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How to Make a Hugel Raised Garden Bed

Updated on April 4, 2014

How to Make a What?

A weed is a plant that has mastered every survival skill except for learning how to grow in rows.

Doug Larson

Those in Europe may well know what hugelkultur is; those in the United States might be a bit confused right now, so for my American brothers and sisters, allow me to explain.

Hugelkultur has been used in Europe for centuries. It is a gardening and farming technique whereby woody debris is used as a resource rather than detritus to be discarded.

If you are still confused think about a forest floor and nurse logs. Trees grow in the forest; trees die in the forest. Trees fall to the forest floor and then rot. They are covered by leaves and other natural debris, and from this rotting pile new growth appears and flourishes.

That is hugelkultur!

Our first attempt....an herb garden on top of a rotting log
Our first attempt....an herb garden on top of a rotting log | Source

Why Would You Use Hugelkultur?

When nature has work to be done, she creates a genius to do it.

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Are you kidding? A better question would be why wouldn’t you use it? Here are the obvious advantages to hugelkultur:

  • Help retain moisture in the ground
  • Build soil fertility
  • Improve drainage
  • Use woody debris that would otherwise be discarded
  • Conserve water
  • Increase the productivity of your garden

In fact, hugelkulture gardening is especially effective in areas that are traditionally tough for gardening. Urban areas where there is compact, hard soil; desert areas like Arizona; sandy soil; and areas where there is poor drainage. All are perfect for hugelkulture.

Our next project, which will be planted on top of a cherry tree trunk
Our next project, which will be planted on top of a cherry tree trunk | Source

How to Make a Hugel Garden Bed

The glory of gardening: hands in the dirt, head in the sun, heart with nature. To nurture a garden is to feed not just on the body, but the soul.

Alfred Austin

Follow these incredibly easy steps:

  • If you plan on using an existing raised garden bed, then dig down a couple feet before you begin. Otherwise, start on a flat piece of ground and begin the layering.
  • Lay wood along the ground in whatever shape you want your bed to be. You can use logs, chips, branches, old firewood and even lumber as long as it is not treated. Avoid using logs that will re-grow like willow or cottonwood. Alder, fir, maple and other such woods are excellent.
  • Fill in the gaps with twigs and small branches.
  • Cover this pile with soil.
  • On top of the soil add a layer of compost.
  • On top of the compost put a layer of organic material such as grass clippings or hay.
  • Allow the whole mixture to settle. The best time to begin this project is in the fall so that it settles during the winter, but you can also do this in the early spring.
  • And finally….plant!

A potato bed planted using this method; wood scraps are underneath the soil
A potato bed planted using this method; wood scraps are underneath the soil | Source

The Planting Process

During the first year, the soil in your hugel bed will be lacking in nitrogen, so the best crop to plant is potatoes. Onions will also do well that first year. After the first year, the wood underneath will begin releasing nitrogen into the soil, so you can begin to plant other traditional crops at that time.

Each time you plant add some compost. This is because the wood will break down and your garden will sink a bit with each year.

Soak thoroughly twice a week. It is not necessary to water more than that. The water will be stored in the wood and released into the soil when necessary.

Landscape to Taste

Many gardeners will border their mounds with stones to give their “garden” a nice landscaped look. If you plan on making several hugel beds, then put garden paths in-between the mounds for easy access.

An Extension of Permaculture

Hugelkulture is, of course, a simple extension of the basic principles of permaculture, a self-sustaining philosophy that embraces the following tenets:

  • Care for the earth: Providing for all life systems to continue and multiply.
  • Care for the people: Providing for people to access those resources necessary for their existence.
  • Return of surplus: Taking the surplus and reinvesting it back into the system to once again provide for the first two tenets.

In other words, a permanent culture where man and nature live in harmony.

One of the leading pioneers in this field of permaculture was Austrian farmer Sepp Holzer in the 1960s. He incorporated many of the following principles, all of which are active in Hugelkulture:

  • Observe and interact: Taking the time to engage with nature so we can find solutions that suit our particular situation.
  • Catch and store energy: Develop systems that collect resources so they can be used when needed.
  • Obtain a yield: Get rewards for the work you are doing.
  • Use and value renewable resources: Make the best of nature’s abundance to reduce our consumptive behavior.
  • Produce no waste: Use all the resources available to us so that nothing goes to waste.
  • Apply self-regulation: Systems will only continue to yield a bounty as long as man’s actions are regulated and over-use is eliminated.

And It All Adds up To……

To me a lush carpet of pine needles or spongy grass is more welcome than the most luxurious Persian rug.

Helen Keller

It all adds up to a fully-functioning and self-sustaining gardening system that will yield year after year bountiful crops, and isn’t that a lovely thought for gardeners?

Think about it….no more use of pesticides….no more use of additives….no more messing with the natural balance of nature. You will be gardening the way it was done many, many years ago before technology and science tilted the natural balance.

Take my word for it: Hugelkulture works! The first year will have limited returns, but after that first year you will see great yields of vegetables in your natural garden. We most certainly have in our hugel garden beds.

2014 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

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    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I agree, Peg, with that soil of yours, this would be the perfect method. Good luck and thank you.

    • PegCole17 profile image

      Peg Cole 3 years ago from Dallas, Texas

      You inspired me to get back to composting and trying this method of raised gardening. With the hard Texas soil, this sounds like the perfect solution to growing a decent crop of veggies.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Deb, I've known about it for many years. I had never heard it by this name, however, so I thought I would share it. Thanks!

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 3 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      I saw this many times while traipsing through the woods where I grew up. It was the richest, most beautiful soil, full of worms. When you have lots of worms, that is great soil. Glad to hear that you have discovered this. It will work so well for you.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Lizzy! Interestingly, nature has been using this method since the beginning of time. I'm guessing it will work for us if we don't manage to mess it up somehow. :)

    • DzyMsLizzy profile image

      Liz Elias 3 years ago from Oakley, CA

      Fascinating. Never heard of this terminology before, but it certainly makes sense. I just planted this years' vegetables in containers because we have a bad problem with gophers. However, perhaps this underlayment of sticks and logs might deter the little varmints. I'll have to look into trying this for next year, as we currently have a lot of wood tree trimmings that my grandson has yet to show up to chop up, as promised. Perhaps they can be put to good use instead.

      Voted up, useful and interesting.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Hi Gail, so good to see you. I hope all is well in your life. As always, thank you for your support.

      love

      bill

    • Happyboomernurse profile image

      Gail Sobotkin 3 years ago from South Carolina

      Hi Bill,

      I came here via the article that Shauna posted on her website.

      Never heard of a Hugel garden bed, but this does look easy and effective.

      Thanks for sharing this info.

      Voted up across the board except for funny and shared.

      Hugs & Love,

      Gail

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      And once again, thank you sujaya!

    • sujaya venkatesh profile image

      sujaya venkatesh 3 years ago

      good suggestion bil

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Glimmer, the answer is yes, so each year you add a layer of compost to make up for it.

    • Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

      Glimmer Twin Fan 3 years ago

      Awesome, cool, you name it! I've never heard of this and it's a terrific idea. Shared around. Does it sink down as the twigs and things decay?

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Some day indeed, Dianna! I'll be rooting for you that your someday happens soon.

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 3 years ago

      I learned a new gardening term today and only wish I had the space to do this. Some day!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Faith, we'll leave the light on for ya! LOL

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      LOL young man, you have plenty of years left ... and one day I may make it farther west than Texas! LOL

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      My goodness, Faith, I just can't seem to get it straight where you live. LOL Hopefully I'll live long enough to figure it out. :)

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Oh, we have that red clay here in one state over from Georgia, Alabama, too. Sorry for the confusion. I grew up in Georgia only because my dad served in the US Army and was stationed at Ft. Benning, Georgia. After I married, my husband, who enlisted in the Air Force for six years, we lived in Tampa, Florida for four years and loved it! Then Ft. Worth, Texas for only two years. After he no longer was in the Air Force, a long time ago, we moved to where his family is from, Alabama. So, Texas is as far west as I have been. I was born in Germany though, as my dad was stationed there and my mom flew over while she was pregnant with me. We left there when I was two years old and then lived in Georgia until I was married. I also loved a little seaside town called Rockport, Massachusetts, where my mom went to live for ten years (and experienced the "Perfect Storm"), after my dad died to visit and live with her sister That is the extent of where I have lived and traveled in this world LOL. I am sorry if I confused you. I just like to say southern USA to keep things simple. The raised bed will work great here too, due to the red clay, as I stated before!

      Enjoy your day!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Sujaya!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You are very welcome, Rajan! Thanks for the visit.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Marlene! I figure if it's good enough for nature then it's good enough for me. Good luck with it if you try it, and have a wonderful week.

    • sujaya venkatesh profile image

      sujaya venkatesh 3 years ago

      valuable tips bil

    • rajan jolly profile image

      Rajan Singh Jolly 3 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      Thanks for this lesson in hugelkulure Bill. I had absolutely no idea about it.

    • MarleneB profile image

      Marlene Bertrand 3 years ago from Northern California, USA

      I like this a lot. Bill, I have not heard of Hugel gardening, but in the back of my mind, I pictured the concept (things that happen naturally in nature) being a process that we humans could follow as a natural way to grow food in our own back yards. Thank you for introducing me to this as a formal concept to explore. I'm looking into this more because it makes a lot of sense.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jo, I certainly understand the attraction to growing flowers. Carry on my friend. Whatever makes you happy.

      Have a wonderful second week of April, and thank you!

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jackie, poetry has to be easier. LOL I love your sense of humor. Thanks for the laugh on this Sunday afternoon.

    • tobusiness profile image

      Jo Alexis-Hagues 3 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

      I've done this in my previous garden but I've not heard it referred to as a hugel before, something new for me. My current garden consists of mostly raised beds, I should plant more vegetables but I can't resist planting just one more flower. Maybe this autumn will be the time to make some room. Excellent hub, very useful.

    • Jackie Lynnley profile image

      Jackie Lynnley 3 years ago from The Beautiful South

      Billy I have my frame almost ready to go. I forget whose recipe I used but all you guys with the fantastic know how have changed me from a poet to a gardener! I don't know which is more fun...but I am finding out which is easier! lol ^+

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      John, you are right on. Our neighbor across the street does exactly that in her front yard and grows great vegetables every year. Thanks for mentioning that.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Alicia! It really is so simple to do. The forests have been doing this for thousands of years.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks vkwok! This is a page right out of nature and so easy to do.

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 3 years ago from Queensland Australia

      Great hub Bill. Thumbs up need I say more? (oh, you can also place a layer of hay or straw over the wood scraps and sticks if you have easy access to that and not excess soil). Many plants can be grown directly into hay bales, just make small hollows and fill with a little soil, then place the plants in and water regularly.

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 3 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      I had to laugh when I read your first sentence, Bill, because this is exactly what went through my mind when I read the title of your hub in my email notifications! Thank you for introducing me to a new term and a new method of gardening. I love the sound of Hugelkulture.

    • vkwok profile image

      Victor W. Kwok 3 years ago from Hawaii

      Interesting hub, Bill. Thanks for sharing!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you DDE! I hope this technique helps you.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Ann!

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Nice photos and I have great interest in gardening.

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 3 years ago from SW England

      Hope you enjoy a relaxing weekend too, bill. Ann

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, you have me laughing and that's always a lovely gift. Thank you! I'm just a time budgeter, and don't waste too much of it. Time is running out for me dear friend.

      Have a great weekend.

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      grand old lady....LOL I have not heard of such a movie but now I am very curious.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Great Shelley! I hope you give it a try and enjoy it as much as we do. Thank you!

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 3 years ago from SW England

      Never heard of this specific method but it obviously works well and logically it should! Useful and interesting. With all these things, how on earth (sorry about pun) do you have time to write?!!

      I think you could run the world single-handedly; shall we run a campaign? - Holland for Hugelworld!

      Great one, bill. Ann

    • grand old lady profile image

      Mona Sabalones Gonzalez 3 years ago from Philippines

      Billybuc, thanks for the advice on cutting the banana peel into really small pieces. My old compost didn't work cause I'd use food that the dogs would dig up and eat. I got the banana peel idea from a Denzel Washington movie about a guy who killed himself with a jellyfish.

    • CyberShelley profile image

      Shelley Watson 3 years ago

      Thank you for sharing such a wonderful idea - Hugel gardening, again you have taught me something very useful as I do love gardening.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ruby, I would be money there is a tree trunk underneath, and if there is all you have to do is layer with topsoil and plant. Nature has done the work for you.

      Thank you for your kind words. Have a great weekend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      grand old lady, it is an excellent idea and will do well. The smaller you can cut up the banana peels the better.

      Thank you and have a great weekend.

    • always exploring profile image

      Ruby Jean Fuller 3 years ago from Southern Illinois

      This is amazing Bill. I have a natural raised area in my back yard and wondering wry? If you remember, i just bought this home this past december and there are many plants and trees that i'm unfamiliar with. This area looks like a raised grave but i don't believe it is, no headstone. I will dig down and see what is there, if it is wood, then i know it will be a hugel planting area. You have the best ideas. Thank you for sharing once again..........

    • grand old lady profile image

      Mona Sabalones Gonzalez 3 years ago from Philippines

      I like the idea that hugelculture helps to retain moisture in the ground. Incidentally, after reading so many articles on plants, I have made my first investment in a long time -- a trowel. I have a big pot with a dead plant in it. I plan to uproot the plant and use banana peels to make a compost for good soil. But with this hugelculture, I may even cut up the dead plant and put that in the soil as well. Do you think that is a good idea?

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Patsybell, I appreciate you stopping by. Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Nell, I'm assuming that is German although I really don't have a clue. All I know is it is a tough word to type. LOL Thanks for stopping by.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Lizzy, it works well anywhere where the soil is not terribly ideal. I'm sure it would work well in Florida.

      Thanks Lizzy and take care of those eyes. :)

    • Patsybell profile image

      Patsy Bell Hobson 3 years ago from zone 6a, SEMO

      I've heard of this, but it is so good to get complete information. There are some good resources here. Very helpful.

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 3 years ago from England

      Hi Bill, I had heard of the idea but the word hugelkultur totally threw me! lol! thats such a good idea, and if I had a garden I would definitely give this a go, great hub as always! nell

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      Liz Davis 3 years ago from Hudson, FL

      When I first saw this title in my inbox, I thought it said "How to Make a Huge! Raised Garden Bed". My eyes aren't working lately. This is so cool. I had never heard of this form of gardening before--it would probably work well down here since all we have is sand.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Bill, after the winter you guys have had, there should be no shortage of downed limbs. Have a great weekend my friend and thank you.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Same principle, Sheila. Just bigger limbs and twigs underneath. Good luck and I hope you find it useful. Thank you!

    • bdegiulio profile image

      Bill De Giulio 3 years ago from Massachusetts

      Great tip Bill. I'll be sure to put this to work in my garden this year. If there is one thing I have plenty of after this past winter it's twigs and branches. Great job, have a nice weekend.

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      sheilamyers 3 years ago

      Very interesting and educational. I knew about how the downed trees in the forest put nutrients back in the soil, but I would've never thought to use them in the way you mentioned in a vegetable garden. I use the dead limbs and twigs from my trees in my flower beds. I just break them into little pieces and use them instead of buying mulch from the store.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      MizB, we did it last year and had no problems. Tomatoes grew like crazy from windblown seeds. LOL The potatoes had no problem, and the herbs are all thriving. It's worth a try my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jamie, this should work really well in Nevada...hope you can give it a try. Thanks buddy!

    • MizBejabbers profile image

      MizBejabbers 3 years ago

      Really cool. We live right by woods, so I know that some things like to grow in natural compost. We would have a never-ending supply of rotted wood, so it would be worth a try. We tried hydroponics for about 5 years and had little success, including the worst-tasting tomatoes in the world. So you've tried it and had no problems with fungus that really likes to grow on rotted wood? Great hub as always, Friend Bill. Voted up++

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      Jamie Lee Hamann 3 years ago from Reno NV

      Good stuff Bill and as always extremely helpful! Thank you for sharing. Jamie

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Well darn it, Dr. Bill....maybe some day in the future. :) Thanks, anyway, for stopping by.

    • DrBill-WmL-Smith profile image

      William Leverne Smith 3 years ago from Hollister, MO

      What fun! Always wanted one of these... but now, yard is so small, not any room at all... Thanks for sharing! ;-)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Faith, it is my pleasure, and thanks for sharing lunch with me again. Give it a try. I'll be curious how it does in the red Georgia clay.

      blessings always...have a great weekend.

      bill

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      It really is, Donna, and it would be cool to live next door to someone who loves gardening as much as I do. Thanks...we plant this weekend by the way.

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      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Wow, it is true ...we do learn something new each day, or at least I do! Lol ... I read this with fascination. I truly want to get this going as we have a lot of red clay here, so this is perfect. Now, I just have to figure out a spot so that our new Lab puppy will not be able to get to it! I love potatoes to get going the first year. Thank you for sharing about all of this with us. Have a great weekend, Faith Reaper ...

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      Cygnet Brown 3 years ago from Springfield, Missouri

      I wish we lived next door to one another it would be so much fun comparing notes about what we know! I love hugelkultur! When you think about what it can do especially in areas where rain seldom occurs, but rains a lot at a time, hugelkultur really is a God-sent idea!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I'm glad you like it, Gypsy, and good luck with it. Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Great Audry! Good luck and thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you BNadyn! It really does work well, especially in places where water is short and it is hot.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks again Ann!

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      Gypsy Willow 3 years ago from Lake Tahoe Nevada USA , Wales UK and Taupo New Zealand

      Thanks for the lesson. I shall certainly put it to good use. Love gardening and learning something new and useful.

    • AudreyHowitt profile image

      Audrey Howitt 3 years ago from California

      This just makes so much sense! I had not heard of this before--but have plenty to add to a mix in my back yard--Thanks Bill!

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      Bernadyn 3 years ago from Jacksonville, Florida

      Nice topic to talk about, I have never heard of this but am glad you informed us. What a great way to garden and not waste! I know some people who like to garden who would be interested in learning this if they don't already.

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      Ann1Az2 3 years ago from Orange, Texas

      Great idea - I have plenty to bury right now - they're everywhere. And I have a garden started already. Thanks! And you have a great weekend as well.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I love the fact, Dora, that people in other parts of the world do this already. There are few secrets in the world my friend. A good idea in Europe will spread worldwide eventually.

      Thank you and have a great weekend.

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      Dora Weithers 3 years ago from The Caribbean

      I think that Caribbean people do this extent--but never heard that name. It makes so much sense and pays great dividends in the long run. If we take all your advice, we can only prosper. Than k you.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, the cones will work quite nicely. Bury them all my friend and the sit back and watch the magic. :)

      Thank you and have a great weekend.

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      Ann1Az2 3 years ago from Orange, Texas

      I just knew there had to be a use for all of these pine needles! I'm surrounded by pine trees - Hurricane Rita hit them pretty hard, but to me, they are still beautiful. Will the cones work as well?

      Thanks for this idea, Bill! You're a wonder!

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Very cool, Kimberly. Good luck and thanks as always!

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      Kimberly Lake 3 years ago from California

      Ok billybuc I will be on the hunt for some branches and other tree discards this is a great time of year to find them. Thanks again.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Kimberly, I promise this will work. It will take a year for the nitrogen to be introduced into the soil, but then you are set year after year as long as you add compost. Good luck and thanks.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Very cool indeed, Sha, and so easy to do. Have fun with it and thanks for sharing the link.

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      Kimberly Lake 3 years ago from California

      I have seen this but didn't know the name, very interesting. I have a soil problem in my front yard, the soil is very dry and low in nutrients. I have been composting for about 3 years to try to bring soil up in quality I think this is a great idea too. Thanks! Voted up and pinned.

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      Shauna L Bowling 3 years ago from Central Florida

      This is too cool! I learned something fascinating and very valuable today! Now I know what to do with all the fallen branches that end up in my backyard.

      This is the best means of conserving water I've ever seen. Hugel beds not only store water but enrich the soil and yield edible crops.

      I've been thinking of addressing water conservation as the next topic for my blog. I will include a link to this hub when I write it. This is exciting, Bill. I love it!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Crafty, that is a classic story! Yes indeed, that is hugelkulture at its finest. I love this story. It is so simple...we just use what nature has given us and then get the heck out of her way.

      Thank you my friend and have a great weekend.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Ha! I love this Billy! I didn't know there was a word for it. I had severe drainage issues on one side of my house. Years ago, this property was farm land surrounded by fences for cows, horses, and bulls. Those were all pulled up. The side of my property is a grassy hill, but was used as a through way to the back of where my house sits.

      Well, after I moved here, I realized there was a run-off problem. Every time it rained, dirt and debris would rush down through to the road from the rutted out grass from the farmer driving up through with his truck.

      I thought I would something about it, but I didn't have money to buy fancy stones or decorative trees. So, at that time, I had a truck, and I would go down to the bottom of my property and rake up the leaves and dump them in the ruts. Pretty soon, year after year, the leaves would compost and dirt would fill in the ruts. Now I have berry bushes including edible wild berries. We have wineberries and raspberries growing wild all over where it was once rutted out. I just never knew there was a method to my madness. LOL

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      Old Poolman 3 years ago

      I guess the statement "You are never too old to learn" is true. This is something I would like to try and I thank you for sharing you knowledge with us.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Glad to hear it, Flourish. Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Well thank you Janine. I feel I really accomplished something with this one. :) Send it to your dad; he'll be able to use it.

      Thank you dear friend.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      I've never heard of Hugelkultur or a Hugel raised garden bed. Good hub, Bill. I learned something today!

    • Janine Huldie profile image

      Janine Huldie 3 years ago from New York, New York

      You totally taught me something new here today, Bill. I really never heard of this, probably because I have never really gardened with my black thumb, but still love learning a bit about this here from you. thanks for sharing and Happy Friday now.