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Reasons Why Organic Gardening Is Best For All Of Us

Updated on January 31, 2014

Credit Where Credit Is Due

I would like to see people more aware of where their food comes from. I would like to see small farmers empowered. I feed my daughter almost exclusively organic food.

Anthony Bourdain

In 1962 an American marine biologist and conservationist, Rachel Carson, published a book called “Silent Spring.” Although fiercely opposed by chemical companies and branded as heresy by many, “Silent Spring” led to a reversal in our national pesticide policy, let to a ban on DDT, and essentially began an environmental movement which led to the creation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

I read Ms. Carson’s book when I was a junior in college in 1969. Was I disturbed by its claims? Most definitely! Was I moved to action? No!

There was no doubt in my mind that what Carson wrote about was true. It was infinitely logical. Still, like many other Americans, I went about my life fertilizing my lawn, killing bugs with sprays, and generally gardening with a rather casual disdain for the damage I was doing to the environment. I told myself that I was a busy man and sprays were much simpler. It was a matter of convenience for me, and if the earth was harmed so that my life could be more convenient then so be it. What difference does one person make after all? How much damage could I be making, really?

About fifteen years ago I came to my senses and began adoption environmentally safe methods of dealing with my gardening tasks. I am a proud member of the Green Revolution today, and although I cannot undo the damage I did many years ago, I can make sure I do not add to that damage today.

Organic gardening is the only socially responsible approach that can be taken for those of you who love to turn the soil and care for seedlings. It is my hope that after you read this article you will properly dispose of your sprays and commercial fertilizers and join me in helping Mother Nature.

Will you follow me? Let me give you three reasons why organic gardening really is the only sane approach one can take.

This is what we are trying to save by gardening organically
This is what we are trying to save by gardening organically | Source

The Environment

Do I really have to teach you about ecosystems? Maybe just a little reminder will help.

Chemicals wash into the local waterways and create havoc on marine life. Pesticides lead to colony collapse disorder, completely wiping out species of insects and further straining the delicate natural balance. One key ingredient in lawn and garden chemicals is oil. Is there any rational person who believes that spraying oil on a plant or lawn is a good practice?

This is who we are trying to save by gardening organically
This is who we are trying to save by gardening organically | Source

Your Health

Of the thirty most common pesticides used today, nineteen of them are carcinogenic, twenty-one havi negative effects on reproductions, thirteen are linked to birth defects, twenty-six cause kidney or liver damage, and at least eleven cause hormonal disruption. They have also been found to increase miscarriage rates, increase a child’s risk of developing asthma, and have been shown to pass from a mother to child via both the umbilical cord and breast milk.

Last year in the United States, farmers released 57 million pounds of glyphosate on the environment by way of sprays and fertilizers. Because glyphosate is systemic, it works its way into the plant and eventually into the fruit and produce that we eat.

The Cost to Your Pocketbook

If you are a gardener then you know that chemicals are expensive. You buy a pump sprayer; you buy the herbicides; you buy the fertilizers; all cost you money that does not need to be spent.

I can kill weeds in my driveway by pouring boiling water on them. The cost? Practically nothing! I can make my own compost for no cost at all, or I can spend my hard-earned money buying fertilizers. In fact, give me five minutes and I can find, online, fifty alternative methods to dealing with fertilizing and spraying that will not harm the environment, me or my bank account.

And a Bonus Fourth Reason

This really is the one that means the most. You should practice organic gardening because it is the right thing to do. No responsible citizen purposely does damage to the environment. No sane person purposely does damage to themselves. In a world becoming more fragile daily, can there be any justification for practicing unsafe and harmful gardening techniques? The answer, clearly, is no!

The rewards are many
The rewards are many | Source

A Quick Outline of Proposed Steps to Be Taken

Each of these suggestions will require a separate article, so for now I’m simply going to give you a brief outline as a plan of attack.

  • Conserve water in the garden
  • Reduce garden chemicals to protect our water
  • Landscape to prevent eroding soil and to control runoff
  • Practice composting using waste
  • Consume less energy with proper landscaping
  • Protect ecosystems and habitats, and make your garden supportive to other habitats

Start a community garden
Start a community garden | Source

Going One Step Further

Practicing organic gardening is a huge first step, but our efforts must not stop there. These are serious times in the United States. Our farming industry is now controlled by huge agribusinesses whose sole purpose is to produce as much product as possible by whatever means, regardless of what damage might be done.

Yes you can help by practicing organic gardening, but there is so much more you can do. Here are a few suggestions:

  • Buy organic meat and produce at the grocery store. Yes it will cost you more but really, what is the price for your family’s health?
  • Request that local nurseries carry eco-friendly products.
  • Encourage your community leaders to make community gardens on unused land.
  • Educate your neighbors. Chat with them and tell them the efforts you are taking to be a more responsible gardener and citizen.
  • Ask your neighbors to share their compostable yard waste with you.
  • Start a tree planting campaign in your community.
  • Volunteer at local parks and work with them to practice eco-friendly management.
  • Get involved politically. Organize and lobby for safer farming and gardening practices.
  • Educate your children and get them involved in safer gardening techniques.

So what do you think? Are you willing to give organic gardening a try?

See results

Some Final Thoughts

Can one person make a difference in this world? I would submit to you that Rachel Carson certainly did. Of course, not all of us will have that type of impact, but we can most definitely add positives where positives are needed.

The writer of this article lives in a rather remarkable city, Olympia, Washington. Here organic gardening and farming are encouraged. The local government supports eco-friendly activities. Community gardens can be found in a great number of neighborhoods. Schools teach about organic gardening and local organizations are earth-conscious and make every attempt to sell earth-friendly products.

This kind of civic responsibility did not suddenly ignite without kindling. Individual citizens who were concerned began taking small steps, and those small steps gained momentum. One person here, talking to one person there, and suddenly a group of people working together to affect much-needed change.

If it can happen in Olympia it can happen in your town or city. Perhaps you will be the catalyst in the weeks and months to come. If so, allow me to thank you now for the work you will be doing soon.

2014 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

“Making a difference one person at a time.”

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    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Deb, you said it all when you said that good food has no price tag. I'm with you my friend.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 3 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      This has always made sense. My father was the original organic gardener where we lived in the late 60's and 70's, which is where I learned it from. Gosh, good food has no price tag. I'm happy to say that I grew up healthy.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      LOL....the nuns used to tell me that...."clever boy, Billy." I don't think they meant it as a compliment. :)

      bill

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 3 years ago from SW England

      What a flatterer you are! Yes, I have grandchildren - 2 granddaughters (13 & 3), one grandson (3) and another grandson due at the end of March. That's when I'll disappear from hubpages for a week or so as I'm 'booked' to stay at my daughter's house to 'help'!!

      Of course you're a clever boy! Ann

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Theresa, I'm just trying to give back to the community. It's as simple as that. Thank you my friend.

      blessings always

      bill

    • phdast7 profile image

      Theresa Ast 3 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

      Bill-

      Interesting, informative, and persuasive essay. But yours always are. Lots of great information in here and the videos were very helpful, as well. I will definitely do container tomatoes again this year. I hope never to eat a store bought tomato in fall or summer, ever again. You are such an encourager,. Blessings. Theresa

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Glimmer, I love it...I really do. I can hardly wait to hear all about it and I'll smile knowing you are eating fresh potatoes inspired by one of my articles. Thank you!

    • Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

      Glimmer Twin Fan 3 years ago

      I've enjoyed your articles on organic gardenening and it really making me think Bill. I do know that last week I went out and bought a tall outdoor wire basket and am going to be giving growing potatoes in a tower a try. May just be a hub for me. We'll see...but your articles are inspiring me because I've always thought I did not have any room for a veggie garden.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, you made me laugh...you are the clever girl for sure. LOL

      Bravo to you my friend. Keep up the good work. I love that you encourage your grandchildren to garden, but I am quite amazed that you are old enough to have grandchildren. Now, who's the clever boy then? LOL

      Have a wonderful day my delightful friend.

      bill

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 3 years ago from SW England

      I'm feeling proud, not to say smug, after reading this! I've never used chemicals on my garden. I grow my own herbs, have lots of tubs of pretty flowers and re-seed some of them. I have a 'butterfly sanctuary' down at the end of the garden - not big, but it has lots of nettles and mint and the bonus is that I get to photograph the creatures that enjoy it. I encourage the grandchildren to garden with me; they have their own sunflower seeds, their own pot plants and know that flowers last a lot longer if you let them be rather than pick them to death.

      So who's a clever girl then?!!!

      No, I don't pretend that I haven't still got things to learn on this subject but I'm trying. Added to that, our garden has no grass and isn't very big, so easy to tend.

      I hope others heed your advice and do what is right so that our individual endeavours really do make a difference. Ann

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you for mentioning that compost bin...such a simple task and so many rewards from it.

    • PegCole17 profile image

      Peg Cole 3 years ago from Dallas, Texas

      Great information here, Billybuc. Raising awareness of the need to go organic is so important in these times of GMOs and pesticides. I've made a renewed effort to be more green in the recent past and will use some of these helpful tips to do even better for my next garden. About 5 years ago I invested in a compost bin and wow, I've really reaped the rewards from it.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks John; I'll be there shortly.

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 3 years ago from Queensland Australia

      Hey Bill, it has passed this time and has been republished. Just letting you know.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I'll be looking for it John. :)

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 3 years ago from Queensland Australia

      I have reworked my hub and resubmitted it, so cross your fingers. If it's rejected again I think I'll just republish it on my blog site.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Eric; I'll do that.

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 3 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      John I was bummed I got there late. I got hit with a similar flag yesterday. And it just did not make any sense.

      Bill I thought maybe you might like having a peek at some of the research I am doing --- just links, but go to the one on pricing and look at Dill and Cilantro --- really interesting

      http://www.nal.usda.gov/afsic/pubs/ofp/ofp.shtml

      http://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/cgi/viewcontent....

      http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/getfile?dDocName=S...

      http://www.nal.usda.gov/afsic/pubs/agnic/susagfund...

      http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/Portals/0/G...

      ay%20Soils%20-%20Annuals5.pdf

      http://rodaleinstitute.org/farm/organic-price-repo...

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      That happens from time to time, John. I got to your article late and it had already been flagged...try again because that information needs to be shared.

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 3 years ago from Queensland Australia

      Bill, I wrote a hub about the dangers of GMOs and shared it on Facebook. It was packed with disturbing facts, but HP has unpublished it due to some duplication. A couple of people got to read it before it was removed and were quite shocked by the contents. I will try to republish because the message is so important. I wish HP would tell me which parts they consider duplicated to make it easier though.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Flourish; since he feeds that homeowners association I am guessing he will be allowed to carry on for years. :)

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      My dad has been gardening for decades and is the only one in our large subdivision of 600+ homes to have a garden for a backyard. (They forgot to disallow tall corn as a sight nuisance in the homeowners association bylaws.) He's been doing it the organic way for ages and his garden and apple trees are so productive that he ends up feeding not only his own family but lots of neighbors, too. Nature's bounty is the best way to go.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      chefsref, great point about not tilling...we don't do that either, but just plow under what left...no problems here doing that...and wonderful point about our ancestors...one has to wonder, doesn't one?

      Thanks a lot, Lee!

    • chefsref profile image

      Lee Raynor 3 years ago from Citra Florida

      Hey Billybuc

      Going all organic is a difficult task for me. I've eliminated using pesticides but I still have a supply left from years ago (before I knew how harmful they are). There's no way to get rid of them! In the trash they just contaminate a different place, down the toilet and they contaminate the ground water, use them in the garden and they destroy beneficial bugs, damage your health and contaminate anyplace where they touch.

      As for fertilizer I still use a little chemical fertilizer but mostly I have switched to compost. Florida soil is dreadful so I end up buying a lot of compost, I just can't generate enough.

      The one tip I can offer as to soil is not to till! When I am done with a crop I simply chop it up where it grew and let it feed the soil. Far easier than lugging plant materials around, tossing and turning it and then carrying it back. I still compost kitchen scraps and weeds.

      Aside from lousy soil my biggest problem is critters. I have an assortment of squirrels, rabbits, field mice and rats that like to stop by for a b it of salad. I finally found something that lets me grow what I want but again it is derived from oil. I use frost blankets (like Remay) so at last I can grow broccoli and kale.

      All of this makes me ask how our forebears dealt with the issues I have. I wonder if we have lost some techniques and knowledge that our grandparents knew?

      Lee

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      John, I applaud you for practicing this...we need more of you tilling the soil my friend. Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Alicia, obviously it is very important. Makes me wonder why more don't do it. Thank you my BC friend.

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 3 years ago from Queensland Australia

      Another important article promoting the need for everyone to move towards organic gardening, Bill. Organic gardening is a major element in my field of 'Permaculture' and I applaud you for spreading this important message.

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 3 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Great suggestions, Bill. Reducing the use of potentially dangerous chemicals is very important for the Earth and for us.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      We do indeed, vkwok; I suspect more and more are realizing that.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Wiccan, nice solution. I had never thought of that. I'll keep that in mind this spring.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Blond, I heard someone the other day say there is no way they would buy organic fruit because it doesn't look pretty...I swear to God they said that. I don't even know what to say to that kind of logic.

      Thank you for your thoughtful comment; hopefully we can convince a few people that organic means good health.

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      PS, really? Where in Washington?

      Trust? I'm fresh out my friend. I trust myself and a very select group of friends. That's it.

      Thanks for the angels; blessings and hugs heading your way.

      bill

    • vkwok profile image

      Victor W. Kwok 3 years ago from Hawaii

      We all need to do our part for the environment. Great advice to healthy living.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Donna and I agree, it does taste better. Unfortunately, too many people are ruled by cost these days; hopefully that will change.

    • WiccanSage profile image

      Mackenzie Sage Wright 3 years ago

      Nice work Billy; I keep a big veggie & herb container garden on my big screen porch and it's much easier to maintain organically because thanks to the screen I don't have to worry about weeds or pests as much. It brings a certain peace of mind to know that there are no poisons and chemicals involved. Thanks!

    • Blond Logic profile image

      Mary Wickison 3 years ago from Brazil

      Yes of course you are right. We have allowed ourselves to be brainwashed in so many ways. Sometimes when we shop we only choose things that look perfect. These are usually tasteless imitations of what food use to be. They have been designed to travel well without bruising and be 'appealing to the customer'. When we look at homegrown fruit and veg, they are different sizes and shapes and taste as food should.

      We as consumers need to refuse to buy the rubbish they call fresh fruit and veg. We should buy and consume things when they are in season and not buy items shipped in from countries where their precious water is being used to grow strawberries for Westerns for their Christmas fayre. I know, here in Brazil, they use chemicals on the crops which are banned in other countries. I have no doubt it is the same in other developing nations. Many of these are exported.

      Each and every one of us needs to stop and question where our food comes from, what has been used on it, and ask what the alternative is. I think the consumer has forgotten just how much power he has.

      Great hub.

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 3 years ago from sunny Florida

      Hi Bill

      I do agree that growing our own foods so we know what is used in the soil and on the plants is smart . Likewise for animals that we ingest. But I am skeptical of buying such items at the store. I just do not have a high level of trust...I am usually very positive about things...but not so much with the items in organic places unless I know the owners.

      Great information as always

      Angels are on the way to you and yours...ps

      by the way I just found out that my cousin lives in Washington State...

    • donnah75 profile image

      Donna Hilbrandt 3 years ago from Upstate New York

      The other bonus: organic food seems to taste better. Maybe that is all in my head, but I agree that organic is the best way to go. We all benefit from less chemicals. I'll be sharing this article and spreading the word. :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Good morning Eddy! Raining here too but colder weather on the way this week...possible snow....winter is arriving late here. It will be a lovely day despite the weather my friend and I wish you the same.

      billy

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you susi10.....I just want people to consider the possibility. I don't trust agribusiness and I would rather people make the effort to become informed and worry about the health factors.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you vellur; I appreciate you visiting on this Saturday. Take care now.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks bac2basics. Without a doubt we should do our research. I have and I hope others do as well.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Julie, looking at the bigger picture seems to be tough for many people. I agree with you; because of online sources it is quite easy to do this now...I just hope more people try it. Thank you for stopping by.

    • Eiddwen profile image

      Eiddwen 3 years ago from Wales

      Another wonderful lesson and I agree with your theories 100%.

      It is pouring down here but hope its a little better with you and you are spending time out in your wonderful haven. Voting up and sharing Billy my dear friend. Enjoy your weekend.

      Eddy.

    • susi10 profile image

      Susan W 3 years ago from The British Isles, Europe

      Great hub, Bill! I love vegetable gardening and I grow everything from peas to beans to tomatoes. I am not a huge fan of pesticides and I never use them, I use a little fertiliser now and again just to boost growth. But what you are saying is very true, the world needs to slow down on the pesticides and think of their actions. We were given the Earth as a gift and it is our responsibility to protect it. I am definitely more aware of organic gardening and I will be raising awareness about it too. Thanks for this.

    • Vellur profile image

      Nithya Venkat 3 years ago from Dubai

      A great hub, organic gardening is a great way of taking care mother earth and taking care of our health plus the added benefits of saving up.

    • bac2basics profile image

      Anne 3 years ago from Spain

      Hi Bill.

      I applaud the organic gardening movement wholeheartedly and feel far too many chemicals are employed in commercially grown food crops and in the animals reared to provide our daily meat ration. However I am a little confused about your reference to glyphosate being present in the un organically grown fruit and vegetables we consume. As far as I am aware glyphosate is actually a broad spectrum herbicide and therefore couldn´t be present in food stuffs because the use of it would kill the plant therefore no fruits or veg could be produced. It has to be said also that gardening organically and eating organically produced food isn´t as safe or as natural as many people presume if proper precautions and hygiene are not adhered to. The use of animal manures can and does carry some significant health risks, E coli and Salmonella being just two. So Bill whilst I still stand by your principles I do feel we all need to do our research before jumping on the green bandwagon.

    • Jools99 profile image

      Jools99 3 years ago from North-East UK

      Interesting article Bill - I think the cost of buying organic puts some people off but if they looked at the bigger picture, they would see that the financial cost is pretty small. Growing organic fruit and veg has never been easier thanks to the internet. A little research online can offer many examples of how to go organic at little or no cost; we really have no excuse.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Faith, that's the way to do it....start small and enlarge as the years go on. The hardest work is that first year so might as well make it manageable so you don't get discouraged. :) Good luck and thank you.

      blessings my friend

      bill

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Excellent hub on an important topic! Organic is totally the way to go. You have me thinking now along those lines and we do have room in our yard for a garden, and maybe I can start small and see if I have a green thumb? You have presented a great challenge for all to get involved in our communities. That is awesome, how in your area, it is encouraged and practiced!

      Up and more and sharing.

      Have a great weekend,

      Faith Reaper

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Nell, it has gotten worse for sure, and my guess is it will keep getting worse until people finally come to their senses and quit buying that crap no matter how cheap it is. Thanks for sharing your thoughts and have a great weekend.

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 3 years ago from England

      Hi Bill, yes I totally believe you, I came to the conclusion a while back when I walked past a field and the spray from the back end of the tractor spraying chemicals all over the place made me want to gag. I suddenly thought, hang on, throughout history they didn't have all this horrible stuff on food, so why now? great hub as always, nell

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Pearl and obviously I agree with every word you wrote. I see progress, but like all progress it is slow....still, it is happening and that is encouraging.

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Dianna, I am excited for you. Best wishes selling the house and finding something where you can enjoy the simpler life. Thank you for sharing your experience and thoughts.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Donna, that is beautifully stated. I wish I had thought of that line....earth healing process. Beautiful!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Michelle; it's a bit expensive everywhere but worth it for sure.

    • grandmapearl profile image

      Connie Smith 3 years ago from Southern Tier New York State

      Billy, this is brilliant, my friend! We must turn this Earth around, undo the damage that has been done, and stop dumping toxins into nature. If we don't, we are doomed. Excellent, timely and very well done ;) Pearl

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 3 years ago

      So grateful for Carson who started the movement towards a better environment. Bill, our goal is to sell our home this year and move where we can have a small organic garden and live a simpler life. We had this years ago, back in the 70's. Funny, how you can lose sight of those good habits when the world offers you a "better life at a faster pace".

    • cygnetbrown profile image

      Donna Brown 3 years ago from Alton, Missouri

      I first learned about organic gardening from a pile of Organic Gardening Magazines that a girl brought on the school bus when I was twelve. I have always used organic methods exclusively. I love the fact that every garden plot that I have left behind has better soil than when I started on that bed. Organic gardening is an earth healing process.

    • midget38 profile image

      Michelle Liew 3 years ago from Singapore

      We are Eco-friendly and healthy with organic gardening. It's a bit expensive here , but worth it !

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Linda, it's pretty hard for me to argue against a pool. LOL I don't think this is a battle you are going to win, but thanks for stopping by and have a great weekend.

    • Sunshine625 profile image

      Linda Bilyeu 3 years ago from Orlando, FL

      If I had space for a garden I would have one. My family would rather keep the pool and deck instead. Not me, since it's just something else I need to maintain. Oh, I'd also need a green thumb which I do not have.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Audrey, thank you so much. This is a topic that has been important to me since my college days. Now that I am a writer I have no excuse not to promote it. Thank you for sharing and pinning and for just being you.

      love,

      bill

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      Audrey Hunt 3 years ago from Nashville Tn.

      I'm a huge advocate for organic gardening and buying organic food. I feel that the extra cost is well worth it. I also began replacing my towels, sheets and some other items with organic-made fibers. I have a set of wonderful, beautiful cereal bowls which are microwaveable and dishwasher safe and entirely made from recycled products. I buy all my clothes either used, or I order from an on-line source that features all clothing made from hemp and bamboo. If I could "do-it-all-over-again" and I had the money I would build me an organic house filled with organic/recycled furniture, etc. Love this hub Bill. We need more like this!

      Have Tweeted, Pinned to my board, FB and more.

      Sending you an 'organic' hug along with 'recycled' love :) ~ Audrey

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      breakfastpop, I do understand....best wishes to you and have a great weekend.

    • breakfastpop profile image

      breakfastpop 3 years ago

      I totally agree with everything you say, but putting what I know into action is another thing. I'll try my best. Up, useful, interesting and awesome!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Cam, I love it. I didn't know you had a son that lived near me...right down the road 100 miles. :) I hope he does well with his dream; it is a worthy undertaking for sure. Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Joelle. I am passionate about the environment and social injustice. That's where my passion lies in writing....now if I could only make some money doing it. :)

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      Chris Mills 3 years ago from Maple City, Michigan

      Loved the article Bill. My son and his girlfriend will be moving back to Michigan from Portland, OR in April. The long term goal is for them to slowly build an organic gardening business including a farm market and hopefully selling to local grocery stores/restaurants. It can be done. I've seen what my son has grown in Portland. It is an exciting trend that is slowly catching on everywhere. Detroit is blossoming in urban gardens. Thanks for promoting the cause with this fine article.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Lizzy, do people not want to see that which is obvious and true? I'm beginning to believe in the old "ignorance is bliss" adage, and quite frankly that terrifies me. We are a reactionary society; we don't do anything until the damage has already been done and then we scramble around looking for solutions when it is too late.

      Anyway, thanks....I'm glad we are friends.

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      kidscrafts 3 years ago from Ottawa, Canada

      I use no pesticides in my garden and it makes a lot of sense to me. In fact, I never used pesticides in my garden. As for buying organic meat and produces it makes sense and if more of us would go that way, the farmers and the stores would follow for sure. I think most people don't realize how chemicals can be damaging for their health and the environment!

      There will never be enough people who talk about it until we as a society don't use any armful chemicals.

      I find that fantastic that you use your talent as writer to write about this subjet, Bill!

      Enjoy your weekend!

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      Liz Davis 3 years ago from Hudson, FL

      People surely underestimate the damage caused by pesticides and chemical fertilizers, both in humans and in nature. You and I both know that's no accident! The minds of the general population are easily controlled by those with the big bucks. I wrote an article a while back about environmental toxins that cause neurodevelopmental problems in babies and children. The consequences of using all of these chemicals are easy to see in kids today.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ruchira, once a person establishes the garden the first year, the work after that is not bad at all....but that first year is definitely work. :) Thank you my friend.

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      Ruchira 3 years ago from United States

      organic gardening...definitely a yes from me.

      i have a small patch in my backyard and i try to grow veg while fruit trees nourish me with their vitamins.

      such an encoouraging take in this farming and no cost at all :)

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jo, this really is a matter of common sense vs convenience....i don't know if articles like this one will do any good or not, but I'm going to keep writing them in hopes that I can convert a few more followers.

      Have a wonderful weekend my dear friend.

      bill

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sha, it really is a great solution. The best solution I have found so far are our six chickens. They are in the garden right now fertilizing it and turning over the soil. What great little gardeners they are. LOL And they don't even get minimum wage. :) Thank you dear one.

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      Jo Alexis-Hagues 3 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

      Bill, you're preaching to the converted! I totally agree with everything you've said. Thank you for the tip about killing the weeds in the driveway with boiling water, I hadn't thought of that one, great idea. There are many courses on offer for those who want to learn more about organic gardening. We really need to wake up and get back to basic, I could really use a bigger garden, but I'm trying to do as much as I can with what I have. We're gradually poisoning not just us, but the whole planet. This is another very important article.

      My very best to you.

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      Shauna L Bowling 3 years ago from Central Florida

      This kinda article kinda really kinda sings kinda my song kinda. Sorry, Bill - just felt the need to spoof on the guy in the first video.

      Seriously, I love this article. I think at one time we all took advantage of the Earth, knowing full well the damage we were doing, but we were young and selfish then. Now we have no excuse.

      I use distilled white vinegar to eradicate the weeds and grass that pops up in my driveway. A gallon jug costs around $3.49. I always have it on hand because it replaces a lot of household chemicals also.

      I love the idea of "the lasagna" way of clearing a vegetable or even garden bed. I'd known about using newspaper in the soil but wasn't aware it can save hard work in removing grass and digging up the turf. At the same time, the layering effect acts as a soil amendment, giving the gardener a head start. For those of us who have lower back problems, that's a win-win solution for sure.

      Great post my friend!

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sheri, I love it....ugly is better! We can start a new slogan to drive home the point...pictures of really deformed veggies that taste great! LOL I think you are on to something there.

      Have a great weekend and thank you!

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      Sheri Dusseault 3 years ago from Chemainus. BC, Canada

      I agree with you on this one Bill. I would love to see more roof top gardens and community gardens in cities. I think we also need to educate people on how real veggies look...as in a crooked carrot or lumpy tomato is just fine!

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Eric, it's my latest cause....I just keep shouting out the truth and hope someone hears, buddy. Have a great weekend.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I love it Jackie! You make me laugh. What a wonderful sense of humor you have for a dignified Southern lady. :) Have a great weekend my friend and Long Live Organic Gardening.

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      Eric Dierker 3 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      What a wonderful cause to spread through your very talented writing with your great readership.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Made, I have not heard of that experiment and study but it is interesting. Hopefully something good will come from it. Thank you my friend; always good to see you during the long winter days. Enjoy your weekend.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      One day Victoria; I hope it comes soon for you. Thank you!

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you DDE...I hope we see more and more people doing this soon.

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      Jackie Lynnley 3 years ago from The Beautiful South

      You know I did organic gardening before I ever heard of it. When I had my own place and would plant my dad's plants he was gonna toss, especially the tomato plants; they would give me poison like blue dragon to put on them and I said no way and I used pepper spray (I made myself), bowls of beer for slugs (and they died happy!) or whatever I could think of and I had some really great looking plants without poison, for a novice! One summer blight hit everyone's tomatoes but mine, and I never figured that one out.

      Great hub as always and loved the videos!

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      Madeleine Salin 3 years ago from Finland

      Good hub, and a reminder for us to think about what we do and what we support if we buy, or not buy, organic products.

      Here in Finland they are now doing some research on using led lights to save energy when they grow tomatoes. They think the led lights can effect the taste, the quantity and the use of fertilizers. It's going to be interesting to see the results.

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      Victoria Van Ness 3 years ago from Prescott Valley

      I would love to be able to do this! At point point there were no grocery stores and there were no fast food restaurants. Everybody grew their own foods. But there were also no chemicals and preservatives in our foods that we didn't put there either. I would love return to that level of nutrition again. :)

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      Devika Primić 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Great hub with so many changes in food consumption it is certainly a healthy way to go and your reasons are so correct.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      That's what I'm hoping, Deb, is that by doing it myself I will influence others to do it, just as you have. Thanks for sharing your experience......upscale suburban subdivision in Iowa???? Heresy! LOL

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Carol, the "lots of rain" comment applied to us until this year...now we are talking drought. Oh well, most years we are lucky; it is good gardening country for sure, and I have no excuses....I need to get my butt out there and prepare the soil...maybe this weekend.

      Thank you, Carol, and have a great weekend.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Cyndi, I love your attitude and your love of Earth....carry on with what you are doing and influence others while you are doing it. Change must happen, lil Sis!

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      Deborah Neyens 3 years ago from Iowa

      Great follow-up to your organic food hub. Bob and I are considered a bit eccentric in our upscale suburban subdivision with our organic vegetable garden, backyard chickens, compost piles and so on. But the neighbors are always happy to share in our fresh produce and eggs. And a few have them have even started gardens of their own.

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      carol stanley 3 years ago from Arizona

      I am not sure if there is more illness to day as there are more people. However judging from the fat population they are not eating organic produce for sure. We don't have soil here for a good garden..One of these days though I am going to make bed or use pots or something. You are blessed with lots of rain in NW. I am extremely health conscious and as I said about 60-70 percent of our diet is product. Gotta get more organic. Being in good shape is who I am...and I am always looking for a better way to stay healthy...I hate diets so I never have to go on one..

      Your argument or statement here makes so much sense...

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      Cynthia Sageleaf 3 years ago from Western NC

      Organic gardening: yes. I read Silent Spring for my AP English class when I was a junior in high school: stunned I was.

      And now: no matter how much or how little money I have, I have resolved to always think, "will this increase my carbon footprint?" with any purchase I make. So, a bigger house? Forget it. I think about moving from our little holler here sometimes, but we've never, ever found anything that comes close to the amazingness it has: we have a small carbon footprint here because it's not a big house, we burn wood from trees that were already dead, keep the temp of our furnace at 65 degrees or less (yes, even less), do our own compost, and walk on the trails we created up on our mountain. We think "it'll be good to live closer to work" - because I have to commute over 20 miles one way (not that much...but five days a week it adds up to 200 miles a week - eesh!). But, so far, we've never been able to commit. So, perhaps the next purchase should be an electric car. HAHAH.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      We did make it, Janine, and hooray for us both. Thank you my dear and enjoy your weekend with that family of yours.

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      Janine Huldie 3 years ago from New York, New York

      Bill, I must say you make a totally compelling argument here and it is definitely daunting to say the least when you hear of all the negatives in not practicing organic gardening. The idea of all these illnesses being passed from mother to baby even in utero is very telling. Thanks for sharing and gave me even greater food for thought on this topic today. We made it and wishing you a great weekend now!