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Writing Tips for all Writers, Big and Small

Updated on June 3, 2014

I’m Trying to Include All of You

I have written a great many articles aimed at writers of books, but in truth that is a small percentage of the writers out there. Many writers just write short stories, or articles, and never once attempt to write a book or have any desire to do so.

So today I’m going to attempt to toss out a few tips that will help most writers, no matter what it is that you write.

As with all advice, some of these tips will work for you, and some will seem beyond silly and not worth your time or effort. That’s fine. My feelings won’t be hurt if you choose to ignore 90% of these. Use what you need and leave the rest for the next writer who comes along. And don’t feel bad about using one of these before the next guy, or gal, comes along. There is more than enough here for all of you.

Shall we begin?

Sit down and write!
Sit down and write! | Source

THE PERFECT TIME FOR WRITING DOES NOT EXIST

If you are serious about writing then you need to make time to write. There will always be distractions. Life does not stop simply because we have a passion for writing. Taking care of the kids, working a full-time job, visiting with friends, running errands, and of course eating and sleeping…..when in the world will we find time to write?

We will find time to write when we make time to write. Period! I have a dear online friend who gets up two hours early each morning to write. Before her job, before her other responsibilities, she crawls out of bed and puts pen to paper.

So must you!

CONTINUE TO ADD CHALLENGES FOR YOUR CHARACTERS

If you are writing a short story, then one challenge is enough to carry the story. If, however, you are writing a novella, or a novel, then one challenge is not enough. You must continue to challenge your main characters so that the story will flow smoothly and quickly.

The general rule of thumb is one challenge, or spark, for every 25,000 words.

SIMPLE IS OFTEN BETTER

Listen, I was a teacher for eighteen years, and I am in love with vocabulary. I was constantly harping on my students to use a thesaurus and to not be lazy in their word choice.

But…..

Using big words just for the sake of using big words is not the answer. You will not only bore your readers, and quite possibly confuse them, but you will ruin the flow of your writing. Large words are hard to read, so choose the time and place wisely. What’s more important, dazzling your readers with your vocabulary, or writing a story that reads easily?

Try describing this scene without the use of adjectives
Try describing this scene without the use of adjectives | Source

DO NOT USE ADVERBS OR ADJECTIVES AS CRUTCHES

Of course there is a time and place for adverbs and adjectives. I have nothing against either. They serve a purpose, and when used properly can be great additions to any sentence.

Having said that, I think many writers use them as a crutch instead of learning to write at a higher level.

Let me give you an example.

I can write…..”She was a beautiful woman”…..or, I can spend a couple sentences describing her beauty without once using the word “beautiful.”

Don’t take the easy way out when writing. It is beneath you.

RHYTHM COMES FROM WORD CHOICE AND SENTENCE LENGTH

Action can be attained through the use of shorter sentences and smaller words. If it reads quickly, it will give the impression of quickness in an action scene. Conversely, longer sentences and larger words tend to slow down the action and allow for some reflective passages.

Know what you are trying to achieve, and then use language to reach your goal.

TOSS CLICHES IN THE WASTEBASKET

As mindful as I am of this tip, I still find myself using clichés. I know better but still I do it. Why? Because clichés are a part of our daily speech. We all use them….that’s why they are called clichés.

So what’s wrong with using them, you ask? If we all use them in our daily conversations, why shouldn’t we use them in our writing?

Let me ask this question as an answer to that inquiry: do you want to be a follower, or a leader? Do you want your writing to be known for its originality, or do you want your writing described as mundane?

A short story should only have three or four characters
A short story should only have three or four characters | Source

THERE MUST BE “NEED” IN YOUR STORIES

To put it another way, there must not only be a need in your characters, but you must write so that your readers have a need to continue. If you do not develop a hunger in your readers for the next paragraph, you will soon find yourself without readers.

The average reader wants to be entertained. They want to be transported to an alternate reality, and for however long it takes to read your story, the reader wants to experience a different life. That is their need. It is your job to satisfy it.

DEVELOPING A WRITER’S VOICE IS A MATTER OF TIME AND EFFORT

I’ve been asked often how one develops a unique writer’s voice. The only answer I have for that is to write, and write often. There is no magical formula for developing your unique sound and style. It will come with time, but you have to make the effort by practicing your craft.

INTRODUCE CHARACTERS A LITTLE BIT AT A TIME

When I think about this writing tip, I automatically think of some espionage thrillers I have read. They take place in foreign lands, and the characters do not have names like Tom, Dick, or Harry, so they are immediately difficult for me to relate to. Then the author adds to my confusion by introducing twenty of these characters in the first three chapters.

Needless to say, I am one lost puppy by Chapter Four.

If you are writing a short story, and you only have three characters, then by all means, introduce them quickly. If you are writing a 100,000 word novel, take your time. Let the dust settle from the first five introductions before you toss in the next handful of characters.

BE TRUE TO YOUR VISION

I don’t know what your vision is. Do you?

Let me explain this to you by way of an example.

Doris loves to write, but she has no desire to write a novel. She just finds great enjoyment in writing her flash fiction….but….she keeps hearing about all these writers who feel it is necessary to write a novel, so she decides to do it. She labors long and hard following this path, but the longer she labors the less she enjoys it.

Writing needs to be pleasurable for the writer. Otherwise, why do it?

What do you want to gain from writing? Answer that question and then don’t let anything deter you. In the end, you are the one who needs to be satisfied by your results. Critics be damned….please yourself and stay true to yourself.

Were any of these tips helpful to you?

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That’s All for This Time

I hope these help you all. I want you excited about writing. I want your passion to shine through in your writing. I want you to look forward to your next writing adventure and certainly not dread it.

As I said before, take what you need and leave the rest. We work on a barter system here. I give to you, you give to others, and we all benefit when we read each other’s writing.

2014 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

“Helping writers to spread their wings and fly.”

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    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Glimmer, there are many reasons why I don't do recipes, but one of them is the reason you just gave....much too confining for a writer who likes creativity. Good point my friend.

    • Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

      Glimmer Twin Fan 3 years ago

      I'm really bad about using adverbs and adjectives too much. I know I am, but there are only so many ways one can say describe a recipe or a craft. I try to think up different ones and not repeat them over and over again. It's something I have been working on.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Rose! Very nice to see you.

    • randomcreative profile image

      Rose Clearfield 3 years ago from Milwaukee, Wisconsin

      These tips are so versatile! Great resource for any writer in need of a little inspiration.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Dianna, I didn't write when I was working full-time. I had to quit my job to find the time...so I understand what you are going through...best wishes and thank you.

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 3 years ago

      Bill, I am chuckling over your statement of truth: there is no perfect time for writing. I am learning that one quickly!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann my friend, so good to see you. I hope you are enjoying summer.

      I find my memory isn't quite as good as it once was. LOL Understatement of the year. So I must have a notebook or I am in deep trouble.

      So we carry on, eh? Do the best we can and all that. :)

      Have a wonderful weekend my friend.

      bill

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 3 years ago from SW England

      Advice that had me nodding and muttering agreement all the way through! It all sounds so easy, doesn't it? How I wish it was - no, not really because then it wouldn't be a challenge. What's the point if you don't have to twist your mind around each word.

      I find ideas come to me so often when I'm out and about; I have to take notes or I've lost those ideas, never again to retrieve them from the recesses of my pea-brain. Fortunately, I've not yet experienced having a great idea in the middle of the night as my father did - he wrote it down, went back to sleep with no worries, then in the morning found that he'd written gobbledy-gook! Mind you, he wrote wonderful things when he was awake.

      We all have our forte; let's celebrate it as often as possible! Ann

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Super, Joe! Good luck with that book and thanks for the visit.

    • joedolphin88 profile image

      Joe 3 years ago from north miami FL

      Wonderful writing tips, I have always had a passion for writing but really couldn't see it being my job. I've been working on a book for a little while but it needs some editing and formatting. I love the tips you have offered and will implement them in future writings of mine.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I agree, Deb. If I am lost right at the beginning and have to go re-read a section, then there is no reason for me to continue. Thanks for mentioning that.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 3 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Great advice, as always. I have read those books with umpteen characters right out of the starting gate. When I have to reread what I just read, that is more of a bore than an interest, so I can sympathize.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Oh, Mary, if I only had the time. I'm trying, but this latest novel has all my attention. Thanks for the gentle kick in the behind. :)

    • tillsontitan profile image

      Mary Craig 3 years ago from New York

      I think I'm in the same boat as Doris ;). I do so love writing but not sure the novel has grown big enough to come out yet.

      Speaking of books, you are going to join these hubs and publish them in a book for budding writers, right?

      Voted up, useful, and interesting.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Not this reader, Flourish, or I'll leave in a heartbeat. :) Thank you!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      I like your tip about introducing characters a little at a time. Don't make the reader work too hard.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I appreciate it, Frank. Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Jamie. I appreciate you stopping by.

    • Frank Atanacio profile image

      Frank Atanacio 3 years ago from Shelton

      hi read your useful tips and forgot to comment.. thank you for this once again timely writing tips :)

    • jhamann profile image

      Jamie Lee Hamann 3 years ago from Reno NV

      Great tips Bill thank you. Jamie

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you vkwok!

    • vkwok profile image

      Victor W. Kwok 3 years ago from Hawaii

      Thanks for the great tips, Bill!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Heidi, you always leave me smiling. Yes, beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and thus means different things to different people...unless the writer removes all doubt. :) Thank you and have a brilliant weekend.

    • heidithorne profile image

      Heidi Thorne 3 years ago from Chicago Area

      There truly is no perfect time to write... although I find I have to schedule time so that all kinds of other stuff doesn't steal that precious time away from me.

      And definitely say no to vague adjectives and adverbs! "Beautiful" is in the eye of the beholder (although that's a cliché, I know).

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      breakfastpop, I'm glad you liked it. Have a great day, and thank you.

    • breakfastpop profile image

      breakfastpop 3 years ago

      You have just created a writer's bible. Thanks... Voted up, useful, interesting and awesome.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Michael my friend, I smiled throughout your comment. I will gladly barter with you under those conditions. You give me so much more than writing ever could.

      Have a wonderful and blessed week my friend

      bill

    • Lady Guinevere profile image

      Debra Allen 3 years ago from West By God

      Wow such long comments. I love to write and yes there is no specific time that I prefer. I was told that I should write a book, but I am not sure what I would write on that would take that many words or hold a reader for that long.....yet. I am still learning though. I have been learning for years. I write like I am talking right to you and you are sitting in the chair across from me. Thanks for all these tips and all your hubs about writing. I do read them and whenever I get ready to write a book then I will remember to read your articles.

    • Michael-Milec profile image

      Michael-Milec 3 years ago

      Hello Bill.

      After this article even 'none-attributed' person would get desire to get into writing. All tips you're giving here are clear clues to successful try -to fly. You have put me under impression that my portion here on FB is commenting only since my contribution is disclosing my general inadequacy, out of which you get the ideas to encourage "michael.' Thanks, I needed especially this one . One of the between the lines you're suggesting to me to have " special' time for writing; as if in illusion that with increasing of age no one is given extra hour or two a day. So taking time for writing is my urgent need. Before that happens I need dot be delivered from the 'addiction' of physical work (productive work ) often more the just full shift . Soon after that even my body gets tired, so tired that my brain refuses cooperate… Besides there is so much for me to learn about many other technicalities of this particular program. . . gradually though I am coming across certain details revealed in many other articles , questions and answers…

      This would cower a barter system here, in which "you give to me "- giving goes on generously by many while my giving isn't there yet.

      May you be ever blessed for this awesome article.

      Good night my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You are welcome, Ruby. As always, you made me smile. Thank you for that.

    • always exploring profile image

      Ruby Jean Fuller 3 years ago from Southern Illinois

      Now this was great. I didn't leave any of it, i hope to use it all. I love to write and i do want to be a better writer of fiction. Thank you...

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sheila, if you write crime novels, I'm quite sure you are already doing this. A good mystery novelist, which I know you are, does this instinctively. Keep up the good work my friend, and thank you.

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      sheilamyers 3 years ago

      Great advice as always. The one new to me is to add spark every 25000 words. Since I write crime novels and they're always finding new clues, I'm sure I manage to incorporate this bit of advice, but I'll have to look more closely now and make sure it's getting done. Thanks.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Dr. Bill, I need reminders just like everyone else. That's one reason I write these, to keep myself on track. Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Good for you, Denise! It is so important that we enjoy what we are doing. If not, why do it? Thank you!

    • DrBill-WmL-Smith profile image

      William Leverne Smith 3 years ago from Hollister, MO

      Certainly there were "more than one" good tips in there, for me. Not that I hadn't heard them, before, but such good reminders. And, I do need the reminders - is that becoming a cliché? Thanks, again! ;-)

    • denise.w.anderson profile image

      Denise W Anderson 3 years ago from Bismarck, North Dakota

      The part about finding pleasure in writing, and writing to please myself and not others, now that is what I needed to hear! I have found that if I don't enjoy it, I tend to not do it.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Blond, if you write with passion and enthusiasm, then in my book, you are a writer. Be proud of that and keep writing. I happen to think you are very good.

      Thank you for your thoughts and keep those cliches coming. :)

    • Blond Logic profile image

      Mary Wickison 3 years ago from Brazil

      Bill, that is just what I needed to read today. I feel like I am not a writer if I don't have a published book to my credit. If someone asks me, "What do you write?" I almost sound like I am apologizing for only writing online.

      Clichés, I love, sorry. Having lived in The States and Britain I have one for almost every occasion. In fact now that I am learning Portuguese, it has given me even a greater love of them. I love trying to explain their meaning to a non-native English speaker. Sometimes they just suit the occasion. I will say I do try to use obscure ones though.

      I will work on this area, as one doesn't want to be considered writing below one's station.

      Very useful hub .

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      There is much to learn, Melissa, and it begins by writing. :) I trust you are doing that????

      Thank you and Happy Summer to Minnesota!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      DJ, I've never been accused of being a plethora before. LOL I love it! Thank you dear friend.

      bill

    • mpropp profile image

      Melissa Propp 3 years ago from Minnesota

      These are wonderful tips for all writers, Bill. Thanks as always for sharing your knowledge with us! There is so much to learn...

    • profile image

      DJ Anderson 3 years ago

      Bill, you are a walking plethora of great tips on writing.

      I had never thought of making short sentences to evoke the feeling of

      rushing through a scene. Ingenious!

      I am so glad to see your article. And, glad to see the familiar icons of

      faces.

      Great information, as always.

      Thank you,

      DJ.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      A lovely compliment, Ann, and I thank you for it. I hope you are well and writing your arm off today. :)

    • Ann1Az2 profile image

      Ann1Az2 3 years ago from Orange, Texas

      As usual, you took a complicated talent like writing and made it smooth as molasses, my friend. And that just shows how well you know writing, of course. They are great tips, though and I will use them in the future.

      Thank you for sharing your talent, as always!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Eric, I'd go with Omphaloskepsis! Works every time. :) Thanks buddy!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Abbaelijah, I appreciate you stopping by.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you DDE!

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 3 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      Bill, how can you self examine whether or not your words are too fancy pantsy. Should you just go with your gut? "examining ones belly button" -- can we use "naval" or even go all the way with "Omphaloskepsis"?

    • abbaelijah profile image

      Abba Elijah aka elijagod 3 years ago from Nigeria

      Thanks for all the tips about writing,

      voted up !

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      A helpful hub and so much of thought put into this hub.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I'm glad to hear it, Alicia. Thank you!

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      Linda Crampton 3 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      I appreciate all the writing tips that you share, Bill. You are creating a huge collection of helpful articles for writers!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jo, there have been a few glitches in the publishing end of things, but we should have it ready for sale in a week at the latest. Thanks for asking. I am well my friend; busy but well.

      And I hope this finds you well too.

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Suzette. Information is worthless unless you share it. At least, that's what I was taught long ago.

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      Jo Alexis-Hagues 3 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

      Bill, this is good practical advice, useful for writers big and small, you are generous and inspiring as always. I hope all is well, I haven't been around much lately, is Resurrecting Tobias in the shop yet? I Googled the title but could only find various extracts, let us know when it comes out. Take care my friend, and my best as always.

    • suzettenaples profile image

      Suzette Walker 3 years ago from Taos, NM

      Another article of great advice, suggestions and tips. Your well just never runs dry. You are amazingly helpful. Thanks for sharing with us today.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Dora, a good book is one the reader does not want to put down...the reader has a need to continue. If you write that book, people will want it badly. :) Thank you so much.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Lea, I just finished it. I'll post it this week or first thing next week. :) Thanks for the idea my friend.

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      Sparklea 3 years ago from Upstate New York

      Oh, that is great! Can't wait to see what you have come up with! Blessings, Sparklea :)

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      Dora Isaac Weithers 3 years ago from The Caribbean

      Great tips for big and small. What I'm taking from this one is: creating a need for readers to continue. They are all very helpful reminders. Thank you.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      My pleasure, Marlene. The fact is that a majority of writers never write a novel...so this one is for them. Thank you as always.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      All is well, Jamie. Thanks, and good luck with those chickens.

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      Marlene Bertrand 3 years ago from Northern California, USA

      Such good advice. There is so much pressure to write that next great epic novel that it can cause writers of other genres to feel somewhat less of a writer when they prefer to write short stories, how-to books, or whatever they prefer to write. Thank you for your attention to the "little" people.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Frank, I'm glad it helped. Hopefully it was a gentle mule kick. Thanks my friend.

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      Jamie Lee Hamann 3 years ago from Reno NV

      Thank you for the good advice Bill, I am currently working on an ongoing chicken project now that we got the chicks in a home. I hope all is well. Jamie

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      Frank Atanacio 3 years ago from Shelton

      Ive been having a writing drought, but this was the mule kick in the head I needed.. I followed no method.. but you timed this hub just right .. packed with easily achievable information that can be used as a tool or what makes writing work..thank you for the share Frank...

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Liz, that is very kind of you to say. Thank you very much. It is on my to do list, but that list doesn't seem to get any shorter with time. :)

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      Elizabeth Parker 3 years ago from Las Vegas, NV

      Bill, I do hope that you take these ideas and oodles and advice and write a book on well, WRITING, one day. I've read books on writing before and while some had some decent advice, you add personal flair and experiences in your advice to make it educational and entertaining... and I think it would be so helpful to other aspiring authors! Just my two cents. As you can tell, I enjoyed this hub. :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      That's great, Sha. Maybe it will lead to something bigger. Good luck with that. It's about time you experience some good luck.

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      Shauna L Bowling 3 years ago from Central Florida

      Great tips as always, Bill. I just landed an assignment writing five 200 word articles for Orbitz (promoting Best Western hotels). I'm finding it a tad difficult to get my rhythm going. I'm used to writing fiction or my HP articles or doing re-writes (which is on hold until I finish this better-paying assignment). It's crazy how out of whack you can get when you've stepped away from a certain type of writing for a while. So, as you say: write, write, write and write some more!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Lea, I was in a hurry when I wrote this; thus, I didn't accept my own challenge to write two sentences describing the beautiful woman. You just gave me an idea for another article, though, so thank you. Your request will be answered in the next week or so.

      I hope you are well my friend. The weather is gorgeous here, making it hard for me to concentrate on things that must be finished. :)

      blessings always

      bill

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      lifegate, I think it is a hiccup in HP...I didn't get any notifications yesterday. Hopefully they will work it out soon. Thanks for finding this.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Artois, the time changes for each of us, so if early morning works for you then do it. I am worthless after noon; before noon, I am a ball of fire. :) Thanks for the visit.

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      William Kovacic 3 years ago from Pleasant Gap, PA

      Glad I found this. For some reason, I've not been getting any notifications. Think what I would have missed if I didn't do some searching. Thanks for all your wonderful tips.

    • Artois52 profile image

      Artois52 3 years ago from England

      Great hub, thanks for sharing your tips. I'm not sure I agree about the time for writing though. Early mornings is always the best time for me, for some reason. Don't know why, that's just when I have the most enthusiasm for it!

    • Sparklea profile image

      Sparklea 3 years ago from Upstate New York

      Billybuc: Voted up and awesome...More excellent advice from a wonderful person and a great writer.

      Making time to write is the key. I am at my desk as soon as I return from my morning walk. If I don't do it then, no words get written that day.

      I am so on board with not using long words. I can't stand it when I have to look up the meaning of a word in the middle of reading a book.

      Years ago I bought a book about coincidences...which I LOVE the topic...and the author kept using words I never heard of, which I found to be very aggravating. When I looked each one up, they were SIMPLE meanings and she could have used other words for the sake of the reader.

      (I HATE the word plethora, by the way...that's one example...even though I know the meaning)

      Writing so that the reader has a need to continue is the best advice...I think most people have read at least one book where it starts out great, then bogs down. For example, my sister loathed the book The Shack, said she would not even finish it as it started out great then, as she put it, got confusing for her.

      Great advice on being true to your vision.

      Please keep these hubs coming, you have, in itself, created a book about writing through your hubs...which I hope you put them altogether and publish some day.

      Blessings, Sparklea PS: You used "she was a beautiful woman" as an example...would love for you to write two sentences describing her without using the word, 'beautiful'...I was dying to see an addition to the example.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jo, taking breaks from a book is a great idea. I do it as well. We all hit those walls at times. Thanks for your thoughts, and blessings to you always.

    • Jo_Goldsmith11 profile image

      Jo_Goldsmith11 3 years ago

      Some more great tips Bill! Your series has been so very helpful as I continue to complete the novel I am writing. I find that when I get a little stressed with where the character is going. I will allow myself a short break and return when I feel better. Appreciate you so much! Shared and Up for interesting, useful and sooo awesome! :-)

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mari, you are welcome. Have a great day and thank you.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Nell, I can't seem to break the habit of cliches, but I'm trying very hard. :) Thank you!

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      dragonflycolor 3 years ago

      As always, very helpful tools and tips here, Bill. Thanks so much!

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      Nell Rose 3 years ago from England

      Hi Bill, love your advice, I did smile when you said about cliche's purely because I always say life is a cliche' so why not use them? lol! Great advice as always, voted up and shared, nell

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Good morning Janine. Good to see you this sunny morning. Thank you dear friend and have a profitable day.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Trisha, it's always nice to have someone agree with me. LOL I have read some books where ten characters were introduced in the first two chapters and honest to God, I am lost twenty pages into the book. Not good!

      Thank you for your kind words.

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      Janine Huldie 3 years ago from New York, New York

      Always do love your writing tips and definitely said so much here that really resonates with me as a writer myself. Thanks Bill and totally wishing you a great day ahead now!

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      Trisha Roberts 3 years ago from Rensselaer, New York

      Great Article and very beneficial. I completely agree with you that there is no special time to write, and you definitely have to make the time for it. I also agree with introducing characters a little at a time. I understand you want your readers to keep reading, and if you introduce to many at once, it may overwhelm them too. Absolutely loved this Article and again, Thank You!