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Rotozip Rotary Tool My New Best Friend.

Updated on December 28, 2017
Grant's World profile image

A fellow human who loves his planet and beyond, with interests that match and never end. One life. One love. Appreciate everything.

Rotozip is one must have tool
Rotozip is one must have tool

Rotozip Is An Excellent Rotary Tool

Rotozip is a drywall router/cut out saw. Instead of using a keyhole saw you use this tool on your drywall. Depending on the tools bit you use, you can use your cut out saw on flooring, tile and all sorts of materials.

There are other types of drywall routers/cut out saws available from different companies. The ones that come to mind are Dremel, DeWalt, Bosch. I am sure most tool manufacturers have their own version of a rotary cut out tool.

I purchased a Rotozip so I can only speak on that one.

I am purchasing tools on a regular basis and it is the best tool I have purchased in a long time.

Currently I am developing my basement and am just about finished installing the gyproc or some call it drywall.

I used a keyhole saw for years to cut out outlet light and switch boxes. I would also use a keyhole saw for openings in doorways. Well thank you to the tool gods above, the Rotozip drywall router is such a cool little tool. It far exceeds any expectations I had before using it.

Do you own a Rotozip?

Do you currently own a Rotozip or rotary tool already?

See results

What Does A Rotozip Do?


You measure your board and mark where your cut out needs to be ( I mark the spot in two spots with a vertical and horizontal measurement and then use an actual box to trace where I need to cut) and turn on your rotozip and hold it at a 45 degree angle against the board and press the bit against the board and as it starts to cut through you straighten the rotozip out.

A drywall router cuts using a bit that is basically the same as a drill bit except it cuts with the spiral part of the bit on the shaft instead of sticking a drill bit head first against the wood or whatever and drilling.

Okay back to cutting your drywall. So you have poked your rotozip through your drywall. You need to hold on tight because that little sucker rotates at 33000 rpm.

I like to move the saw clockwise following my markings. Takes no time at all and you are done.

What Does A Rotary Tool Cost?

I talked to a friend who works in the trades and he said some boarders put the board up and then cut the hole out around the box.

Well that sounds like an even faster way to do it but I do not want to chance cutting into an electrical wire and zapping myself or starting to cut and realize I am no where near where the box is. Let me tell you I enjoy boarding, but taping and mudding?? Not so much.

I have used one bit so far for this job and I am almost done my whole basement. I can tell the bit is getting a bit dull so I just adjust the depth of it to find a sharper spot on the bit to cut with.

You also get a few different size shafts you can use on the rotozip so you can use different size diameter bits.

I paid $80.00 for mine and it has about a 6’ cord. I have seen them priced as high as $202.99 on an Amazon ad online.


Need One With A Super Long Cord?

I have seen one with a 50’ cord which would be great if you don’t want to take it into which ever room you are working on and plugging it in. I just used an extension cord and it works great.

You can also get cordless drywall routers. That would be a great route to take but only if your router comes with 2 batteries. I would never buy another power tool unless it has two batteries. That’s another story.

So if you are considering a drywall router or cut out tool I highly recommend a Rotozip. I am sure there are many other great versions out there as well.

© 2010 Grant Handford

Comments

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  • Grant's World profile imageAUTHOR

    Grant Handford 

    6 years ago from Canada

    Hey Gerry,I guess with anything mechanical there can always be a lemon. My rotozip is still going strong. Thanks for taking the time to read this hub.

  • profile image

    Gerry Stevens 

    6 years ago

    I got a roto zip for Christmas a few years ago and used it once and the main unit itself just froze up, not a happy camper. Anyways somebody from roto zip saw my blog and surpringly sent me a new or refurbished unit of course after I sent the burnt up one back to them along with all my attachments like the zip mate blades and a tool for cutting perfect circles and much more, unfortunately they didnt send me any of that stuff back, not even a handle, I think its great business what they did for me but somebody in shipping needs to pay better attention as to what I sent back, now I have nothing to work with but a couple cutting bits, once again not a happy camper, Thanks roto zip, at least your hearts were in it!

  • Grant's World profile imageAUTHOR

    Grant Handford 

    8 years ago from Canada

    A bigger garage sounds like a great idea. I would like more room in my garage for a workshop.

  • rmr profile image

    rmr 

    8 years ago from Livonia, MI

    You got me. My wife calls me a tool junky. I can't even get my car in the garage because it won't fit in there with my toolbox lol. Hmm, maybe a bigger garage should be my next project.

  • Grant's World profile imageAUTHOR

    Grant Handford 

    8 years ago from Canada

    agvulpes that is really interesting that the same products are called different things. I think what you are calling plaster edging is called crown molding here in morth america. well I have to thank you also for educating me.

    Hi rmr I have a craftsman one that I bought about a year ago that I have never used. I dug it out after I read your comment haha. I will have to see what kind of trouble I can get into with it. You sound like me in the way that you probably have a ton of tools kickin around to play with. I really enjoy doing renovations.

    cheers.

  • rmr profile image

    rmr 

    8 years ago from Livonia, MI

    This is one of my favorite tools! Sometimes I go into the garage and play with it, just for fun. I also have a similar model, made by Craftsman, that works pretty well; and a smaller Dremel that I use for wood carving.

    With the right router bits (and a steady hand), I've found that the Craftsman model is also good for making roundovers and dadoes on wood projects.

  • agvulpes profile image

    Peter 

    8 years ago from Australia

    Oh yeah gotcha! Your 'baseboard' we call 'skirting' and the 'casing' is here called 'architrave' (no idea why)?

    The plaster edging where the ceiling meets the wall is called 'cornice'. Grant thanks for the education :-)

  • Grant's World profile imageAUTHOR

    Grant Handford 

    8 years ago from Canada

    agvulpes the baseboard is the trim that goes at the bottom of the wall on top of the floor around the perimeter of the room. The casing is the trim around the windows and doors on the wall area. That make sense?

  • agvulpes profile image

    Peter 

    8 years ago from Australia

    Grant, great to hear, our terminology must be different. What is 'casing' and 'baseboard' ?

  • Grant's World profile imageAUTHOR

    Grant Handford 

    8 years ago from Canada

    Hi earnestshub it easy to use and saves time versus using a keyhole saw. Thanks for the comment.

    agvulpes in Canada Rotozip is also called a rotary or spiral bit saw. My experience was good yes. I am just putting on baseboard and casing now. Thanks for reading my Hub.

    Cheers.

  • agvulpes profile image

    Peter 

    8 years ago from Australia

    Grant's World, in Australia these Rotozip tools are referred to as "Rotary Saws" or "Spiral Bit Saws" and they are certainly ideal for the use you are talking about in your excellent Hub.

    The Dremel is a much smaller tool and is good for small hobby work but would not last long at all in the Dry Wall application like yours.

    btw In Australia , the home of dry wall it is called "Plaster Board"

    I love working with this product and have used it quite extensively.

    I hope your experience was a good one :-)

  • earnestshub profile image

    earnestshub 

    8 years ago from Melbourne Australia

    The Rotozip looks pretty easy to use. I would try one I reckon.

  • Grant's World profile imageAUTHOR

    Grant Handford 

    8 years ago from Canada

    actually Relica I am not sure a dremel uses the same type of bit that a rotozip would use. Correct me if I am wrong but i think Dremel only uses grinding sanding and buffing type bits. I will have to google it and see.

  • Grant's World profile imageAUTHOR

    Grant Handford 

    8 years ago from Canada

    hi relica,

    Dremel is a brand name and they are more commonly known for their rotary tools aka the Dremel rotary tool which yes is like a Rotozip.

    I think a Rotozip is used more by professionals.

    Thanks for the question.

  • relica profile image

    relica 

    8 years ago from California

    Is Rotozip basically a Dremel tool?

working

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