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Does Your Home Have Dirty Air?

Updated on October 04, 2016
Marcy Goodfleisch profile image

Marcy lives in Austin, Texas and has written about environmental issues and conservation for more than a decade.

Indoor Air Quality is Important for Your Health

These tips will help you improve the quality of air in your home.
These tips will help you improve the quality of air in your home. | Source

Your House Could be Making you Sick!

Even if you clean regularly, dust your furniture like crazy and change air filters almost as often as you change your shoes, the air in your home can potentially harm your health.

Here are some tips on what to look for, how to address problem pollutants, and how to protect your home from poor-quality air.

First, take an inventory of the daily habits of everyone in your house. Many improvements can be made with some simple steps in your daily life.

Shower stalls and tub enclosures breed mold

Wiping down shower walls helps control harmful mold.
Wiping down shower walls helps control harmful mold. | Source

Bathroom Mold Can Make You Sick

Bathrooms are a breeding ground for mold spores. With regular doses of hot, humid air and a general lack of outdoor ventilation in most homes, mold can happily set up residence in your shower stall, tub enclosure and other moist areas.

But, of course, we need our daily showers and baths. If you're battling mold in your bathrooms, here are some simple steps to help prevent and control the problem. Train everyone in the family to do these things, and you'll see a difference!

  • Use the Vent Fans! Those fans are not just to get rid of extra heat or, um, a few uncomfortable odors. They will draw out the steam and moisture that feeds mold spores and help prevent them from reproducing.
  • Wipe Down Shower and Tub Enclosures: It takes just a few seconds to wipe off those droplets of warm moisture after you take a shower or a bath. Squeegees are a great device to make the task even easier. Use an old bath towel to soak up standing water in stalls that don't drain well (and then wash it regularly).
  • Clean Bathroom Vents: Over the years, those vents absorb a lot of dust and moist air, which creates a perfect place for mold to thrive. Periodically, remove the vents and take them outside, vacuum them and then wash them in warm sudsy water with a touch of bleach. While they're drying (an important step in doing this properly), vacuum out the vent area, making sure to dislodge any noticeable chunks of dust and suck them into the hose. Wear a mask for this stage, and cover your eyes if you have allergies. Be sure the vents are dry before reinstalling them.

According to lung specialists, mold not only causes asthma, it irritates the nose and eyes. In general, unless you're eating a luscious slice of brie or getting a dose of penicillin or something, mold is not our friend.

Yikes! Can't breathe!

Paint and other fumes are caustic to your lungs.
Paint and other fumes are caustic to your lungs. | Source

How to Avoid Harmful Fumes from Chemicals

Another huge source of irritation to lungs and eyes are fumes that can come from craft products, furniture polish and cleaning fluids.

If you enjoy crafts, be sure you're in a ventilated area if you use paint, stains, varnish or another substance that has a chemical base.

Similarly, never refinished furniture in an unventilated area - open your garage door if that's your preferred spot, and install a good vent if you use a basement.

Use painters' masks to protect your lungs, and consider removing your clothing before you return to the main area of the house (okay, you can shut the garage door first so you don't entertain the neighbors). Let the clothing air out a bit before bringing it through the house to the laundry area; fumes evaporate, and this way they'll evaporate away from the living areas.

Choose 'green' cleaning products wherever possible to avoid harmful chemicals and cleaning compounds. You can get very good results with products that are far less harmful to your eyes, nose and lungs.

Clean your Ductwork

Your home's ducts (if you live in a place with central heating and air) can build up dust over long periods of time. And mold loves to set up residence in dusty areas, especially if there's also a bit of moisture to add to the attraction.

If you're handy around the house, you can clean your ductwork yourself. If that's not your style, check for a reputable duct cleaning company in your area and look for any local reviews about their services. You can also check with your neighbors to for recommendations, which helps you know what type of service works best in your climate and for the construction of your home.

Not all ducts are created equal - some are sturdier than others (and hold up better to the type of cleaning that uses a brush on an extension rod). Some are more fragile and might hold up better with suction methods that don't send brushes deep into your system. Some firms use steam cleaning, but you'll need to determine if this is a good option for your climate and home.

This inexpensive carbon monoxide detector can save your life!

Seal Fireplaces for Cleaner Air

Carbon monoxide is a silent killer and can creep into your home through fireplaces that aren't properly sealed or vented. Even a non-lethal amount can cause headaches and other ailments.

You can install alarms that will alert you if there are harmful levels of carbon monoxide in your home. These alarms, as with smoke alarms, can be life-saving in the event of a problem that can leave you breathless.

The Environmental Protection Agency offers a wealth of tips on monitoring and improving the quality of air in your home and lists some of the most frequently encountered issues homeowners might find.

Smoke-free zone!

Smoking indoors harms your health and that of your entire family.
Smoking indoors harms your health and that of your entire family. | Source

Have a Smoke-Free Home

If you or someone in your family is a smoker, the single best step you can take to improve the air in your home is to avoid smoking in the house. Obviously, it's even better to quit smoking.

This year alone, the American Cancer Society estimates more than 200,000 cases of lung cancer will be diagnosed.

Aside from lung cancer, smoking increases the risk of other diseases such as asthma, it irritates the eyes and nasal passages, and can affect every other family member in the household. Even clothing exposed to smoke outside of the home can introduce tiny particles of irritants into your home if brought into the home.

Give some thought to whether you want your children or other family members exposed to these risks before you smoke indoors. And give some thought to whether you want to see them grow up and meet your grandchildren one day.

In addition to improving the quality of air in your home, you'll reduce other pollutants as well, because you will require fewer heavy-duty cleanings of upholstery, carpets and draperies. You'll also help keep your electronics in better shape if you avoid exposing them to smoke.

Austin Air HealthMate comes in black and other colors

Get an Indoor Air Cleaner

If someone in the household suffers from allergies, consider getting a portable indoor air cleaner. Many of them operate almost soundlessly and can cycle an entire room of air through their filters several times an hour.

Air cleaners remove most particles and dust in an indoor environment (all but the most microscopic elements), and help freshen the room. AllerAir makes a cleaner that can be rolled around from room to room and is capable of processing large volumes of air each hour.

Austin Air's HealthMate series includes compact models that can sit on a table or desk (or on the floor) and operate almost soundlessly on the lowest few speeds.

There are several types on the market, and each has its own features and recommendations. Sizes can range from just a few cubic feet and up; choose one that fits the size of your room, including the height of the ceilings.

BIgger units are available that can be installed directly through your central heating and air conditioning systems. These will often have removable filters you can wash by hand or in your dishwasher. They are generally more costly than portable units, but if you need to address your entire home (rather than just a few areas) they might be worth the investment.

While many of your indoor air quality issues can be addressed by taking the steps mentioned earlier here, if someone in your home has chronic health problems, an air cleaner can make a huge difference in reducing asthma, allergies and other problems caused by dust and irritants.

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  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 4 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Cyndi - thanks for your comments here. I have read that one reason we need to sustain plant life is for our air quality. It's rather scary to think of what will happen if we destroy the ecosystem - even a small dent in it could have consequences.

  • Cyndi10 profile image

    Cynthia B Turner 4 years ago from Georgia

    Good information. I don't have allergies, but I have thought about purchasing one because my house, like most these days, is not very well ventilated and it's too cold to open the window in winter, too hot in the summer.

    Recently another hubber posted an article about the best plants to clear the air. Adding plants to the home and the office is always a good idea.

    Voted up and useful. Sharing.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 4 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Habee - thanks for reading and sharing! I have serious allergies, too, and the air cleaners really helped during one particularly challenging season. I hope you can get the dust and dander under control - it's no fun to suffer that way.

  • habee profile image

    Holle Abee 4 years ago from Georgia

    These tips are soooooo useful! I have a severe allergy to dust mites, and I've been working on getting rid of dust in my home. It's pretty tough with two Great Danes. lol

    Voted up and shared!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 4 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Billionaire - you make a great point here! I need to make certain I have things organized in a way to promote goid air flow! Thanks for your comments!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 4 years ago from Planet Earth

    Oh, Lin - I can relate! I had my kitchen cabinets painted a few years ago and I almost had to move. If it's any consolation, the fumes indeed go away eventually. Good luck, and thanks for your comments here!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 4 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Garage-Remotes! Maybe taking care of these things as they happen is sort of a pay-it-forward way of doing home maintenance? Thanks for stopping by and commenting!

  • Lin02 profile image

    Lin02 4 years ago from India

    I actually having this problem in my room. I recently painted my room so it is not easy to live there because of the mushy smell of the paint. I will certainly look to use the pointers mentioned over here.

  • garage-remotes profile image

    Rob Reel 4 years ago from Los Angeles, California

    Have to agree... Squeegees are life-savers. The way I see it, the easier it is to keep the grime under control, the more likely you are to follow through. These are great tips.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 4 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, alocsin - thanks so much for attesting to the benefits of keeping on top of those things. I've seen those type of trade-offs, too, when small investments of time pay off in big ways. Thank you for reading and commenting!

  • alocsin profile image

    alocsin 4 years ago from Orange County, CA

    We actually started wiping down our showers after each use several years ago and not only have we never had mould, but it greatly cuts down on cleaning chores later. Also, ducts and your climate control system should be inspected once a year, not just for air quality reasons, but for maintenance. Voting this Up and Useful.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 4 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Aviannovice - thanks for your kind words! I've been surprised at what all we can control, too. And it really requires little effort to do so.

  • aviannovice profile image

    Deb Hirt 4 years ago from Stillwater, OK

    This was very well done and brings up what most of the air irritants are that we can readily control. Voted up and awesome.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 4 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thanks a great example of which ducts should not be cleaned in that manner, Lucy. Some ducts are easier to clean that way than others. Thanks for reading and commenting here!

  • LucyLiu12 profile image

    LucyLiu12 4 years ago from Boise, Idaho

    Great advice, especially about the duct cleaning - just take a look yourself before cleaning ducts - if they are made of insulation, DO NOT have them brushed and sucked as this distributes the mold spores into your home. Metal ducts are much more suited to scrubbing and cleaning. Voted up and useful! Thanks!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 4 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, fpherj! Thanks for your kind comments here! I'm glad you found the hub helpful!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 4 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thanks, Cre8tor - I appreciate your comments! Sometimes bathrooms are overlooked once the basic cleaning is done, but they need extra attention. Thanks for stopping by!

  • fpherj48 profile image

    Paula 4 years ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

    Marcy....Great choice to write about! Recently discussed this very thing with some friends, because of a few comments about the seriously hot and humid summer.....windows closed, AC on, pets spending more time indoors.......There is so much to this topic (cleaner air at home).....and you have certainly done your usual fantastic job of covering it all.

    Thank you Marcy....Great information!! UP+++

  • Cre8tor profile image

    Daniel Robbins 4 years ago from Ohio

    Spot on! You covered this very well. My wife works for a company that does mold remediation (among other things) and you are absolutely right in what you said about mold and how simple it can be to prevent, particularly in the bathroom. Voted way up!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 4 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Margie - I hope some of these tips help you get rid of those problems - both conditions can make you feel miserable. Many thanks for reading and commenting here!

  • Mmargie1966 profile image

    Mmargie1966 4 years ago from Gainesville, GA

    What a wonderful, and informative hub, Marcy! Great job! I will definitely have to take some of your advice since I have chronic headaches and sinusitis.

    Thanks for sharing. I voted up, useful, and will share this one as well.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 4 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Michael - thanks for reading and commenting here! I think the AC is a blessing and a problem; we can't live without it in Texas, especially now that cross-ventilation is history in home design. Maybe it's drying things out for you? Would a humidifier help?

    Glad you enjoyed the hub - and I hope you feel better!

  • Michael J Rapp profile image

    Michael J Rapp 4 years ago from United States

    Great advice. I tend to be really sensitive to indoor air quality. I like the summer because I can open the windows, but then when we use the AC my sinuses start acting up. It's nice to be cool, but ugh!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 4 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Charles - I agree, many people forget to use it, or don't care for the bit of noise it makes. It can greatly help in keeping the bathroom free from mold and other pollutants, though! Many thanks for reading and commenting, and for sharing your experience in these issues!

  • profile image

    Charles Hilton 4 years ago

    Excellent post! Very informative and practical, some of which I've advised to my residents. It's amazing how many don't use the bathroom vent fans and wonder why they get mold stains on the ceiling.

    Voted up!

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