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The Architecture Of The Arkansas Ozarks

Updated on May 13, 2013

The Architecture of the Arkansas Ozarks

This is hands-down in my top five favorite books of all time. I recieved it as a gift, saw the title, and thought "What the heck? I don't know much about architecture, or Arkansas for that matter." But I read it anyway and I'm so glad I did.

From the cover: "Jacob and Noah Ingledew trudge 600 miles from their native Tennessee to found Stay More, a small town nestled in a narrow valley that winds among the Arkansas Ozarks and into the reader's imagination. The Ingledew saga - which follows six generations of 'Stay Morons' through 140 years of abundant living and prodigal loving - is the heart of Harington's jubilant, picaresque novel. Praised as one of the year's ten best novels by the American Library Association when first published, this tale continues to captivate readers with its winning fusion of lyricism and comedy. "

The Architecture Of The Arkansas Ozarks

Utterly un-put-down-able. Americana at it's core.

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Love it! Great read.

Love it! Great read.

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    Sorry, not my cup of tea.

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      The best line ever!

      This stuff was just as capable of reducing the world to half its size, but it also reduced time to half its length which was terribly confusing to Isaac, who in compensation for it began to double everything: each day was forty-eight hours in length, or rather Monday came twice a week, and the Second Tuesday of the Month was also the Third; spring and summer came twice a year, and so did autumn, which wasn't so bad, but two winters in one year was awful.

      More books by Donald Harington - Vote for your favorites, or add any I missed.

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      Let Us Build Us a City: Eleven Lost Towns

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      The Architecture of the Arkansas Ozarks
      The Architecture of the Arkansas Ozarks

      Jacob and Noah Ingledew trudge 600 miles from their native Tennessee to found Stay More, a small town nestled in a narrow valley that winds among the Arkansas Ozarks and into the reader's imagination. The Ingledew saga - which follows six generations of 'Stay Morons' through 140 years of abundant living and prodigal loving - is the heart of Harington's jubilant, picaresque novel. Praised as one of the year's ten best novels by the American Library Association when first published, this tale continues to captivate readers with its winning fusion of lyricism and comedy.

       
      Some Other Place. The Right Place
      Some Other Place. The Right Place

      It is June. Diana Stoving's new Porsche has just broken down on the Garden State Parkway, and Diana, twenty-one, freshly graduated from Sarah Lawrence, sits in a dealer's showroom, waiting for repairs. Bored and impatient, Diana leafs through the local newspaper - and by pure chance reads the news item that will change the course of her life, that will launch her on a year's journey, a year of the strangest adventures she could ever hope to endure, suffer and enjoy. For it is this news item that leads her to meet Day Whittacker, a shy, eighteen-year-old Eagle Scout, who his high school English teacher, experimenting with 'age regression' claims is the reincarnation of a hellraising ocntryman named Daniel Lyam Montross, a man who had lived a wild, romantic life and died a violent death - twenty years earlier. Together, Day and Diana disappear from New Jersey, setting out to explore the life and investigate the death of the man known as Daniel Lyam Montross. Through ghost towns and abandoned villages they journey, becoming in turn, amateur archaelogists, naturalists, sleuthss, historians, and inevitably and ultimately, lovers. And always the presence of Daniel Lyam Montross is with them. Dead, he is fated to die again. Is one or both of them also fated to die? One of Harington's most devious narratives, and a precursor to the Stay More cycle.

       
      Enduring (Stay More series)
      Enduring (Stay More series)

      Forty years ago, Donald Harington created a little town of Stay More, hidden away in the hills of the Ozarks. He populated it with generations of families that had escaped the Appalachians in serach of more room, greener pastures, freedom from convention, sweeter air and water, or, simply, a world where time and history don't matter. In Enduring, Harington continues the themes of the Stay More series and reveals, for the first time, the mysteries of the life of Latha Bourne, the heroine and demigoddess of Lightning Bug, The Choiring of the Trees, and other Harington classics, who is set apart from her fellow Stay Morons, as Harington affectionately calls them, by her beauty, wit, mystery and intense, unfulfilled sexuality.