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Design a Bird Garden

Updated on July 8, 2014

Design a Bird Garden

Attracting birds to your back or front yard can be as simple as putting in a bird feeder; or you could add a bird house or two and a bath. As long as you are prepared to change the water in the bath and keep the feeder stocked with whatever seeds the birds you are attracting require you will have visitors all year round.

Bird feeders, baths and houses are all easy enough to install and can be home made or bought. They do make great gifts if there is a bird fan in your family. However, you can take attracting birds to another level and create habitat that appeals to our flying friends.


Know your Birds

It is not all that difficult to design a bird garden. Start with a little research; what birds are native to your region and what migratory bids will drop by, perhaps only for a short visit during the spring and summer. A trip to your local public library can be useful.

Once you know who your visitors are likely to be, then you can start your design by selecting plants that appeal to them. This is similar to accepting guests in your home, you want them to feel comfortable, but unlike your human guests you want the birds to hang around as long as possible.

It is not necessary to convert your whole yard into a bird sanctuary, although if that is what you want to do, enjoy. You can have your home vegetable garden, cutflowers herbs and still create an area that is for the birds.

A bird garden will provide food and shelter as well as a look out point, exactly what plants will do the job depends upon where you live. However, regardless of your location, tall and medium size shrubs can provide a nesting place and a food source for many species. An herbaceous ground cover can provide a fine habitat for species, which prefer to feed on the ground. They are among the most vulnerable of birds because they are easier prey than birds up in a tree or on a feeder, so give them some protection.

Plant Choices

Use plants that are native to your area when designing your bird garden. Native plants are adapted to the growing conditions in yoru area and birds and other beings have been using them for shelter and to find food for many generations so the plants and the birds are well matched.

Using native plants not only attracts birds but also helps preserve the natural habitat of yoru region so you are helping to preserve regional bio-diversity when you sue native plants.

If you have only a small space to set aside for the birds that is fine, two or three shrubs, a few wildflowers and some low growing herbs can be all you need, as long as you do your homework first and match the plants to the birds.

sparrow

courtesy gmnonic/flickr
courtesy gmnonic/flickr

Comments

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  • Bob Ewing profile imageAUTHOR

    Bob Ewing 

    8 years ago from New Brunswick

    Thanks, and thanks for dropping by.

  • profile image

    brtaiwo 

    8 years ago

    I like your style of writing.

  • Bob Ewing profile imageAUTHOR

    Bob Ewing 

    8 years ago from New Brunswick

    my pleasure and thanks for dropping by.

  • Varenya profile image

    Varenya 

    8 years ago

    Nice ideas, thanks for having shared them! I completely agree: the forest must be the model for our gardens.

  • Bob Ewing profile imageAUTHOR

    Bob Ewing 

    8 years ago from New Brunswick

    You are welcome, thank you for dropping by.

  • Hello, hello, profile image

    Hello, hello, 

    8 years ago from London, UK

    Thank you for giving such great ideas.

  • Bob Ewing profile imageAUTHOR

    Bob Ewing 

    8 years ago from New Brunswick

    The forest is a great model for our yards, thanks for dropping by.

  • profile image

    Jeanne Grunert 

    8 years ago

    Nice hub Bob! It's also great to grow an organic garden. When you have an organic garden, it keeps the nasty pesticides away that can harm birds and insects. Our 17 acre farm is entirely organic and I've never seen such a great bird population; we've left mixed hardwoods, the timber crop, and some bird gardens such as you suggest mixed together for a more natural habitat and they love it.

  • Bob Ewing profile imageAUTHOR

    Bob Ewing 

    8 years ago from New Brunswick

    Glad it helped, Happy Birding.

  • starme77 profile image

    starme77 

    8 years ago

    This is Awesome! I feed the birds every morning and love to watch them , this hub has some great info and ideas for me here! Nice :)

  • Bob Ewing profile imageAUTHOR

    Bob Ewing 

    8 years ago from New Brunswick

    Your point about the birds becoming dependent is important, thanks for dropping by.

  • Pamela99 profile image

    Pamela Oglesby 

    8 years ago from Sunny Florida

    I think this is a great idea. We have been feeding the birds year round for some years, have a bird bath and try to plant flowers that attract humming birds and butterflies. We are rewarded for our efforts. During the winter many birds stay in our area, so it is important to keep the bird feeder full as we get a fairly large volume and they depend on you.

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