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Underground Bunkers for Survivalists

Updated on July 8, 2016

Why Would I Want a House Underground

Can you imagine living beneath the surface of the Earth? Hundreds, maybe even thousands of people live beneathe the surface and there are many reasons why:

The first reason to move underground is for efficiency. A house underground is cooler in the summer time and warmer in the wintertime. You can save money on electricity and gas bills.

The second reason is to protect you from harsh weather. There are hurricanes and tornadoes and all kinds of nasty weather that make people homeless every year. They even kill people. If your house is below the surface of the ground, you'll be protected by the dirt above you.

Finally, you will be protected if the end of the world happens. Nuclear weapons, asteroid impact or whatever. You'll be able to hide underground till the bad stuff has passed. This is the least likely to happen, but it is nice to have that available.

3 Underground Containers - Buried and Safe From the Elements

This is an interesting video about three shipping containers that have been buried underground for emergency use. The guy who is working the project wanted to prove that it could be done. The word on the internet claimed that it was difficult to bury a shipping container. The wall supports were not strong enough to support the weight of the earth pushing in on it. This guy added extra support and buried three shipping containers.

I think it is very well done on a very low budget. He finds ways to seal the compartments and pump the water away from the building. He even digs an escape route in case his front door has been blocked for some reason.

Decommissioned Bunker Turned Home - An Unusual Opportunity

How many of us have the chance to purchase an unusual building and have the foresight to make it into something great. This couple bought a bunker and turned into their home. Now it is a place to live, while drawing a bit of attention and hopefully a little extra income from people who want to tour the house.

I am not sure what I think about letting other people walk through my house, especially when they are people I don't know. I suppose if I could charge for the tour, I might just consider it. That would mean I would have to make sure my house always looked like a million dollars. I guess if I were to refurbish the inside of one of these things, I might actually have to spend nearly a million dollars.

The nice thing about a bunker like this one, it is underground. That means it will stay warm in the winter and cool in the summer. It won't be as extreme when it comes to the temperatures above the ground.

The Fifty Dollar Underground House Book - This is how to build a house underground

A book on building your own subterranean housing. I have always wanted to build my own room or two underground. I wondered if it would be possible to dig a hole under the house through the concrete of the slab. Then dig out the hole and put in some walls and a floor that will be a shelter under the house.

That was a fantasy as a kid. I know this will not work after the house has been built. For one, the house would settle over the hole I dig. That could be bad if the house decided to cave in on a weak spot that I created digging the hole. Second, the concrete that I pour or the cement between the bricks I build down there would have a hard time drying since there is no circulating air. Same would go with wooden framework. The wood would absorb the moisture in the ground and I would have all kinds of problems with mold and collapse.

The Fifty Dollar and Up Underground House Book
The Fifty Dollar and Up Underground House Book

If I were to build something under my house, I would have to build it before I actually build the house. I would have to make sure it is dried in and has plenty of insulation and would not absorb the water in the ground. Then I could build a house on top of it. People do that all the time now. They call it a basement.

 

Bury a Shipping Container - The Cheap Underground Shelter

If you have a few thousand dollars and a little elbow grease, you could bury a shipping container underground to be a shelter. You will need to watch this video to see what your challenges might be, like reinforcing the walls and the ceiling to keep the container from caving in.

You will want to make sure there are vent holes in the ceiling so if you have to stay in the shelter, you will not suffocate. There are several ways to do this, just look up underground vents online.

If anything, I would just take a look at the video. It is just fun to watch.

Small Storm Shelter in Your Garage - When You Don't Have a Basement

These spaces are extremely small and will not be something for people who are claustrophobic. There is also the fact that if a storm does show up and demolish your home, there might be debris on top of your shelter not allowing you to get out when the storm is over. That kind of scares me. This would be the reason most people don't get one of these.

If you can find a way to keep the rest of your house from collapsing on top of your shelter, then I think this would be a great option. That is one reason to have a shelter that has more than one Exit.

Missle Silo Home - You Should See the Size of His Garage

His garage was built to house a small fleet of Military Vehicles. Now he can use that space for just about anything his mind can conceive. This underground building has so much extra space, the owner doesn't really know what to do with it all. I wish I had unlimited resources to design a home in a place like this. There is so much we could do with it.

I wonder what other underground buildings I could buy to live in. There are basements of buildings that might be worth something. I would like to find demolished building with it's basement still intact. Most buildings like this one would be tornado victims.

Living Underground in Las Vegas - Can You Imagine Living in Tunnels?

Not everyone chooses to live underground. Some people are forced to do so. These tunnels in Las Vegas are crawling with homeless who are just trying to survive. These spaces are usually no longer used by the city. The city knows there are people living in them, but they decide it is better to let them live there than have this group of people finding more inappropriate places to sleep in the city.

The tunnels these people are living in were created to divert flash flood waters away from the city. If they were to have a few days of steady rain, all the people in these tunnels will have to leave, most of them losing everything they have collected to make their lives somewhat normal. The likelihood they would get this kind of rain is slim. They are in the dessert. If they are smart, they are listening in on the weather during rainy season. They will know when to evacuate and take their prize possessions with them.

Underground Houses in Australia - This Place is Amazing to Look At.

This people in this city decided to dig into the ground and make their own living situation. Being underground gets you away from the heat. Most of the homes dug into the ground stay around about 70 degrees. It also will let you continue to build onto a house that you can't see from the surface.

about 2/3rds of this town has been built underground. Some people like to show off their dwellings. Most people just want to be left alone. It amazes me. If you were just driving by, you would not even know there were homes there in the desert. They look like a few holes in the ground or stairs leading to nowhere. I hope to make it out there one day to see them for myself.

Why do You Want or Have an Underground Shelter?

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    • jacksson47 profile image

      John Reeder 5 weeks ago from Reedley, CA

      Very interesting, reminds me of the underground gardens in Fresno, Ca. https://hubpages.com/living/Underground-Living-in-...

    • profile image

      thefundraiser 3 years ago

      Very interesting indeed. I've been seriously looking into this and have looked at everything from bunkernetwork.com to vivos.com. Although I think building my own bunker would probably be the best idea...

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @EmergencyPrepar: Living in Florida you are just as likely to be hit by a hurricane as you are a tornado...Good luck either way.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Pretty sure if one is smart enough to build underground one would be smart enough to make sure they don't drown or suffocate.......

    • uneasywriter lm profile image

      uneasywriter lm 4 years ago

      The child still in me says yes! The adult in me says get the tinfoil hat. Cool lens!

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @RoseAEckert: its been done for the last 2 million years since humans have been here Started from caves went to duggouts in the deserts of the middle east and even the catacombs in Europe and Asia nothings change but style and the thought that its dirty to live beneath , most want to be above others not under them

    • RoseAEckert profile image

      RoseAEckert 4 years ago

      underground houses haha, so cool! what will they think of next

    • rgasperson lm profile image
      Author

      Robert T Gasperson 4 years ago from South Carolina

      @anonymous: Some great points. I think I am more interested in the temperature control than I am about being safe from a detonation of some kind of bomb or meteor. Living underground will save a lot of energy if you can keep it dry and the air circulated.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I hope these people considered water infiltration. Hydraulics is one of the biggest issues in underground facilities and basements. It must be 100% waterproof or you will drown. Needs a water pumping system since all water migrates downward into the soil and transports in the ground to lower ponds, rivers/streams, lakes etc. For a bunker to be efficient, it must be several feet underground, in my opinion, at least 10 feet below grade to protect oneself from nuclear impact or meteor impact. Depth will also protect one from radiation of the solar events. Good luck tomb livers, hope you thought of everything.

    • profile image

      David-N 4 years ago

      Really cool lens! I saw the missile silo couple on Doomsday Preppers :)

    • VictoriaKelley profile image

      VictoriaKelley 4 years ago

      Great lens very informative thanks!

    • Katyusha profile image

      Katyusha 4 years ago

      I just nominated your lens on weather related quest:) Great and useful in Sandy days.

    • rgasperson lm profile image
      Author

      Robert T Gasperson 4 years ago from South Carolina

      @Thamisgith: Tell me about it. I have always though getting an underground building would be a great investment no matter what you did with it.

    • profile image

      Thamisgith 4 years ago

      Cool lens. Loved the video of the guy who made a wine cellar from a storage container. Pretty good value for money I would say (even if he did do a lot of the work himself).

    • Ahdilarum profile image

      Ahdilarum 5 years ago

      To escape from enemies, these type of bunkers are safe

    • profile image

      EmergencyPrepar 5 years ago

      We have been "preppers" for years but we live in southwest Florida now and unfortunately don't have basements here. I would never move back north since we love the day to day life here. We are thinking of getting one of those storm shelters to put in garage that held up during strong tornadoes. I don't trust the closet to keep us alive. We just had a small tornado in our town that hit the trailer park so that helped us move up that timetable for the storm shelter.

    • randomthings lm profile image

      randomthings lm 5 years ago

      Very interesting article. So many things I haven't thought about before. We have a basement in our house, so I feel somewhat protected from storms...however, anything bigger than that...i guess we aren't protected. Thanks!

    • Linda Pogue profile image

      Linda Pogue 5 years ago from Missouri

      I would love to have an underground shelter due to the tornadoes in this area. Blessings!

    • profile image

      amythomson187 5 years ago

      These are cool, I just want one so i can hide away from the world when i need some quiet time ;) great informative lens Amy x

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      My aunt in Mississippi just bought a tornado shelter, with all those storms down there now, she wanted to be prepared. She says she loves it and feels so much safer now. She said it was more comfy than shed expected, too. It even has carpeting lol! She found them on this site www.survive-a-storm.com ... pretty neat :)

    • senditondown profile image

      Senditondown 5 years ago from US

      As a tornado shelter.

      You have some interesting things here.

    • TrialError profile image

      TrialError 5 years ago

      Awesome ideas in a great lens.

    • TolovajWordsmith profile image

      Tolovaj Publishing House 5 years ago from Ljubljana

      Sometimes I would love to go underground!

    • davies86 profile image

      davies86 5 years ago

      very interesting lens

    • WriterJanis2 profile image

      WriterJanis2 5 years ago

      Excellent information. This would be very useful for people who live in tornado areas. Great photos, too. Blessed!

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Did you hear about the guy who is converting an Underground Missile Silo into an Undergound Self-contained Living Facility/Apartments!!

      I think that very Cool and different! :D

      It seems that Underground Living Areas are indeed becoming very Popular!

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      @anonymous: please check out my new channel i no longer have access to that account http://www.youtube.com/user/SouthernSurvivalTX

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      hi i recently posted a video of my familys shipping container bunker its is almost finnished check out the youtube link

      http://www.youtube.com/user/TrYaBuRRiTo987

    • Countryluthier profile image

      E L Seaton 6 years ago from Virginia

      Tornadic activity protection. It's just good to know that you can move a few way from your topside home and wait out most storms. Great lens and videos!

    • profile image

      its_easy 6 years ago

      When i become a multi billionaire, I'm going to build my underground house like that of resident evil, without the zombies of course.... maybe one zombie.

    • stylishimo1 profile image

      stylishimo1 6 years ago

      Ooh, I want one, I'm a right worryer, I want one in the basement, and I would make my partner go practice his singing down there too!

      There are some cool missile tunnels? ( I think that's what they are called) for sale on the internet very cheaply,in the USA, you get a kind of james bond tunnel complex, with a domed room in the middle, where the missile used to go. Last time I looked they were only about $50,000!

    • MargoPArrowsmith profile image

      MargoPArrowsmith 6 years ago

      Well done lens, but no one is going to be able to stay underground long enough for the bad stuff to pass, and there won't be anything to come back to

      But, not a bad idea for storms.

      And a very well done lens

    • linhah lm profile image

      Linda Hahn 6 years ago from California

      They are nice to have around when a tornado is on the way.

    • PNWtravels profile image

      Vicki Green 6 years ago from Wandering the Pacific Northwest USA

      Not sure I want an underground shelter, but I could see having one as a root cellar or wine cellar. I remember people having bomb shelters in the 50s and 60s - I wonder what happened to all of them! Interesting info.

    • sousababy profile image

      sousababy 6 years ago

      I was fascinated by this topic some 20 years ago when I heard of someone building a unit within my city. Levels of CO2 are something potentially dangerous (re: movie Apollo 13) as well as the obvious - sanitation/removal of wastes. I doubt I would ever want to be totally encompassed but there are homes built within the sides of hillsides/cliffs that are somewhat protected by the elements AND are well equipped with fresh air/water/plumbing. Indeed, these homeowner save on electricity and heating since the earth provides such a blanket around the home. Well researched!