor beforehand is wise advice. I would also advise people to follow a blog like yours.

      Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Dream On, what a great comment and very creative. Thank you for calling BINGO....I feel like a winner today. :)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Randi! It may be true that everyone has a book in them, but writing that book is another ball of wax for sure. I hope you have a wonderful day with family, friends and love.

    • profile image

      sheilamyers 3 years ago

      Getting all of those rejection letters from agents stinks. As a brand new author, I took it for granted that agents know exactly what they're talking about. Sometimes they do and sometimes they don't. So what did I learn from those rejections? There was room for improving some of my descriptions of characters and settings. I got high praise for my over-all style and knowledge of the genre. What almost every one of the agents hated was my ending, but being the know-it-all, I'm-not-changing-a-thing author I was, I refused to change the end. What do the reader's say? They LOVE the way I ended the story. So I say if someone is getting rejection notices they should work harder at having a polished manuscript (good plot, well-developed characters, use of proper grammar, etc), but hold onto your vision.

    • cclitgirl profile image

      Cynthia Calhoun 3 years ago from Western NC

      Good points here. See, when I've tried at my three different fiction novels, I KNOW there was always something missing. It's not about confidence: I'm actually quite confident in my writing abilities. It's just that there was a nagging feeling about writing those books: that it was too simple, too flat, the story wasn't original enough and invariably, I could never turn them into something I wanted to read. Eh, some would say I'm a quitter. Me? I call it: I'm finding my writer's voice, testing the waters and seeing what I'm good at. I wanted to stretch myself to write fiction; I'd never really done it before. But, I am much more comfortable writing non-fiction. Because I had to try the fiction route to make sure, I'm even more comfortable with non-fiction. Oh, th places we'll go, lol.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Cyndi, I had an interesting revelation the other day while I was working on my novel. You mentioned finding your voice...I realized that I am finding my new and better voice through my main character. I identify with him...I understand how he feels and what the thinks...I am comfortable with this free verse style of writing....so that, in a very real sense, I am becoming the writer that my main character is. It is a fascinating process and I am loving it. :) Thanks for your thoughts lil Sis!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sheila, I love it. I have nothing to add to your comment...it is perfect. :) Thank you!

    • oceansnsunsets profile image

      Paula 3 years ago from The Midwest, USA

      I loved the opening quote by Stallone, and I have never heard that before! Excellent! As for the rest of the hub, I think its wonderful to take an honest look at the possible reasons for publication rejection. The time devoted that is lost turns out to be not really lost as you learn and grow and share how. It is experience at the very least. Thanks for helping other writers out there.

    • vkwok profile image

      Victor W. Kwok 3 years ago from Hawaii

      So true, Bill. It's hard to get published the traditional way.

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 3 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Very useful tips, as always, Bill. I love the opening quote, too! Thanks for continuing to share your excellent advice for writers.

    • alancaster149 profile image

      Alan Robert Lancaster 3 years ago from Forest Gate, London E7, U K (ex-pat Yorkshire)

      With or without cranberry sauce? It could make all the difference - ten or so steps before nature takes its course...

      Have a good one [New Year] while you still can, what's left of it (360 days)!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      oceansnsunsets, experience for sure, and with each new experience we grow as writers. Thanks for taking the time to visit and comment.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Yes it is, vkwok, but I won't be discouraged.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Alicia! I enjoy finding quotes that work best for my articles.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Alan, I am rushing to get everything done before 2014 closes. Thanks for the prodding. :)

    • b. Malin profile image

      b. Malin 3 years ago

      I'm BACK!

      As I read your Wonderful and Informative Hub Bill, I was struct by how reject is for us writers...It's so hard to take, but you, in your usual style show us the way...A Lesson learned. And I might add, how many times a Writer is rejected (even the so called best) before the Magic happens. Thanks for a very Thoughtful Hub.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      And I am so very happy that you are back, lounging in the Florida sunshine and gloating about it. LOL Good to see you here my friend and thank you.

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 3 years ago from England

      Hi Billy, I remember this well! lol! back in the 80s I wrote a book, I thought it was great! but it got rejected, only the once because it went into a drawer and stayed there! but the funny thing is that a few months later someone else came up with the self same story, it was a reincarnation one set in the time of the plague in london, and of course it was great, so I thought, well no good trying again they will think I copied it! Ironically! so yes it has to be good all the way through, so how the heck did fifty shades get published? lol! yes I know, don't answer that! great advice as always, nell

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Nell, I can't count the number of books I have read where I asked the same question...how the heck did this ever get published? It is so random at times; the perfect confluence of time, place, publisher and writer....sometimes there is no logic to it. Keep writing my friend and thank you.

    • Michael-Milec profile image

      Michael-Milec 3 years ago

      Good evening Bill.

      H'm. Brilliant propositions to stay alive after a knockout punch, and to fight to win.

      Useful, beautiful and interesting.

      Good night my friend .

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Good morning Michael my friend!

      Thank you for the kind words, Michael. I hope this finds you warm and safe from winter's vengeance. Have a wonderful week and blessings, always.

      bill

    • Michael-Milec profile image

      Michael-Milec 3 years ago

      Hello Bill, you're always coming with new challenges; what to say about winter coming with its best special accomplishment : giving us cleaner air, free testing of health, physical condition, strength and " love " to share. My neighbor across the street has pulled car out of garage some 12feet, slowly went back, returning to the house got stuck in snow, I ran to rescue. One other neighbor in an attempt do drive, was spinning , turnig nowhere , I went to push his car for awhile. We never have this kind enjoyment during the Summer ! And a great gain, my fit bit dashboard shows 2,666 steps, 934 calories burned, 1.17 miles distance, and one min. very active for the day. It's wonderful!

      Wishing you safe and successfull day my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      LOL...Michael my friend, you have found the positives in a bleak situation and I salute you for it. I love it...2,666 steps....bravo my friend. Now go inside and warm up; you have earned it.

      blessings always

      bill

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 3 years ago from SW England

      Great advice as always, bill! This sets everything out so neatly and clearly; a tremendously useful tool for every writer, to have a check-list next to him/her. It's like having someone at your elbow, saying 'go back and look at that again; can you say it better?'

      Brilliant! Have a great evening! Ann

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, greetings from the chilly United States. Thank you for your kind words. I'll settle for "brilliant" any old day. I hope you have a wonderful week my friend.

      bill

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 3 years ago from SW England

      Yes, I gather it's freezing over there; we've seen it on tv. Trouble is, your lousy weather is giving us all this rain and floods; just don't send us the snow too! Ann

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, I make no promises. This is a strange winter, following a strange summer. One wonders when the strangeness will end. :)

      bill

    • Vellur profile image

      Nithya Venkat 3 years ago from Dubai

      The publishing world is very cruel and harsh. It is very difficult to survive and come out on top. Your hub definitely shows the way to success in the publishing world, informative and useful hub. Thank you for sharing.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Vellur! I hope this helps someone and keeps them from giving up.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 3 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      This could not have come at a better time. Thanks, Billy, as you have just warned me in advance.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Deb, I love it...perfect timing and you are very welcome.

    • profile image

      Jane Arden 3 years ago

      Hi Bill. Here I am with all the information in my head that I want to put into my book. But I obviously want to do it right. So I start searching the Internet, "How can I make the reader not want to put the book down?" My brain gets confused at all the varied advice out there. Then I had a bright idea. Why am I surfing the net when I have Billybuc. I'l surf his page instead. As usual, you havent failed me. This hub has helped me tremendously. THE READER IS LEFT DEVOID OF EMOTIONAL ATTACHMENT. This is what I need to work on and IN THE END, THE BOOK WAS JUST A BIT TOO WEAK.......Because no matter how good the plot or account, its nothing if not told right, the same as a joke is only as funny as its deliverer. Thank you Bill again for all your writing wisdom!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Lesley, I am glad to be of assistance. As I said before, your book is a wonderful story....now let others see it that way. Attack their senses so that they feel ownership in the book as well. I know you can do it.

    • profile image

      Jane Arden 3 years ago

      Thank you for having faith in me. It gives me the motivation to try harder and carry on.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You are very welcome, Lesley!

    Click to Rate This Article