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Wring the Most out of Your Writing

Updated on August 13, 2014

A Flash from the Past

For those of you still in diapers, so to speak, I’m going to tell you the origin of this article before I actually, well, write the article.

I was born in 1948, and during my early childhood, modern conveniences were unheard of in our household. My folks were lower-middle class, and they worked hard to pay the bills. There just wasn’t any money left over for conveniences.

One thing I clearly remember from those very early days was my mother doing the laundry down in the basement. We did not have a washing machine. All laundry was done using what I call a wringer washer. There was a metal tub, and a hand-cranked wringer. You dipped the clothing in the tub of water, cranked it through the wringer to get the moisture out of it, and then you hung it on the clothesline to dry.

Now consider your writing. Are you wringing the most out of it, or are you putting it on the clothesline while it is still dripping wet?

You may not know what I’m talking about, but hopefully you will by the time I’m done with a few examples. At the risk of seeming self-serving, I’m going to use some passages from my last novel, Resurrecting Tobias, and from my latest, unfinished, novel, Shadows Kill, to demonstrate how you can dig deeper and get the most out of your writing.

I have mentioned before my admiration for writers like John Steinbeck who seemed to embrace brilliance in every paragraph that they wrote. On my best days I might write one brilliant sentence. To do that over and over again for three-hundred pages is beyond my imagination….but that is my goal. I don’t know what your goal is, but if you are interested in moving to the next level of your craft, then these examples might prove helpful to you.

Resurrecting Tobias
Resurrecting Tobias | Source

Setting the Mood

From "Resurrecting Tobias:"

“This is the underbelly of the monster we call civilization, the side of town you won’t find in the tourist brochures, and it is featured each night in every city across the Red, White and Blue. Take a deep breath and inhale the aroma of piss and vomit, ten-day old trash and fear. Hope flows from the building gutters. Misery pools on the streets below. The politicians ignore it and hope it will go away without affecting tourism too badly. The “decent folks” avert their eyes and drive just a bit faster on their way to Grandma’s house, and the residents sentenced to life without bars just keep on keeping on, waiting for nothing and expecting less.”

My goal with this passage was to establish a dark mood. I believe I did so by appealing to the senses of my readers. Hopefully, as you read this passage, your senses are on alert. You can see the darkness. You can smell the piss and vomit. You can sense the fear and possibly even hear the sounds of agony in the background.

Most of you have seen such a scene in your own lives, so you have a frame of reference that you can relate to. That is what a writer hopes to achieve. The writer is a miner, digging for commonalities that the reader will recognize.

Tapping into Emotions

Again from "Resurrecting Tobias:"

“ Whatever my problem was in the past, this time was different. The years rushed by parallel with the hours. Sights and sounds from the past invaded my semi-consciousness, faces and names and actions taken and not taken, all there for me to see; all there for me to learn from. The mistakes were served up with a side dish of humble pie. The acts of good were sprinkled in for flavoring. All together it was a tasty meal of my past and a promise of a better future. I saw my mom and dad again. I saw a man wearing prison orange. I saw the insignia of government power wrapped in the red, white and blue, the faces of those gone far too young, and a child I never held, and yet, loved.

Maria floated by smiling her love, whispering words of support, and lifting me up with her touch, and faces of those I had helped along the way stopped by for a howdy and a shoulder punch. I also saw three children I did not recognize, playing in a yard, laughing as they ran through a sprinkler, youthful and lanky and obviously in love with life, and next to them three people who died much too early because of my actions, smiling at me and telling me that it was all right.”

Some writers use dream sequences as a way of foreshadowing what is going to happen in the remainder of the book. I decided to have my main character visit an Indian sweat lodge. The passage refers to what he saw during a hallucination while in that sweat lodge, and it all serves the purpose of foreshadowing. In effect, I have told my readers what is going to happen during the rest of the book, without really giving away any important plot facts.

Recycle your old writing and bring new life to it
Recycle your old writing and bring new life to it | Source

Finding Our Dark Side

For this lesson, let’s visit my latest novel, "Shadows Kill:"

“I do not want you to suffer, my dear. It is Mr. Baker who will feel the pain of loss. I will make your ordeal as painless as possible. I promise you that. Perhaps you would like to know what I am going to do. Yes?”

“This is a lovely knife, don’t you think? Perfectly balanced you know. The Japanese take great pride in crafting only the finest knives. This particular one is called a Hira because of its blade design. See how the edge bevels reaching all the way from the ha to the mune with no flats in between? This tanto is twelve inches long and approximately two-hundred and fifty years old. Nothing but the finest for you, my dear.”

He placed the point of the tanto on her chest.

“Now you must not squirm so or I’ll miss my mark. I am going to plunge this into your heart. You will only feel pain for a second or two and then nothingness will fall upon you, that blessed destination we all secretly long for. Shhh, don’t carry on so. Now, where was I? Oh yes, there will be the initial cut, and then after you have left this world I will carve out a specific design for our Mr. Baker. I’m sure he will find it interesting.”

“I want to thank you again for assisting me, Nanci. You have been very gracious about this whole ordeal. Rest well my dear.”

I do not rub shoulders with evil very often, so writing about a character who is inherently evil was a stretch for me. I had to remember back to one of my favorite evil characters, Hannibal Lecter, for the inspiration. I wanted a character so chilling that my readers would actually have goose bumps while reading his words.

When you are writing about something you have little experience with, find inspiration from any source possible. Remember, too, that we all share certain vignettes from life. We have all seen horror movies. Tap into that and make it work for you.

Now sit down and write your masterpiece
Now sit down and write your masterpiece | Source

Final Thoughts

Here is the bottom line for you to consider: we will never improve as writers if we don’t stretch our limits. Get out of your comfort zone as soon as possible.

Robert Parker, an American novelist, wrote a series of novels about a private investigator named Spenser. I was a huge fan of that series for a number of years, but I began, ever so slowly, to become disappointed with the series. It seemed to me that Parker had found his comfort level, and that he really wasn’t stretching himself as a writer in his later years. That’s a purely subjective opinion, of course, but it serves as an example of the point I am making. Reach beyond what you are doing and discover what you are capable of doing.

2014 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

“Helping writers to spread their wings and fly.”

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    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      That's very kind of you, Brite-Ideas. As long as we never forget about emotions we'll be on the right track with our writing. Thank you for the visit.

    • Brite-Ideas profile image

      Barbara Tremblay Cipak 3 years ago from Toronto, Canada

      So true about tapping into emotions - the way you expressed the dark side had me reading every word, and let's face it, on the internet, that takes skill to get a reader to do that! When I write about music I'm always thinking 'emotions', 100 percent of the time, but the way you've expanded on it here has me thinking a little harder now. Thanks for that.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you dy0pxa

    • profile image

      dy0pxa 3 years ago

      Nice post.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I do, Deb, but unfortunately, or fortunately, I don't know of anyone like that. :) Thanks as always my friend.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 3 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      The dark side isn't hard to reach if you have someone to call on that already lives there. Know what I mean?

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Author Cheryl, keep teaching them that. If I had a universal complaint about the writing I see daily, it would be that. Catch me early or don't bother writing it. Thanks for sharing that.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Shyron, thank you so much. I love that you have a wringer in the garage. How cool is that? You just made my day young lady.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Rhonda! It's in my blood. What can I say? :)

    • Author Cheryl profile image

      Cheryl A Whitsett 3 years ago from Jacksonville, Fl

      Billy this is a great hub. I agree with that. I try to write some thought provoking hubs that keep the reader there until the end. I am one of those readers if you don't catch on the first page I probably won't go to the next. I have taught many authors that presentation is everything. Voted up and useful.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago from Texas

      Bill, you carried me away to a place to which I never wanted to return, brought back dark memories of fear and lonelyness in the ugly part of a city where there were bars on the windows, not to keep us in but to keep evil out.

      When my brothers, cousins and I lived with our grandparents whe did not have conveniences either. But that was not bad, except for the outhouse, and having to take a bath in a washtub. Everything else was good, at least as a child it was.

      We have a hand-cranked wringer in the garage for washing the car.

      Voted up UABI and shared.

    • Rhonda Lytle profile image

      Rhonda Lytle 3 years ago from Deep in the heart of Dixie

      I so enjoyed the snippets of fiction and they served as excellent examples. Thank you for always striving to help others be better. After all these years, you're still teaching :).

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Genna, thanks for sharing your thoughts on the serial killer. He is the most difficult character I have ever written, and I suppose that is a good thing. LOL

    • Genna East profile image

      Genna East 3 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

      I agree. And by the way, one of my stories has serial killer…he was sooo hard to write. (I’ll never do it again.) We can’t get into their sociopathic heads, so to speak; it’s impossible. We have to take a clinical approach and describe what he does and says from the perspective of a detached observer, and without emotion. It’s the only thing that works. Your use of a Hannibal-type character from which to draw upon was a smart approach.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Genna! I love watching King talk about writing. He knows his stuff, and he struggled just like all of us do...the voice of experience counts for so much, don't you think?

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you very much vkwok!

    • Genna East profile image

      Genna East 3 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

      I enjoyed your clips from “Finding Tobias” and “Shadows Kill.” Each brilliantly taps into the mood, emotion and that dark side you outlined so well. I also enjoyed the clip by the insanely prolific and talented Stephen King. I’m in that “Twilight Zone” quagmire of the long short story of 22-25k words long he refers to…so I found this segment very interesting.

      “Get out of your comfort zone as soon as possible.” So very true!

    • vkwok profile image

      Victor W. Kwok 3 years ago from Hawaii

      Thanks for sharing this lesson with us, Bill!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you breakfastpop...glad to be of assistance.

    • breakfastpop profile image

      breakfastpop 3 years ago

      You always inspire me, always. Voted up and awesome!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Very nicely said, Dianna. I can't imagine not testing the limits to find out how good you can really be.

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 3 years ago

      I love exploring and thinking of possibilities. Getting out of one's comfort zone can lead to creative writing. Another great lesson to absorb, Bill.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you tdalexander. I appreciate your kind words.

    • tdalexander profile image

      Toni Boucher 3 years ago

      Well written- refreshingly so. Thanks for sharing.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Donna, continue on my friend. I love to hear that your novels are going well. Thanks for taking the time to stop by.

    • cygnetbrown profile image

      Donna Brown 3 years ago from Alton, Missouri

      As usual, a lot of great information here, Bill! I'm currently finishing my most recent novel and am starting another! Your instructions are always welcome!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I've seen it quite often, Flourish, and I think it is a waste of talent and very sad.

      Thank you for sharing that...it illustrates this very well.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      I like your observation that sometimes writers (and everyone) can become too comfortable in what they do well. It happened with a college professor of mine who used to be brilliant. By the time I had him, he was living off his laurels and a pile of outdated notes. He really did not teach.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Suzie, you are a good friend...thank you! I don't know if I have a gift, but I do know I have a passion for words.

      Hope all is well my dear. I'm looking forward to your next hub.

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you very much, Frank. I hope you enjoy it greatly.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Faith....this is a fun book to write but also disturbing, and if the author finds it disturbing then it must be close to the target. Have a wonderful day my friend, and may blessings abound.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Maj! I wanted it to be uncomfortable, and evidently it is. I appreciate your thoughts...now good luck with that un-censoring.

    • Suzie HQ profile image

      Suzanne Ridgeway 3 years ago from Dublin, Ireland

      Hi Bill,

      Wow did I enjoy your excerpts from your novel and soon to be novel. Some seriously powerful, thought provoking words you penned. I found I was glued and didn't want them to end. You truly have a gift my friend and I am so honored to be your buddy. Look forward to having my own copies to read.

    • Frank Atanacio profile image

      Frank Atanacio 3 years ago from Shelton

      hey just ordered the Kindle addition to this title... i will read it within the next few days.. thank you wasn't so bad 4.99...

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Ohhh, I just love great thrillers, and you are writing one and off to a great start!!! Thank you, dear Bill, for reminding us to get out of our comfort zone and grow as writers.

      I found great satisfaction in writing out of my normal genre of writing when participating in dark challenges. So much fun and surprised that I was able to pull it off, it seems, at least from the commenting.

      I look forward to your next novel with great interest.

      Keep pushing those limits.

      Blessings always

    • travmaj profile image

      travmaj 3 years ago from australia

      Shadows Kill -a powerful excerpt - I'm such a coward. Oh my - Bill how is Bev sleeping these days? My big burning question which I guarantee you are not going to answer is - what happens next?

      Truly this made me realise that I censor myself when I'm writing (and probably when I'm not) Back to the drawing board or picture books! Thanks for the wring -Cheers Maj

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you, Ruby, and I think you did just fine leaving your comfort zone. Now build on it and move up the ladder. :)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you, Abby, and it's good to have you back among us. Best wishes for a brighter future.

    • always exploring profile image

      Ruby Jean Fuller 3 years ago from Southern Illinois

      Stretching, out of your comfort zone. I did that this week and had some nice comments, but i must say, i wasn't too sure it was good enough. Practice, i need to do that more. I enjoyed reading your dark words. Thank's again for all you do to help us along our journey....

    • Abby Campbell profile image

      Abby Campbell 3 years ago from Charlotte, North Carolina

      Hi Bill. First, let me say congrats on your book's publication. Woohoo! Your article is very helpful for us who write, and I appreciate you taking the time to teach us here. I hope you're doing well. I'm getting back to my hub writing after several months off. My mom had cancer, and I lost a couple of friends from this world. It was a rough time, but I'm now getting back to doing what I love. I hope to get back into reading more of your hubs. :-)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You are very welcome, Lea. I actually have a niece who is facing this same situation, and I've been coaching her through it. :)

    • Sparklea profile image

      Sparklea 3 years ago from Upstate New York

      OH I was SO hoping you would say you would include this in your mailbag! Because getting out of my comfort zone would mean writing some heavy stuff I have been through involving family...aka sharing my guts...and that would DEFINITELY make me uncomfortable. I attended a writing class at our community college last year and paid the teacher to critique some heavy stuff I wrote, and she loved it. So I am really struggling with coming out of my comfort zone. I would probably have to use a pen name if I did that and it went anywhere. THANK YOU. God bless. Sparklea

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Lea, I'm going to use your question in next week's mailbag, if you don't mind. Right now I'm not sure how I would answer it, but I have a few days to figure that out. Thank you, of course, for your kindness, and I would be pleased if you read my next novel....if I ever finish the darned thing. :)

      blessings always my friend

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Bill. I'm glad someone thinks that. :)

    • Sparklea profile image

      Sparklea 3 years ago from Upstate New York

      Billybuc, WOW, all I could do was put myself in the place of the victim...Terrifying for her! I LOVE thrillers, so I hope that if you need readers for your new book, that I can be included.

      This is a great hub, as always, you are an exceptional writer. Resurrecting Tobias is a work of genius.

      You offer great advice about getting out of your comfort zone. Does this mean that the writer does not need to take in consideration of how this may affect people close to them? I ask this because writer Susan Shapiro said in her workshop (which I attended) that "the minute you upset your family with what you have written, you will know you have found your voice."

      Thank you for another wonderful hub with very, very valuable information for writers. I am amazed how God has created millions of people who long to write and those who can pick a familiar topic, and write it with a totally different angle. THAT is the secret to success, and I learned this from you. God bless, Sparklea :)

    • DrBill-WmL-Smith profile image

      William Leverne Smith 3 years ago from Hollister, MO

      Loved the wringer washer example, up front. Great reminder. Keep at it. You are getting close to where you want to go... ;-)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you DJ! That's the kind of reaction I was hoping for. I want this guy to be dripping menace.

      and you are very welcome my friend

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, Tobias and I both thank you. I hope you enjoy it as much as I enjoyed writing it. :)

      I'm glad I'm not the only one who noticed some well-known authors losing their edge.

      Enjoy your evening my friend. It's raining here and feels quite lovely after the heat.

      bill

    • profile image

      DJ Anderson 3 years ago

      OMG! That was awesome! I have the hibbie jeebies just reading your

      excerpt. You may have to put a ES (Extra Scary) rating on that book.

      Or, possibly a disclaimer; "Not to be read alone, after dark!"

      Super hub.

      Thanks for all your help,

      DJ.

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 3 years ago from SW England

      Great passages and a great message. I too have revisited authors and been disappointed. We all need to stretch ourselves, even the famous!

      I remember the old washers and mangles from my grandmother's and mum's; how easy it is now!

      Getting on well with 'R T' now as I have lots more time; I'll let you know what I think!

      Have a great evening, bill!

      Ann

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Lifegate, and I hope you are having a wonderful day. How could you not in Pleasant Gap?

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Vellur..it wasn't easy but it was gratifying in the end.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      mdscoggins, best wishes with that novel. Be patient and let the characters tell the story.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Venkatachari....I feel I succeeded. :)

    • lifegate profile image

      William Kovacic 3 years ago from Pleasant Gap, PA

      Another good one, Bill.I enjoyed the videos as well. Voted up and shared.

    • Vellur profile image

      Nithya Venkat 3 years ago from Dubai

      Great hub, getting out of the comfort zone is a brave thing to do. Loved the way you have written the dark intense passage in your novel. Great write and voted up .

    • mdscoggins profile image

      Michelle Scoggins 3 years ago from Fresno, CA

      Thanks Billybuc for another inspirational piece of information. I will definitely look at stretching myself as I pour all I have into my current novel since I still feel quite green. Voted Up.

    • Venkatachari M profile image

      Venkatachari M 3 years ago from Hyderabad, India

      Very great work. The first example from Resurrecting Tobias is so lively a narration of the gloomy picture underlying behind the curtain of civilization. It greatly touches our senses and mind with a pinch. Voted very interesting and awesome work.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      And that, Pamela, is some powerful writing. Thank you for sharing that and for the kind words.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jamie, I know of no other way to grow my friend, and I applaud you for taking the risks. Thank you.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks for sharing that, Mark. How else will we know unless we stick our necks out to the public?

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Different strokes for different folks, Eric. :)

    • Pamela Bush profile image

      howtopam 3 years ago from Alberta, Canada

      Hi Bill;

      As I read through the excerpts of your works I was brought to the memory of a time long ago in a land where everything ominous was in reality tame as a lamb; a land where blood curdling screams of terror cried out from beneath the soles of my shoes covered in crimson colored mud. A place where one's primary focus was sheer survival while in a perpetual flee for life; certain death inevitable without escape in sight. Strangled in cold wet tangle of twisted pillow, sheet and blanket about to give up immediate salvation miraculously appeared as the eyes were opened with one final gasp for breath and a shrilling shout.

      Great ideas again Bill!

    • jhamann profile image

      Jamie Lee Hamann 3 years ago from Reno NV

      I agree about getting out of your comfort zones. I try new things here and there, hard things sometimes, sometimes I fail or sometimes it sounds pretty good, but I always learn something new. Jamie

    • Curiad profile image

      Mark G Weller 3 years ago from Lake Charles, LA.

      Great writing Bill, not only this article but your books as well! The passage from your new book is chilling to say the least.

      I have been doing the same thing with my music. I work on perfecting a song and then go out in a park filled with people and share it to see what kind of reactions I get. I have always ad that self doubt when singing or playing, but the feedback tells me it is good.

      Thank you for this article, it is great advice!

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 3 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      Hmmm, this could be a problem. My mom hand wrung the laundry after using a washboard and then hung it up. Perhaps I should upgrade my thinking.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Comfort, I think we all doubt ourselves. That's just who we are as writers. We stick our necks out daily with our writings....still, when we do stretch ourselves, and we see the results, it is all worth it. Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

    • ComfortB profile image

      Comfort Babatola 3 years ago from Bonaire, GA, USA

      Hello Bill! You are right about the 'getting out of ones comfort zone' to improve as writers.

      I really do get out of my comfort zone (literally speaking) to create the best of my writings. Though it usually takes a little bit more time, more research, and a lot more of doubting myself. But, the results always amazes me.

      Thanks for sharing another great write. Voted up, useful, and very interesting!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sha, I imagine it's like an actor getting in character for a new part....you just have to become that character and see life like he does....sometimes it isn't pleasant but it is necessary. Thank you.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Janine, the good writers always try to do something new and more challenging. I have no doubt about you. Happy Wednesday my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Brie, the search for an agent continues...thank you so very much. I'll let you know when I find one.

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 3 years ago from Central Florida

      It must take great effort to write outside of our comfort zone. I applaud you for taking such a major jump from your last two novels. I think if I wrote something gory I'd have to sleep with my lights on!

    • Janine Huldie profile image

      Janine Huldie 3 years ago from New York, New York

      I love your advice of seriously wring the most out of your writing and am right there with you int trying to do that as often as I can now. Thanks Bill and Happy Hump Day again!!

    • Brie Hoffman profile image

      Brie Hoffman 3 years ago from Manhattan

      YOU ARE NOT WASTING YOUR TIME AT ALL. I'm telling you, you are great. I hope you have a good agent (maybe you should go to NYC after-all, they have great agents there!)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Then I succeeded, Deb. Thank you!

    • DeborahNeyens profile image

      Deborah Neyens 3 years ago from Iowa

      Wow, Bill. That new novel you are working on is really dark. I did have goose bumps!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Brie, thank you so much. That means a lot to me. I wake up every day and wonder if I'm wasting my time and fooling myself...we all need affirmation. :)

    • Brie Hoffman profile image

      Brie Hoffman 3 years ago from Manhattan

      I don't vote up with "Awesome" very often but I did this time. I don't even like fiction and yet I enjoy your writing so much. You are a very talented man.