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Grow Your Own Luffa Sponge

Updated on August 18, 2014

What in the world is a luffa?

Grow your own luffa sponge? It's easier than you think, and I'll show you how. Read on...

In 2010 I met a lovely lady named Gail. She has all kinds of unique things growing in her city garden. One day I noticed these big beautiful yellow flowers all over her chain link fence. When she took me over to see her plants she pointed out that they were luffa sponge plants. From a distance I didn't notice the luffas, but they were abundant on her vines.

I was so fascinated with the fact that she grew these sponges and wanted to grow my own. Gail was kind enough to share her seeds with me from one pod so I could grow them in 2011. One gourd provided over 200 seeds, enough for me to sow to others. Let me show you how you too can grow your own luffa sponges, and have enough left over to give them as gifts. Once you have grown your own luffa sponge, you'll want to keep growing them.

Image by Wikipedia

Copyrighted Material by Favored1. Do not copy. Photo credit by Favored1 or Amazon unless otherwise noted. This artwork is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License. When used: Animation by www.glitter-graphics.com, www.picgifts.com, www.photobucket.com and www.animateit.net

 

Bumblebee on luffa flower google images by butterfliesandwildlife
Bumblebee on luffa flower google images by butterfliesandwildlife

Luffa's take a long time to grow... a very, long time!

From the beginning you need to know this:

Wow! Grow your own luffa sponge! That sounds like fun, but here's the topper. The time it takes for luffa to mature from growing, to fllowering and full maturity can take anywhere form 13 days up to as many as 220 plus days. It all depends of the individual plant.

This isn't a plant that likes to be rushed. The reward for your patience is a bounty of yellow flowers all summer and early fall. The lush, rich green leaves make a nice hedge-type covering, privacy fence that in time bears loads of gourds. So with that in mind, let's get started.

What can we expect?

The seedlings will grow very slow at first until the roots develop. Once they start to make a vine, they grow rather quickly. After a months of growing, you will see clusters of yellow flowers. More flowers bloom as the vine gets longer. The thick stems are the female flowers and the thin stems are the males. Bumblebees and other bugs love luffa flowers and will seek them out even if they have to go a long ways to find them. I didn't realize that ants caused little or no harm, but actually assist in the pollination.

All through the season it is normal for some flowers to fall off, but the pollinated flowers are the ones that will form the luffas. They grow out of the flower. It is so neat to see this happen. I have a photo of it on this page.

Photo google images by butterfliesandwildlife

luffa seeds google images by luffa net
luffa seeds google images by luffa net

Selecting the Right Seeds

Luffa seeds look a lot like a watermelon seed. You need to select mature seeds that are dark and hard. Gray or whitish seeds are immature and too soft and will not grow. This happens when the plant doesn't have a long enough growing season on the vine.

You can plant seeds directly into the ground in warmer climates (check the USDA zones schedule for the best planting time for your region). This is what I do, but some like to start them in pots for better germination. The problem is that if you don't hit it just right in the weather, you usually lose your plant because of the frost in the fall. For me it's better to just plant them in the ground.

Photo google images by luffa info

The scientific names for this plant include

Luffa cylindrica, Luffa aegytpiaca, or Luffa aegyptica.

Have luffas in your yard?

Have you ever grown your own luffa plants? Tell me about it.

See results
Buy loofah/luffa seeds from this site.
Buy loofah/luffa seeds from this site.

If you chose to start your seeds indoors, be careful. Luffas don't do well as transplants and shock easily.

Luffa seedlings google images by lettuceshare
Luffa seedlings google images by lettuceshare

Starting Seeds Indoors

Once the plant has a few good sized leaves the luffa is big enough to transplant. The roots by this time may be about 6 inches long or longer and that would be about right for them to be put in the ground. Be sure that the danger of frost is over and the soil is warm. The night air that is sometimes cooler won't hurt them, but an extended cold spell can stop their growth. You may want to set them outside in the daytime and bring them in at night at first.

Remember "transplant shock" sometimes happens to the luffa, so be careful when you do this. Leaving the plants outside a couple days before planting helps them to adapt. Even a little wind will help them to become more sturdy. This plant does fine in many types of soil as long as it drains well.

Photo google images by lettuceshare

Not an ocean plant!

The luffa is actually a vegetable

and part of the gourd family.

It grows on a vine from the ground!

Luffs seedlings google images by morning-glorious
Luffs seedlings google images by morning-glorious

Instructions to Planting Your Seeds in the Ground

Choose a sunny location.

Plant 3 to 4 seeds per area, about 1/2 inch deep in small hills of soil. Space hills a minimum of 3 feet apart, but if you have room make it about 6 feet. These plants need a lot of room as they do spread out a great deal.

The soil temperature must be around 70 degrees F (21C) or warmer for seeds and plants to grow.

Photo google images by morning-glorious

Luffa in pots google images by vegarden
Luffa in pots google images by vegarden

Select your sunny location.

Luffa plants grow slower than most gourds. It can take weeks before you see any real growth. They are a hot weather plant and grow slower in cool weather. The flowers appear over the entire growing time as the vines get longer.

Once the gourd starts to form it may take a long time to produce the fiberous part of the vegetable, and ever more time to completely dry inside for the harvest. This is where patience comes in. Your plants won't be ready to havest until the middle of fall (about November depending on your region). The final peeling and cleaning the sponges follow the harvesting of the gourds. Your plant will need about 140 to 200 or more frost free days, depending on the your geographical location and the type of gourd you grow. They spend a lot of time on the vine.

Be sure to plant your luffa's in a sunny location and near a strong fence or trellis. They need to have something to climb on so the gourds can hang straight. Your plants will grow in an area on the ground that is weed free, but they won't look as nice and will turn out curvy or bumpy. That will make them more difficult to cut into nice sections or give them as gifts. So try to get them to grow up a fence of some sort if you can.

Photo google images by vegarden

The harvest is in the seed. Left unplanted it will never grow. We plant the seed, God makes it grow! (1 Corinthians 3:6 kjv)

Giant Luffa Plants by Seed Gallery - How cool is this? Mine didn't get this big, but yours could!

Luffa Plants: Photo google image by seed gallery
Luffa Plants: Photo google image by seed gallery
luffa 90 days in pot
luffa 90 days in pot

Container Planting Directions

They must be staked well for this to work.

Potted plants: Plant 3 or 4 seeds about 1/2 to 3/4 inch deep in some potting soil. The time they take to germinat depends on the type of soil you use and the temperature, so place pots in a sunny place. Keep the soil moist but not too wet. Don't get discouraged about the germination time because it varies. It could take three weeks or longer in warm soil. Usually it is less than 10 days they say, but mine took longer.

As you can see from the photo this plant is rather small even after 90 days of growing. Some seeds may take much longer than others from the same batch. Thin plants to one per pot or planting location, because they will need all the room they can get. I have a hard time doing this because I want to save them all. But once the roots finally get established they grow quickly, so thin them out early.

If you decide to grow luffas in containers and not transplant them, make sure they are around 5 gallons in size. The containers need good drainage and should be in the location you want them, because they can't be moved once the vines attach tendrils (long stingy things that wrap themselves around anything) to other objects. Professional growers recomment that the ideal soil ph for the luffa is neutral to slightly alkaline and you might need to add some lime soils that are more acidic. You will need to stake your vines so the tendrils have something to grab on to for stability.

Photo google image

Don't forget this...

Make sure that the containers have good drainage and are in the location you want them, because they can't be moved once the vines attach tendrils to other objects.

Growing loofahs at home. - A fun family project.

If video isn't working click on this link to view.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3H8o8486uwk

My luffa/loofa plants of 2011. - These are photos of my luffa sponge gourds, also known as loofahs, loofah sponge, loofa, loofah, loufa, sponge gourd.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
I grew these luffa plants to climb on a wire fence in several areas of my yard for the first time in 2011. Here they were almost ready to harvest.My Luffa growing on the fence facing the east and got plenty of morning and afternoon sun. There were only about 4-6 plants that covered the fence.Luffa plants take off and will overtake anything around them. Sorry about the blurriness.This luffa was about to be harvested when the frost hit. You can see it was turning brown at the top.I covered the plants with light plastic at night to protect the remaining plants. Keep them on the vine as long as possible.The leaves were already brown and mostly dropped off the vine, but I still had loofas drying.  Off the vine they will not grow or ripen.One luffa is peeled and a few of the seeds are on the napkin. You can get hundreds of seeds from one gourd, which is enough for the following season.
I grew these luffa plants to climb on a wire fence in several areas of my yard for the first time in 2011. Here they were almost ready to harvest.
I grew these luffa plants to climb on a wire fence in several areas of my yard for the first time in 2011. Here they were almost ready to harvest.
My Luffa growing on the fence facing the east and got plenty of morning and afternoon sun. There were only about 4-6 plants that covered the fence.
My Luffa growing on the fence facing the east and got plenty of morning and afternoon sun. There were only about 4-6 plants that covered the fence.
Luffa plants take off and will overtake anything around them. Sorry about the blurriness.
Luffa plants take off and will overtake anything around them. Sorry about the blurriness.
This luffa was about to be harvested when the frost hit. You can see it was turning brown at the top.
This luffa was about to be harvested when the frost hit. You can see it was turning brown at the top.
I covered the plants with light plastic at night to protect the remaining plants. Keep them on the vine as long as possible.
I covered the plants with light plastic at night to protect the remaining plants. Keep them on the vine as long as possible.
The leaves were already brown and mostly dropped off the vine, but I still had loofas drying.  Off the vine they will not grow or ripen.
The leaves were already brown and mostly dropped off the vine, but I still had loofas drying. Off the vine they will not grow or ripen.
One luffa is peeled and a few of the seeds are on the napkin. You can get hundreds of seeds from one gourd, which is enough for the following season.
One luffa is peeled and a few of the seeds are on the napkin. You can get hundreds of seeds from one gourd, which is enough for the following season.
Photo by Favored1
Photo by Favored1

It's Harvest Time!

Now that your luffas have hung on the fence all summer, they should begin to turn brown and be hard. The plant is ready to take off the vine when the luffa feels very light as if the sponge has separated from the shell. You can hear the seeds rattle inside the gourd like a moraca.

Cut the gourd from the vine and put it inside to dry. It may take several months to be completely dry. As you can see I hung this one on a towel rack. It worked great and was out of the way.

Photo by Favored1

Kitties love luffa sponges for toys.  (Photo google images by luvaloofah)
Kitties love luffa sponges for toys. (Photo google images by luvaloofah)

Watch & Learn

Luffa Harvest and Sponge Care

Each one of these videos I have selected will help you in your luffa project. It is well worth your while to view each of these short clips on luffa growing to maintaining your luffa sponge. Enjoy.

Start to Finish: Growing A Luffa Plant - Click on photo for information.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Beautiful yellow flowers cover the fence. (photo google images by jadeinstitute)The luffa/gourd begins to form from the base of the flower. (Photo google images by blogstoday)Sponge is dry and ready to peel. (Photo google images by debsgardens)Cut into 1 inch pieces to use as is or flatten the luffa and cut into desired lengths. Watch the video. (Photo google images by Davesgarden)Cut sponges into different shapes and sizes when they are wet if you are not cutting a flattened sponge.(Photo google images by David Fisher)Make a flat sponge: smash sponge when wet, lay something on it to keep it down. Thread cord through a seed hole and tie in a knot for hanging.You can create all kinds of things with your sponges. (Above Photo google images by seed gallery)
Beautiful yellow flowers cover the fence. (photo google images by jadeinstitute)
Beautiful yellow flowers cover the fence. (photo google images by jadeinstitute)
The luffa/gourd begins to form from the base of the flower. (Photo google images by blogstoday)
The luffa/gourd begins to form from the base of the flower. (Photo google images by blogstoday)
Sponge is dry and ready to peel. (Photo google images by debsgardens)
Sponge is dry and ready to peel. (Photo google images by debsgardens)
Cut into 1 inch pieces to use as is or flatten the luffa and cut into desired lengths. Watch the video. (Photo google images by Davesgarden)
Cut into 1 inch pieces to use as is or flatten the luffa and cut into desired lengths. Watch the video. (Photo google images by Davesgarden)
Cut sponges into different shapes and sizes when they are wet if you are not cutting a flattened sponge.(Photo google images by David Fisher)
Cut sponges into different shapes and sizes when they are wet if you are not cutting a flattened sponge.(Photo google images by David Fisher)
Make a flat sponge: smash sponge when wet, lay something on it to keep it down. Thread cord through a seed hole and tie in a knot for hanging.
Make a flat sponge: smash sponge when wet, lay something on it to keep it down. Thread cord through a seed hole and tie in a knot for hanging.
You can create all kinds of things with your sponges. (Above Photo google images by seed gallery)
You can create all kinds of things with your sponges. (Above Photo google images by seed gallery)

More fun with Luffas!

Use your natural luffa

as an exfoliant in your

homemade soap.

Soap Making

Have you ever made homemade soaps for yourself or as gifts? How did they turn out?

See results
Give beautiful luffa sponge soaps gifts. (Photo google images by the craftygarden)
Give beautiful luffa sponge soaps gifts. (Photo google images by the craftygarden)

Make your own luffa/loofah soap.

I love my loofas and wanted to make soap using them as gifts. This video really shows an easy way to do it. Also I have included more information from the Soap Queen videos that might help you on future projects. You may also like these links.

http://www.brambleberry.com author of Soap Queen Blog

http://www.soapqueen.com and developer of Teach Soap

http://www.teachsoap.com

What you'll need to make

luffa/loofah gift soaps.

Hydrated chrome green oxide

can be found at

www.brambleberry.com

 

Gonna give it a try?

After viewing how easy it is to make luffa soaps, are you going to give it a try?

See results

Look what you can do with your luffa sponges.

Luffa Painting

If you're like me, you love to design your own walls and sometimes use various shaped sponges to do it. Luffa painting is much like regular sponge painting. You can cut the sponge long ways like in this video or in round 1 inch pieces for a different look. Whatever way you choose to do it, you're sure to have fun.

Click on this link if video is not working.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Ya9KIoRFb9I

Don't have time to make or grow your own? Get all you need right here.

Are luffas in your future?

Will you be growing your own luffas after seeing how easy it is?

See results

"He who gives seed for the sower and bread for eating will also provide and multiply your seed for sowing, and increase the fruits of your righteousness."

(2 Corinthians 9:10 kjv)

Latest Update

UPDATE for my 2012 plants: As of August 24th, because of the extreme heat and drought, my luffa plants have not produced any "pods" or sponges. I do have some seeds left over from last year, so we'll see what happens.

UPDATE Ocober 21, 2012: The loofas have made a come back with the lovely fall weather we've been having. I may just get a few sponges after all.

UPDATE March 28, 2013 Well, I've got some new seeds from my friend Gail and am looking forward to planting them very soon. The extremely wet spring didn't allow me to get them planted. Hopefully next year.

UPDATE April 29th, 2014 My seedlings for this year's crop are looking good and are about 8 inches high already. Hopefully, they will be able to go into the ground very soon.

2014 Seedings in Progress - As of July 8th the birds & squirrels have eaten almost all my seedlings. Stay tuned ...

Click thumbnail to view full-size
I planted the seeds on April 13th.  Seeds usually take 2 weeks, but they popped in a few days.Second seedling group planted April 22nd and already growing. I started them in this container and placed them on top of the frig.Removed lid April 29th and in a few days it will can go outside.  Container is can be used for veggie seeds.
I planted the seeds on April 13th.  Seeds usually take 2 weeks, but they popped in a few days.
I planted the seeds on April 13th. Seeds usually take 2 weeks, but they popped in a few days.
Second seedling group planted April 22nd and already growing. I started them in this container and placed them on top of the frig.
Second seedling group planted April 22nd and already growing. I started them in this container and placed them on top of the frig.
Removed lid April 29th and in a few days it will can go outside.  Container is can be used for veggie seeds.
Removed lid April 29th and in a few days it will can go outside. Container is can be used for veggie seeds.

Visit my latest blog post: Daily Favor Blog

I hope this article has prompted you to grow the luffa plant this year. - Did you learn anything new? Will you be making any luffa soap?

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    • favored profile image
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      Fay Favored 14 months ago from USA

      Elsie I'm sorry I didn't see you post until today. My 2015 didn't make it because of the cold, but I've already started my 2016 seeds. I'm hoping I got them in on time since they take so long to germinate. We'll see how they go. I may try experimenting with some indoors, but have to do more research on them to see if it is something doable. My husband is doing better as he gets back into the swing of things. He's still in physical therapy 3 x's a week and that helps. It's so sweet of you to ask about him. I'll pass this on to him. Blessings

    • Elsie Hagley profile image

      Elsie Hagley 23 months ago from New Zealand

      Interesting article.

      I have never heard that word "luffa" before, I thought it looked like a vegetable you could eat, after reading this it looks as though it's not food, still interesting, but I don't think I will try growing it.

      How are your luffa's growing in 2015?

      Blessings and happy days to you.

      Hope your husband is much better now.

    • favored profile image
      Author

      Fay Favored 3 years ago from USA

      @sukkran trichy: Good to see you. Glad you picked up a bit of info as well.

    • sukkran trichy profile image

      sukkran trichy 3 years ago from Trichy/Tamil Nadu

      learned something new from you. thanks for this informative lens about luffa growing.

    • favored profile image
      Author

      Fay Favored 3 years ago from USA

      @tazzytamar: The cats really do love the luffas, and they are safe for them. I give them the ones I can't use or sell. They are still good, but don't look as nice because the color may be darker.

    • tazzytamar profile image

      Anna 3 years ago from chichester

      I had no idea there was so much you could do with these plants! The homemade soap looks great, and the cat photo made me laugh. The giant luffas are really amazing, too!

    • favored profile image
      Author

      Fay Favored 3 years ago from USA

      @VioletteRose LM: You may have seen them but they were called something else. That happens.

    • VioletteRose LM profile image

      VioletteRose LM 3 years ago

      Great lens, thanks for sharing. I have never seen luffa and the soap looks really nice :)

    • favored profile image
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      Fay Favored 3 years ago from USA

      @angelatvs: Thanks for visiting.

    • profile image

      angelatvs 3 years ago

      Really interesting. You have created a well written and informative lens. Thanks!

    • favored profile image
      Author

      Fay Favored 3 years ago from USA

      @Kailua-KonaGirl: Nice to see you June. You can grow these in a large pot if there is some sort of rail for climbing. Great for small areas. My sister grew hers on the balcony.

    • mommysue lm profile image

      mommysue lm 3 years ago

      What a truly interesting lens. I am not sure if I am ready to grow luffas yet, but when I am I know where to find all the information I need. Thank you!

    • Kailua-KonaGirl profile image

      June Parker 3 years ago from New York

      I had not tried growing these gourds when I had a large garden to grow them in. I really enjoyed the information to have provided and am pinning it it to my 'The Garden' board. I would like to be able to find it again when I get back home to Hawaii and start another large garden. I do want to grow them to make my own loofahs.

    • favored profile image
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      Fay Favored 3 years ago from USA

      @smine27: I was thinking about your comment and wondered how to get one to you. They work great. You should make some yourself. Blessings to Tokyo.

    • smine27 profile image

      Shinichi Mine 3 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      I always thought luffas came from the ocean. haha. I would love to get a hold on those luffa soaps.

    • favored profile image
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      Fay Favored 3 years ago from USA

      @cwilson360: Thanks. Yep, I just discovered that a few years ago. Pretty cool.

    • cwilson360 profile image

      cwilson360 3 years ago

      Wow this is one of the coolest lenses I have ever read. I never knew that's how luffa's were made!

    • favored profile image
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      Fay Favored 3 years ago from USA

      @VladimirCat: Yes, but I have never eaten them. Thank you for visiting.

    • VladimirCat profile image

      Vladimir 3 years ago from Australia

      I'm not too sure what a luffa is. Can you eat them?

    • Fran Tollett profile image

      Fran Tollett 4 years ago

      I live in the desert southwest. I hope they grow well here :-)

    • Mamabyrd profile image

      Mamabyrd 4 years ago

      I can't wait for spring. I have high hopes for a garden this year and now I know what plant I'm going to experiment with, a luffa plant. Thank you for the instructions and the photos!

    • profile image

      getmoreinfo 4 years ago

      Thanks for the tips with Instructions on how to Grow a Luffa Plant.

    • MBurgess profile image

      Maria Burgess 4 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      I enjoyed visiting this lens very much! Thanks for sharing all this great information about loofas! =)

    • GardenIdeasHub LM profile image

      GardenIdeasHub LM 4 years ago

      Very interesting plant. Thanks for the ideas about growing luffa sponge. I think it will really help me.

    • profile image

      miaponzo 4 years ago

      Wow! What a fun lens and lots of project ideas here!!!! I have seen these plants and the whole loofah pods in Mexico (when I lived there)... I didn't realize that people could actually grow them.. what I great idea... I'm going to have to try this! Blessed!

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Luffa sponge seem like an exciting plant to grow and having listed so many creative projects with it, it is definitely worth growing.

    • Camden1 profile image

      Camden1 4 years ago

      I didn't even know luffas were plants! Growing them would be a fun project for kids.

    • Linda BookLady profile image

      Linda Jo Martin 4 years ago from Post Falls, Idaho, USA

      I'm looking forward to growing my own luffa sponge plants now. Thanks for all the helpful advice!

    • aesta1 profile image

      Mary Norton 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      I just pinned it for ideas on making luffa soaps. I really enjoyed using them.

    • aesta1 profile image

      Mary Norton 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      We have luffa in our backyard in the Philippines and we use it as vegetable when the fruit is young.

    • favored profile image
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      Fay Favored 4 years ago from USA

      @flinnie lm: Thank you for the blessing. It's good to see you.

    • flinnie lm profile image

      Gloria Freeman 4 years ago from Alabama USA

      This is great, thanks for sharing. Blessings.

    • favored profile image
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      Fay Favored 4 years ago from USA

      @lovetolink: Thank you. I did notice some small luffas trying to make a come back, so maybe if I have 2 good months there will be a few smaller ones to harvest.

    • lovetolink profile image

      lovetolink 4 years ago

      Wow, super lens! I just might try this next year! Sorry about your 2012 season. I hope next year is more successful :)

    • profile image

      pawpaw911 5 years ago

      Very interesting idea. I might have to give it a try.

    • kerbev profile image

      kab 5 years ago from Upstate, NY

      I'm not the gardening type myself, but I learned something new.

    • LiteraryMind profile image

      Ellen Gregory 5 years ago from Connecticut, USA

      Fascinating. I always thought a loofah was some sort of sea vegetable. This is very enlightening.

    • Johanna Eisler profile image

      Johanna Eisler 5 years ago

      My aunt used to grow these, but I had forgotten all about them. Wish I had a good place to plant them! :)

    • erin-elise profile image

      erin-elise 5 years ago

      I am looking forward to trying this. I never knew until recently that they are a plant, that's so cool that you can just grow them yourself. I'm going to get some seeds and get going on this as soon as I can. How fun! Nice lens!

    • LittleLindaPinda profile image

      Little Linda Pinda 5 years ago from Florida

      Who knew. Thank you. You think of such great articles to write about.

    • Sylvestermouse profile image

      Cynthia Sylvestermouse 5 years ago from United States

      Well now, how cool is this!!! I had no idea I could grow my own luffas! The little flower is pretty too :)

    • profile image

      FashionMommy 5 years ago

      Oh so that's how a Luffa plant looks like, I've never seen one before. I like using luffa sponge though. Great lens, I learned a lot of new information.

    • SailingPassion LM profile image

      SailingPassion LM 5 years ago

      Amazing - had no idea!

    • Hypersapien2 profile image

      Hypersapien2 5 years ago from U.S.

      Wow! It never even occurred to me that you could do this!

    • WriterJanis2 profile image

      WriterJanis2 5 years ago

      I didn't know any of this! Love the kitten photo. You presented this so nicely. Blessed!

    • iijuan12 profile image

      iijuan12 5 years ago from Florida

      Neat! I never knew where they came from. This could be a fun family activity for our next planting season.

    • Millionairemomma profile image

      Millionairemomma 5 years ago

      From ths I learned where luffa sponges come from. Loved the photos of your cat!

    • Tracie-Fisher profile image

      Tracie-Fisher 5 years ago

      I really did not know that luffa came from a plant on dry ground ;-) Thanks for a very nice lesson.

    • iWrite4 profile image

      iWrite4 5 years ago

      very interesting lens. i love luffa :)

    • BLouw profile image

      Barbara Walton 5 years ago from France

      I must say that I never gave luffas much thought but I feel enlightened now! who'd have thought they were like cucumbers. Would love to grow them.

    • darciefrench lm profile image

      darciefrench lm 5 years ago

      What a fun and engaging article on how to make your own luffa soap. I also learned how to spell luffa :) Angel blessed.

    • ajgodinho profile image

      Anthony Godinho 5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Wow, this is a wonderful lens. I've used luffa sponges, but just never knew where they came from. I used to do a lot of gardening when I was in my teens, but haven't done so in many years now. Thanks for sharing this...pretty cool...stay blessed! :)

    • profile image

      julieannbrady 5 years ago

      My neighbor just called me this past weekend to chat ... and we talked about doing a mutual garden out back between our yards ... I'll have to ask her if she's into trying luffa!

    • KimGiancaterino profile image

      KimGiancaterino 5 years ago

      I have a couple of arches where luffa vines might work. They're interesting and definitely worth a try.

    • mythphile profile image

      Ellen Brundige 5 years ago from California

      Wow, I'll have to add this to my tiny garden, if I can. Great idea!

    • goo2eyes lm profile image

      goo2eyes lm 5 years ago

      blessings and this lens made me homesick. try luffa with ginger chicken.

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      goo2eyes lm 5 years ago

      this year, i can't plant but probably next year, i can. i am planting the cousin of luffa. it's also coming from a gourd family. luffa's name in our language is patola.

    • TapIn2U profile image

      TapIn2U 5 years ago

      It's amazing how luffa plants could grow. Sundae ;-)

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      Ruthi 5 years ago

      How fascinating to discover the luffa sponge is a plant I could grow. I really thought this sponge was harvested from the ocean. Your luffa gourds have my blessings and a bit o' sunshine.

    • Aquavel profile image

      Aquavel 5 years ago

      This is amazing to me. I've used luffas in the shower/bath and many times for faux painting. I always thought these sponges grew underwater. I thought that all sponges did. Educational lens with awesome picts and instructions for growing our own!

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      I just got an education from you once again, Fay. This is so interesting to me. I would really like to grow some luffa and make my own soap. This is such a fun lens. ~ Blessed and well deserved!

    • Linda Pogue profile image

      Linda Pogue 5 years ago from Missouri

      I had no idea luffa was a land plant. I thought it was an ocean plant. Thanks for enlightening me. Blessings!

    • JohannDog profile image

      Johann The Dog 5 years ago from Northeast Georgia

      Wow, very interesting!!! May have to have my Mum try to grow these!

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