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Writing 101: How to Write a Dynamic First Paragraph

Updated on December 17, 2014

This Begins with a Question

From time to time I’ll receive a question in the Writer’s Mailbag that really deserves a more detailed response than I can give in the Mailbag. This is one of those times.

From Linda: “Perhaps this will find its way into your Monday writer's mailbox. How does one create the perfect first paragraph, or perhaps even the perfect first sentence in a novel. You need to grab your reader's attention at the very start.

Perhaps I have a short attention span, but I know that if I'm not hooked by the end of page 1 I give up and go on to another book. Life is too short to spend time reading something that doesn't rev your engine. “

Linda, your wish is my command!

Welcome to Writing 101
Welcome to Writing 101 | Source

The Ten Second Rule

Linda is absolutely correct in her statement that “life is too short to spend time reading something that doesn’t rev your engine.” I suspect most readers feel the same. I call it the Ten Second Rule.

If a writer does not capture the attention of his/her readers in the first ten seconds, chances are those readers will go elsewhere. You know this to be true. Simply look at your own habits when choosing a book to read. You either read the summation on the jacket flap, or you open to page one and read the first couple of paragraphs. When you’ve done either of those two things, you make a decision whether to read that book or put it back on the shelf.

So to say that the first paragraph is important would be a gross understatement.

I was reading my daily allotment of articles on HubPages the other day, and I came across an article on how to make meatloaf. The article began with this sentence:

“This article will explain how to make a delicious meatloaf.”

Well duh!

I’m told that in the title. Why did I need to read it again in the first sentence? Now I’m sure most of you are laughing right now, but I’m also sure that most of you read articles with introductions like that one almost daily.

It would be kinder if the author simply gave me some valium and let me sleep peacefully.

Which brings us to Linda’s question: how do we create the perfect first paragraph?

A Few Suggestions

Creative writing should be….well….creative. It should not be tranquilizing.

I’m going to toss a few suggestions at you and hopefully you’ll read something that helps when you start with your next essay/short story/ novel.

The first thing I want you to consider is that almost all of us share the five senses of sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell. Use that fact to your advantage. Call on commonalities we all share to capture the attention of your readers. In the example I mentioned earlier about a meatloaf article, I would have started by describing the smell of meatloaf as it bakes in the oven, or the heavenly taste of it as it rests on your tongue. Describe walking into the kitchen while the meatloaf is baking. If you do it properly, your readers will be able to experience it without being there and when that happens, you’ve got a winner.

Do I have your attention?
Do I have your attention? | Source

The Shock Treatment

My recently-published novel, “Resurrecting Tobias,” begins with this line:

“I once witnessed a stoning.”

I then go on, in the first three paragraphs, to describe the horrific scene my main character witnessed when he was a reporter in the Middle East.

I call that the Shock Treatment.

I wanted an introduction that grabbed my readers by their throats and would not let them go, and I think I succeeded. Just in case the first sentence didn’t do that, my main character followed up with this paragraph:

. “I was in Iran covering a political story and had just left the Shah’s palace. On my way to the hotel, I noticed a crowd forming in the public square. A woman, dressed in traditional Islamic hijab, was buried to her shoulders, and ten men stood about twenty feet away throwing stones at her. The stones were about the size of a football, or maybe slightly smaller, all with sharp edges. The woman had several cuts on her face by the time I arrived, and the pain was obvious, but she did not cry out. Stone after stone hit her head, and the cuts increased, and as time passed, her skull appeared, and then brain-matter, and her blood flowed down to the dust, turning it red under the scorching sun.”

The Shock Treatment!

Memories are powerful and we all share similar ones
Memories are powerful and we all share similar ones | Source

Thanks for the Memories

Remember when I mentioned earlier that we all share commonalities? Keep that in mind as you prepare to write an introduction. Is there a memory from your childhood that you can tell that will lead into your article? Is there a humorous event in your life that relates to the subject matter that you can share with your readers?

I truly believe that we are all unique, but I also believe we have experienced many of the same things. Writers should strive to call upon those shared experiences. Form a bond with your readers. Hit them on an emotional level that they can relate to. Once that bond is formed, I guarantee they will continue to read whatever it is you are writing.

Related to the Subject Matter but Slightly Removed

Now there is a confusing subtitle if I’ve ever seen one.

When I was teaching my students in creative writing classes, I would always tell them to find a way to introduce a topic without mentioning the topic. Let me give you an example to help you understand.

If I was going to write an essay on the horrors of war, what I definitely would not do is start off by telling you what the essay is about. I most likely wouldn’t start out with statistics or other facts because, quite frankly, statistics are usually boring. I would, though, start off something like this:

“Kinetic energy it is, a nice, tidy little name for a whole bunch of hurt. Take the bullet’s weight, factor in velocity, and toss in a pinch of gravitational trajectory, and we have some serious damage. As the bullet enters the human body, laceration and crushing wounds occur. Tissue and bone are punctured, anything in its path is crushed or pushed aside, and a cavity is formed, possibly thirty times wider than the bullet size. In less than a second after the bullet has entered, the cavity closes, but by then the damage to tissue, organs, and bones has been done, and we aren’t even talking about the shock waves that follow.

A 240-grain bullet (0.016 kg) travels 1,180 feet per second.

And then hits a body.”

Do you see how nicely that works as an attention-getter? Much better than statistics, don’t you think?

That’s the End of Today’s Lesson

What do all of these suggestions have in common?

Well, first of all, they are not boring. Secondly, they succeed in grabbing the attention of the readers, thus satisfying the Ten Second Rule.

Is this difficult to do? I’m not sure I would describe it as difficult, but it does take some work and practice, and it also takes a desire to rise to a new level in your writing. Writing is a craft, and like all crafts, it requires that hours be spent on improving.

I hope you found this helpful, and I look forward to seeing the results in your articles in the future.

2014 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

“Helping writers to spread their wings and fly.”

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    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you kalinin! I appreciate you stopping by.

    • kalinin1158 profile image

      Lana ZK 2 years ago from California

      Thank you for sharing your experience and your own first sentences/paragraphs - they're definitely attention grabbers, in the right way!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Deb, if you want to get the reader's attention, a difference of opinion or controversial statement will do it every time. :) Thanks for the visit. Now go visit your birds.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 2 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Hot sentences, and perhaps even a bit of the good old suggestion at differences of opinion to spur the thought processes, eh?

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I hope I always do, DDE! Thank you!

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 2 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Hi billybuc you always surprise with a helpful hub

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Glimmer, I like that you have some sort of plan to draw people in...a photo works fine. Thanks for sharing that idea.

    • Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

      Glimmer Twin Fan 2 years ago

      Well as you know I'm not writing a novel, but I am always trying to come up with a clever opening paragraph. It's not always easy with recipes and crafts. I try to draw folks in with my opening photo instead. Useful article Bill and Happy New Year to you and your family!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Dianna. I was just at the library and picked up a mystery by an unknown author because of the first sentence. He sold me in five seconds.

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 2 years ago

      I like the challenge you gave your students. It is an excellent way to teach creative writing. The first paragraph is so important in keeping a reader's interest for the rest of the article. Thanks for the lessons.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      vkwok, you excel at this. No need for you to listen to me. :) Merry Christmas my friend.

    • vkwok profile image

      Victor W. Kwok 2 years ago from Hawaii

      Thanks for the tips, Bill. Sometimes, beginnings can be really difficult to weave.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Denise, that's all it takes to grab attention. To keep it, however, takes a whole lot more. :) Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Manatita! Wishing you a dynamic weekend. :)

    • denise.w.anderson profile image

      Denise W Anderson 2 years ago from Bismarck, North Dakota

      Ten seconds, huh? That's all it takes? Love it!

    • manatita44 profile image

      manatita44 2 years ago from london

      Thanks Bill.

      All the good writers say this. It is essential to grab the reader almost straight away. Excellent Hub.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Pawpa...I always appreciate you stopping by.

    • Pawpawwrites profile image

      Jim 2 years ago from Kansas

      Very helpful information as usual. Capturing a person's attention in today's world is especially difficult. I'll keep this in mind.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Zulma, I think starting with dialogue is an effective way to begin, as long as it is interesting dialogue. :) Thanks as always and Happy Friday to you.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I'm glad you found this helpful, Nadine, and thank you for sharing it with your writing friends and authors. I appreciate it.

    • phoenix2327 profile image

      Zulma Burgos-Dudgeon 2 years ago from United Kingdom

      I like this hub. It's given me some good ideas for writing the intro. I tend to start with dialogue because, well, who doesn't eavesdrop now and then. lol.

    • Nadine May profile image

      Nadine May 2 years ago from Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa

      Again a great article to share amongst my writing friends and our authors.you have given me an idea about writing a marketing post using the first paragraph of my five novels . What the lessen for me was to start an article with a great paragraph. I will go over all my posts to see if i can do better and edit them. Thank you.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mary, based on that brief review, I don't see myself reading about Giles Goat Boy. LOL Thanks for the warning.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Doc! It's always nice having you stop by. Blessings to you during the holiday season.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Alicia! I hope they prove useful to you and others.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Michael my friend, it is a pleasure to read your comments. You brought a smile to my face this morning. Thank you for that gift.

      Blessings to you, this day and always

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You are very welcome, m abdullah javed

    • tillsontitan profile image

      Mary Craig 2 years ago from New York

      Smell, touch, taste....great way to start any sentence but especially a story or novel.

      Your perception spills over and we learn. There was actually only one book I couldn't read but I made myself read it anyway, "Giles Goat Boy" I swear that was the title but I can't tell you anything else about it.

      Voted up, useful, awesome, and interersting.

    • profile image

      lovedoctor926 2 years ago

      Thanks for sharing these helpful tips. I agree that the first paragraph is very important. Readers will often decide whether they want to keep reading a story or not. Your opening paragraphs always hook me in and makes me want to keep reading. vote up useful! Happy Holidays Bill.

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thanks for sharing the useful examples, Bill. They are certainly attention-grabbers!

    • Michael-Milec profile image

      Michael-Milec 2 years ago

      Good evening Bill.

      Willing not to leave you disappointed by endless , waiting while you are “ Looking forward to seeing results in your articles…” - let me practice as a disciplined pupil what you taught me in this extraordinary lesson for the beginners : “ Friends like us do always speak candidly . Imagine yourself knowing what your words meant to my hungry soul.

      Immediately as I was reaching for the dictionary searching right direction way out from this convoluted HP mysterious voyage the winds of presence compelling me not looking back… (Huh)

      See my friend all previous comment-ors have said more compliments to your helping us, leaving me without words to say more except to add my vote,

      Useful and Interesting.

      Blessings upon you and Good Night.

    • m abdullah javed profile image

      muhammad abdullah javed 2 years ago

      Thanks Bill Sir for the kind clarifications.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Rachael, it's just you!

      I couldn't resist. :)

      I can see how that would be a problem, and judging from many articles I have read on HP, it obviously is a problem for many writers. I think once a writer commits to adding factual information and, say, statistics, there is a very real danger of becoming "boring."

      I don't have a solution for you, but I do have empathy. That and four bucks will buy you a mocha, right?

      Thank you and best wishes.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sandra, that is high praise and I thank you. I love that kind of response from someone of your experience.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ahh, Bill, now you have it. Remember and do...a double whammy. :) Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      m abdullah javed, you raised valid questions. I think in the case of online articles, where views are all-important to many writers, the first ten seconds is crucial. I think in the case of novels, or non-fiction books, the first few chapters are crucial.

      Thank you for the holiday wishes, and the same to you, my friend.

    • RachaelOhalloran profile image

      Rachael O'Halloran 2 years ago from United States

      Because the title comes first before I start working on a HubPages article, their format has groomed me into putting serious thought to decide a title. It never used to be that way, but now it is, since I've been hanging out here more than anyplace else. I am not one of those writers who can write everything out in Word first before publishing it on this site because the Word screen remains blank for a very long time. I think better with the format in front of me, moving text capsules hither and yon.

      After deciding on my title, I probably spend too much time perfecting my opening sentences ... to the point of obsession. OK, you already know I have those kind of issues, so let's move on. lol

      What happens to my "stuff" is that it gets boring in the middle. Either I totally drop the ball, or I get bogged down in factual nonsense, or I have more than one tangent or sub-plot vying to overtake the work. I wonder if other writers run into that?? ...and please don't say - Rache, it is just you!

    • Sandra Eastman profile image

      Sandra Joy Eastman 2 years ago from Robbinsdale MN

      Your hubs are always unique and that is an under-statement. I've been writing for years yet continue to learn new things and tighten my writing by reading your material. Another home run for you. Thanks

    • DrBill-WmL-Smith profile image

      William Leverne Smith 2 years ago from Hollister, MO

      Always good advice. The real challenge it to both remember to do it, and, do it well. Thanks, as always! ;-)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you, Ruby. I'll have something that you can actually enjoy tomorrow.

    • always exploring profile image

      Ruby Jean Fuller 2 years ago from Southern Illinois

      I read your comment on Frank's hub about the first line and saw the effect too. Great info. Bill.

    • m abdullah javed profile image

      muhammad abdullah javed 2 years ago

      The ten second rule make us concerned about our approach towards writing something constructive and effective. Since the attention span is deemed as a shorter one what if it exceeds? Is it possible to alter the duration of rule? And how far, in case if someone leaves halfway because of lack of dynamic first para, the ten second rule succeeds in justifying if the overall message is good and a creative one?

      However the general idea what we get out of it is quite effective and helpful. Thank you so much for the inspiration Bill Sir. Wishing you and your family a Marry Christmas and a Happy New Year in advance.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I really appreciate that, Iris. Thank you so much.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      My pleasure, Brad. Just consider me Cheerleader Bill! :)

    • bradmasterOCcal profile image

      bradmasterOCcal 2 years ago from Orange County California

      billybuc

      Thanks for the pep talk, I appreciate it.

    • Iris Draak profile image

      Cristen Iris 2 years ago from Boise, Idaho

      The shock treatment is what got me to buy "Resurrecting Tobius". Great hook. Great book.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you very much, Deb. Either I'm full of b.s. or I still remember how to be a teacher. :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Marlene. Your words are music to my ears, because that is exactly what I try to do...so evidently I'm doing it. :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, I do love adjective for sure. I don't use nearly the number of adverbs as I once did since I read an interesting article by a well-known author who said adverbs are the tools of the lazy. LOL I am so impressionable. :)

    • DeborahNeyens profile image

      Deborah Neyens 2 years ago from Iowa

      I don't know how you do it. Your advice keeps getting better and better.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Brad, let me answer your question this way: I have yet to be bored to the point of not reading one of your articles, so you must be doing something correct. I have a very low tolerance for boredom and poor writing, and you've managed to keep me interested.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Linda, that is so kind of you. Thank you, and I hope to feel the air move soon as you start flapping your wings. :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Keep flapping, Ann, and prepare for liftoff!

      bill

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      Marlene Bertrand 2 years ago from Northern California, USA

      Bill, this is such a good lesson. I have to say that you are true to everything you say. When I read your novels, every word and every sentence is compelling and propelling. It's hard to put the book down because one sentence leads me to wanting to read the next. I know we're talking about beginnings here, but your endings... well, they are unpredictable, yet climactically satisfying.

    • Ann1Az2 profile image

      Ann1Az2 2 years ago from Orange, Texas

      This is a great reminder for all of us, Bill. I had an English Composition teacher tell us one time that a good way to start an opening sentence is with an adverb and you should avoid starting with "the," because, well, it's boring.

      The red horse galloped through the pasture.

      Suddenly, the red horse started at a gallop through the pasture.

      I love adverbs and adjectives, don't you?

    • bradmasterOCcal profile image

      bradmasterOCcal 2 years ago from Orange County California

      billybuc

      Mentioning the light at the other end of the tunnel gave rise to reader speculation as to the origin of the light. Some speculated that it was the sunlight bursting through from the other end of the tunnel. Yet, others thought that it was the light on the front of an approaching locomotive. I could have dispelled all of these incorrect guesses, if I had only mentioned that this tunnel was an old no longer functioning mine tunnel. In which case, the reader might have correctly speculated that it was a spotlight held by a curious prospector.

      Where did that paragraph hit in respect to the message contained in this hub? I believe that my hubs have been started by mentioning that White was the color of George Washington's White Charger. I have been starting with the intended Eureka of the Destination in my latest hubs so that the reader wouldn't get lost in the serpentine trail, as I wind the story to that destination.

      ??

      Thanks

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      Linda Lum 2 years ago from Washington State, USA

      I wish you could have been my Creative Writing teacher (but it would have been quite odd for a middle-aged women to be sitting amidst all of those teenagers).

      You've done more than simply answer my question. I'm really thinking (and I'll bet a great many in your audience are as well). I believe that all of us have a story that wants, NEEDS to come out. With your guidance I believe that we can spread our wings and fly.

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      Ann Carr 2 years ago from SW England

      Oh, bill, and there's me thinking I was beginning to fly! :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I agree, Michelle. Life is hectic for us all, so instant gratification is a must for writers. Thanks for sharing your thoughts and Happy Wednesday to you.

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, I saw it, but decided that you are, after all, only human. :)

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Good suggestion, russinserra. Opening with a comment or conversation can be very useful and effective. Thanks for sharing that.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I love it, Dora! I can see that little warning above the screen, reminding us that we only have ten seconds. Thanks for being here always.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mari, you are so right. Life is too short, so dazzle me quickly or get out of my way. :) Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Venkatachari M. I'm a teacher, and I love to pass on what I know. I'm glad it is well-received.

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      Michelle Scoggins 2 years ago from Fresno, CA

      Great tips Bill. If you don't catch the attention of your reader quick then you are wasting your time. I have found like Linda my attention span is really short and that is likely due to our fast pace world nowadays. Have a great week.

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      Ann Carr 2 years ago from SW England

      Of course we aren't! However, I've just noticed an unforgivable mistake in the second line of my comment which should of course read, 'many out there who don't understand'. Ooops!

      Ann :)

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      Russ Inserra 2 years ago from Indianapolis, In

      I often try to start with a short conversation or comment form someone.

      "That's a good look for you." I would hope someone would wan to find out what that was about.

      And don't forget the title. Especially on a site such as tgis one, I find myself choosing which hub to read by the title.

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      Dora Isaac Weithers 2 years ago from The Caribbean

      Another great lesson. I can remember several first lines of stories I have read. I guess that's also confirmation that they were good. I'm pinning Annart's warning.

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      dragonflycolor 2 years ago

      I'm the same way. I read the first few pages and if I'm not engulfed, then I'm gone! I have things to do!

    • Venkatachari M profile image

      Venkatachari M 2 years ago from Hyderabad, India

      Very awesome and wonderful coaching by you, Bill! It is quite pretty damn useful. That's why I like you so much, my friend. Have a nice day.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, I'm convinced there are some who would ignore that warning pinned on top of the screens. Some people, I'm afraid, are unteachable.

      But we aren't, are we? :)

      Thank you and Happy Wednesday to you, Ann.

      bill

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 2 years ago from SW England

      Great intro to the intro! Yes, we do have to spend hours on improving our craft and there are many out there that don't understand that concept.

      Lots of useful suggestions here; now no one has an excuse not to come up with an outstanding first para. We should all have a warning pinned at the top of our screens, 'Watch that first sentence!'

      Happy Wednesday, bill!

      Ann

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Pop...only one is for sale right now, and you can find it on Amazon http://www.amazon.com/Resurrecting-Tobias-William-... appreciate it, my friend.

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      breakfastpop 2 years ago

      You are a fabulous teacher, my friend. I have been very re-miss, I must confess. I want to buy your novels and I want them NOW! How do I go about that?

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      LOL...Bill, now if I could get paid for this, I would have the best of both worlds. :) Thanks my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      That's interesting, Sha. I've never been big on King but I do like Koontz....the only exception is "Storm of the Century" which I loved.

      Anyway, carry on and have a great day.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Eric, I think that is true for many writers. I know i learn best by reading the work of others.

      Thanks, buddy, and Happy Wednesday to you.

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      William Kovacic 2 years ago from Pleasant Gap, PA

      Thanks, Bill. I wonder why people sometimes take writing courses when you're just a click away. You're also much more practical.Thanks again, teacher!

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      Shauna L Bowling 2 years ago from Central Florida

      It's so true; the first paragraph will make or break a book, article, or any form of literature.

      I have one of Stephen King's Dark Tower books. I've never finished it. Even when I run out of things to read and try to pick it back up, I just can't get into it. It doesn't grab my attention. He fell out of my graces after that and Dean Koontz has taken his place.

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      Eric Dierker 2 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      Well now I sure learned a whole bunch about writing from the words you used. I mean that both ways. Just reading your hubs helps me become a better writer. And of course the lesson is very helpful.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you, Frank. Your article today is the perfect example of this lesson.

    • Frank Atanacio profile image

      Frank Atanacio 2 years ago from Shelton

      writing 101 is just that..writing 101 clear, and easy to take away what you need.. I love this line : Creative writing should be….well….creative. It should not be tranquilizing.... sometimes i feel the same way.. great little educational piece Professor BillyBuc....:) up and shared

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Janine, considering the fact that you write a blog, I think you do a very good job of this. I always enjoy your thoughts about your family, even though I know you will eventually sell a product, and that means you are doing something very right. :) Thanks dear friend.

    • Janine Huldie profile image

      Janine Huldie 2 years ago from New York, New York

      Bill, I totally took creative writing back in the day and I try so hard even when I write now to remember the first lesson I learned back then that the first topic sentence is truly crucial by reaching out pretty much grabbing your audience's attention from the get go. So, thank you for the reminder and a few more hints here on how to go about this. Definitely appreciate it. Hoping you are having a great morning so far now!