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How To Use Clorox To Drain A Clogged Tub

Updated on April 7, 2016
Nightcat profile image

Nightcat is a Jane of all trades and likes to pass on tips she’s found useful around the home.

Working drains, wheeee!

I'll admit it. My ability to keep up with household chores is on par with that of a dead mouse. My philosophy being that if it is barely working, don't fix it. But recently my tub stopped up and I had no money to call a plumber. The method below worked for me and may work for you, but please read the thoughtful disclaimer.

DISCLIAMER: I am not a certified plumber. This method combines two of my loving aunty's rather annoying, er, I mean extremely helpful ideas into one useful kit and kaboodle. Never use any household product in a manner not suggested in the bottle, never try spa baths in your own home if you don't want to clean the God awful mess out of your tub I did.

Intro photo is my own. If for some strange reason you wish to copy, feel free, just give credit where credit is due and a link back.

This lens is now archived on How To Create A Short Content Packed Lens (And Why You Should).


Please Note: I have recently been informed by Hubpages that this original content, written by me, has been stolen and is being used on another site. As it has been impossible to contact the party that stole it or even the host website I am asking here and now that this stolen content please be removed.

Clorox! - Cleaning on the cheap!

Clorox is gentle enough to use in diluted forms as baths for certain skin ailments, but I use it for everything else under the sun. One bottle replaces harsh and hazardous drain cleaners, toilet bowl cleaners, bathroom cleaners, you get the picture.

Just wear gloves and old clothes and spot test surfaces for color fastness as you clean. I orders six bottles, two each for the areas I clean most often.

Clorox Liquid Bleach, Regular, 96-Fluid Ounce Bottles (Pack of 6)
Clorox Liquid Bleach, Regular, 96-Fluid Ounce Bottles (Pack of 6)

I couldn't be happier with my six bottles and I use it everywhere and to replace drain cleaners and other products! TIP: Read the label! Clorox is powerful enough to require being flushed out of your pipes. If you have ever dissolved white clothes with too much bleach you hear me.

 

How To Use Clorox To Drain A Clogged Tub

Cleaning the Clogged Tub

You'll Need:

Hot Water

A plunger

Clorox Bleach

Please note: This method only works if you have already plunged the drain to the point where water drains, however slowly. If it refuses to drain at all I suggest Draino or another powerful cleaner. The drain was taking several hours to drain a full tub at the time the method was used. After it drained in under three minutes.

  1. Once the tub is drained pour one cup steaming hot water into the drain. My stopper will not come out, so I just kept it open and poured around it. Plunge. Clean up any debris that comes up, and be warned it will not smell pretty. This step will take a while to drain.
  2. Pour in Clorox, about one cup, let stand five to fifteen minutes. Plunge again, cleaning up any debris, let drain. Try to ignore the smell. Now you know why plumbers charge so much, don't you?
  3. Pour in one cup steaming hot water to flush to Clorox from your pipes. DO NOT skip this step. You don't want the Clorox sitting in your pipes. Plunge if needed, let drain.
  4. Several hours later, repeat steps one through three, plunging if needed. The water on the last step should drain quickly. You might smell a soap smell as any soap clogging your pipes is melted away by the hot water and Clorox. You'll know it worked if your tub roars like thunder the next time it drains. I hadn't heard that sound in years!

Things that clog drains:

Human or animal hair, soap, dirt from your bath, face mask clay, dirt from your outdoor chores, anything and everything. I found leaves from a spa treatment bag I thought I'd tied tightly, hair, soap residue and strange bits of stuff that looked like moss. Gross!

You may also need:

Don't have everything? Get it right here!

Neiko 60166A Toilet Plunger with Patented All-Angle Design | Heavy Duty | Aluminum Handle
Neiko 60166A Toilet Plunger with Patented All-Angle Design | Heavy Duty | Aluminum Handle

Basic, but gets the job done. You will need a plunger at some point around the house. Clogged sinks, toilets, showers, other drains. Not the most glam of tools, but they do come in chic and even spooky designs.

 
Playtex HandSaver Gloves: Medium, 1 Pair
Playtex HandSaver Gloves: Medium, 1 Pair

Good for most household chores. You seriously do need some type of gloves. Do not learn the hard way and end up with skin or nail damage. Especially if the label says to wear gloves, wear them.

 
Drano Snake Plus Tool + Gel System
Drano Snake Plus Tool + Gel System

When all else fails Draino works. There are countless types of Draino for specialized clogs, so try and suss out your problem and get the right tool for the job.

 

Cleaning the bathtub

Want to go green? You can also try...

Try boiling water first to help melt fatty, greasy clogs. Hot water can also help keep pipes open after clogs have been removed. You may also try baking soda and white vinegar in a pinch.

Ho do you clean clogged drains?

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    • Nightcat profile image
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      Nightcat 2 years ago

      It should, it is bleach and if you've ever used too much bleach you know it can eat through fabric in a hurry, which is why they tell you on the bottle to flush after so long. The most common problem I have with the drains is soap scum, facial masks or hair and it will eat through all of those quite well, though depending on the severity of the blockage it may take more than one treatment. The boiling hot water helps as well, melting fatty deposits and helping flush them out. Thanks for visiting!

    • profile image

      Sergio Freddson 2 years ago

      I had no idea that you could use clorox in a drain! How does this work? Does it actually dissolve blockages? I feel better about using clorox anyway because I use it to clean so many other things around the house. I don't like keeping draino on hand because of how harmful it can be. Thanks for sharing your expertise with us! http://www.mikesdrainandplumbing.com/drain-cleanin...

    • Nightcat profile image
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      Nightcat 3 years ago

      @sha-ron: Thanks for the tips, sha-ron . :)

    • sha-ron profile image

      sha-ron 3 years ago

      I always use drano or drainex. Simply because if bleach is leaked out into your garden it will kill what ever plants it comes in contact with. Yes I know that a drain should not go onto garden but it is amazing how many people have outlets into their yards. Great lens

    • Nightcat profile image
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      Nightcat 3 years ago

      @Spoza_di_Serpente: Thank you, Spoza_di_Serpente! Natural is certainly the safest option and often the cheapest as well, thank you so much for sharing! :)

    • profile image

      Spoza_di_Serpente 3 years ago

      It helps to get one of those long brushes and remove the drain cover and use it in there. You have to cut the disgusting hair off the guard first and pull it out if possible and throw it away, then use the brush. That speeds the draining process dramatically. It also keeps the hair clogs from moving farther down into the line. Also, pouring white vinegar down them helps dissolve the greasy stuff.

    • Nightcat profile image
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      Nightcat 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I wish I knew! This grunt hates the design. It makes it a son of a gun to clean, I'll tell you that much. Grunt is shorthand for working grunt. I was a teamster once and picked up all sort of useful wirds, lol! Not the exciting type of teamster either, just a grunt with a broom.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @Nightcat: Now, I wonder why they would have a stopper underneath the tub. Some kind of safety feature maybe? Or, maybe its so the "grunts" will have work to do.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I really don't often have clogged drains and the only problem one from time to time is the clog of hair in the tub....I just use a small long brush that I twist and out it comes....I've never had a clog as interesting as your sounds with the moss looking stuff. For those wanting to clean out a clog, you seem to have the recipe for making one with the spa treatment. Now, I wonder what kind of drains spas have, must be something special. Sounds like you've made chlorine bleach as your go to product and its great when used safely. Once, years ago I was doing some cleaning for someone and I was doing a bathroom where the boys had missed their target several times. Well, without thinking and maybe not knowing it could be dangerous, I dumped some bleach right on the floor. You can probably imagine what happened...the bleach reacted with the dry urine on the floor with a strong ammonia smell that filled the building.....had to get all the windows open, will never do that again!

    • Nightcat profile image
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      Nightcat 4 years ago

      @Sherry B19: I never would have either, sherry-b! My aunty is tickled pink that her advice can be seen around the world now. Thanks for visiting, hugs! :)

    • Sherry B19 profile image

      Sherry B19 4 years ago

      Thanks for sharing! I'll have to give this a try the next time my tub is draining too slow! Never thought of using it to clean clogged drains.

    • Nightcat profile image
      Author

      Nightcat 4 years ago

      @Sara2901: Hi, bestwebfinds. If you scroll down several readers made all natuarl suggestions. Thanks for visiting, hugs! :)

    • Sara2901 profile image

      Sara2901 4 years ago

      I just wish there were safer greener ways to do all these without having to use chemicals around the house especially with children around

    • Nightcat profile image
      Author

      Nightcat 4 years ago

      @Glenda Motsavage: Thank you, healinghands123! I use it in the toliet for cleaning, leaving it overnight, so I guess it would work there for clogs as well. Thanks for visiting. Hugs! :)

    • Nightcat profile image
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      Nightcat 4 years ago

      @Grandma-Marilyn: Thank you, grandmamarilyn! Hugs! :)

    • Glenda Motsavage profile image

      Glenda Motsavage 4 years ago from The Sunshine State

      My husband uses Baking Soda for the bathroom sinks - works very well. I would definitely try Clorox as an alternative. I'm wondering if this would work in the toilet as well? Thanks for sharing this practical advice, and congrats on the "short lens" Purple Star award!

    • Grandma-Marilyn profile image

      Grandma-Marilyn 4 years ago

      Great use for bleach. Would have never thought of it.

    • Nightcat profile image
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      Nightcat 4 years ago

      @happy-birthday: My pleaure, mrjones123! I honestly have to thank my aunt, She had both ideas, lol! Thanks for the visit and comment, hugs! :)

    • happy-birthday profile image

      Birthday Wishes 4 years ago from Here

      I use a random product from the store, but this one seems very good. Thanks a lot for sharing! Nice lens!

    • Nightcat profile image
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      Nightcat 4 years ago

      @AcornOakForest: My pleasure, KampSeagull. I'm amazed to see how many ways my readers have of doing the same job. Thanks for sharing and hugs! :)

    • Nightcat profile image
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      Nightcat 4 years ago

      @stylishimo1: Lol, good point, stylishimo! I don't want any readers going to the ER on my account. Thanks for coming back, and of course, hugs to you again. :)

    • Jogalog profile image

      Jogalog 4 years ago

      I just use the plunger. I hate drains though.

    • AcornOakForest profile image

      Monica Lobenstein 4 years ago from Western Wisconsin

      I use baking soda and vinegar typo, and a little old fashioned elbow grease. Thanks for this quick tutorial!

    • stylishimo1 profile image

      stylishimo1 4 years ago

      @Nightcat: Thanks :) and hugs back to you.

      I just came back to say, don't ever do what I did if there are chemicals in the drain, or like you say plastic pipes, would be a disaster with that technique.

    • Nightcat profile image
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      Nightcat 4 years ago

      @empathzone: Thanks for the great advice, empathzone! Thanks for the visit as well, hugs! :)

    • Nightcat profile image
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      Nightcat 4 years ago

      @ian-patrick-716: Yeah, just saw that now, ian-patrick-716. So now there are brief descriptions. I honestly thought that stuff vaporized like it used to, sigh... Thanks for visiting.

    • Nightcat profile image
      Author

      Nightcat 4 years ago

      @stylishimo1: I'm glad it worked, stylishimo! I don't think I'd use it on plastic pipes, but as long as it worked for you that's great! Thanks for the advice and visiting, hugs! :)

    • Nightcat profile image
      Author

      Nightcat 4 years ago

      @Jogalog: Good advice, Jogalog. Sometimes simple is best. Thanks for visiting, hugs! :)

    • empathzone profile image

      empathzone 4 years ago

      I use kitchen detergent and very hot water. For normal still works like a charm. :)

    • ian-patrick-716 profile image

      ian-patrick-716 4 years ago

      did you know it says "You'll sell more, faster. If you type a sentence here about why you love this item." under each amazon module? Anyway great lens though

    • stylishimo1 profile image

      stylishimo1 4 years ago

      I'm not sure I should say as it might not be safe, it involves lighter fluid, and a lighter. It was the only thing I could do to clear inside a hair blocked bath drain. I tried everything even hoovering inside the drain, pulling loads of it out with a bent coat hanger, then I had the lighter fluid idea (I only used a tiny bit) and it worked, but maybe unsafe (perhaps cause an explosion inside the pipe? I am not a scientist) which is why I just used a really small amount of it.

    • Nightcat profile image
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      Nightcat 4 years ago

      @bornot2b1: Thanks so very much for sharing the great advice, 2b_ornot_2b! Thanks for visiting, hugs! :)

    • bornot2b1 profile image

      bornot2b1 4 years ago

      We got that problem with the kitchen sink once. I was only a teenager (at a boarding house), but no one seemed to care (no chemicals around to help either) , and being my father's daughter, I just disconnected the pipe (or whatever they called that part that link to the drain), & stopped breathing, & manually dug out all the offending yukky stuff... Ugh! (And that kitchen sink never caused us trouble again for years afterward). Thanks for your lens, very good info.

    • Nightcat profile image
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      Nightcat 4 years ago

      @junecampbell: Aww, thanks nightcats! I had it on hand and darn if the directions for using on drains aren't right there on the label. Thanks for visiting, hugs! :)

    • Nightcat profile image
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      Nightcat 4 years ago

      @chi kung: Thank you, chi_kung! Hugs! :)

    • junecampbell profile image

      June Campbell 4 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      first I try Drano, which usually doesn't work, and then I go at it with a plunger, which always does work. I will try Clorox next time.

    • chi kung profile image

      chi kung 4 years ago

      baking soda and vinegar does wonders together with a plunger!