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A Tour of a Frugal Home

Updated on May 27, 2014

Being True to My Word

I have preached in many articles about the advantages and wisdom of frugal living. I think, in today’s economy, it is not a unique approach to living but the only practical approach.

Things will get worse. Take that promise to the bank and deposit it in your savings account. For many of you, it will be the only thing you deposit in savings this month.

The middle class is shrinking, the poor are increasing, and the top one percent is getting richer. The government is bought and paid for, and legislation continues to be passed that will benefit those who already have economic power. It is true in the United States and it is true in most countries around the world.

Those are the facts we face as we prepare for another work day. The hole is getting deeper and our shovel is broken.

Faced with that reality, an increasing number of people are turning to frugality as the only logical answer. They are buying according to needs rather than wants. They are eliminating credit and paying in cash or bartering. They are embracing used and rejecting new.

Yes, I have preached this in many articles, but do I live it? Perhaps some of you think I am just a writer doing his thing, stretching the truth but not practicing it.

Well allow me to give you a tour of our home. Let me be your eyes as we see what a truly frugal home looks like.

Are you ready? Follow me, then, and let’s get started.

Home sweet Home
Home sweet Home | Source

Go Ahead and Park in the Driveway

There’s room right next to my 1997 Ford Ranger and Bev’s 2011 Honda Fit. No new cars for us. It’s just not practical. We can’t afford to pay cash for a new car, and we sure as hell aren’t going to go into debt for five years and make the credit companies richer than they already are….so the used cars will do nicely.

As you get out of the car, take a look at the house. It is a three-bedroom rambler with 1,100 square feet. Three of us live here full-time. We never know when one of our kids will come back home to live for awhile, so the garage was converted into a bedroom just in case.

Our home is sixty years old, and it is in need of repair. It needs a new roof for sure. It needs a paint job. It needs a variety of other repairs, but they will have to wait until funds are available. That’s just the way it is when living a frugal lifestyle. Even needs are placed on a priority list, waiting their turn until we can afford to do them. What we will not do is go into debt to pay for those repairs and upgrades.

Our home is built on love
Our home is built on love | Source

Come Inside and Don’t Mind the Dogs

There are three of them, and they will lick you to death if you don’t just tell them to scoot.

Welcome! The first thing I want you to notice is that there is nothing new in this house. Nothing! All furniture is secondhand. Some was purchased at garage sales. Some we found on the side of the road, and some was passed down in the family.

We do not believe in new.

Does the interior need repairs? Most definitely! We need new flooring in the kitchen and the bathroom. The walls could really use a coat of paint. It would be nice to put a finish on the wood floors, and we need insulation in the attic.

In time….priorities….available cash….that’s how we rock and roll in this house.

You will also notice how comfortable it is here when you visit us. There is no need to take your shoes off when you enter. In fact, if you want to put your feet on the furniture, feel free to do that as well. For us, a home is about comfort and love. We want you to feel at home in our home. What’s the worst thing that can happen? You permanently damage a piece of furniture that might have cost us ten dollars max? We’ll just go to a garage sale and get another one, so don’t worry about it.

Please note, also, that there is very little clutter. That’s because we got rid of the superfluous junk that we don’t need. We are down to essentials in this house and we love it that way. There is less to clean. There is less to pick up. There is less to store.

And less is beautiful!

Room to grow
Room to grow | Source

Come on out Back

This is where it’s really happening at our home. You’ll notice the garden filled with vegetables and herbs. You’ll also notice the six chickens that provide us with fresh eggs daily. With all that we still have room to grow, and that room will be used for beekeeping and goats in the next year.

Yes, there is a back lawn, and yes, I despise lawns. Not only do they need mowing, but they really serve no purpose in the environment….so this lawn is going to be gone soon. I want to increase the amount of herbs we grow here, and I also want to build a brick barbecue/oven at some point in the near future. Since we don’t need the lawn there is no reason to have it. Am I right or am I right? The same can be said for the small lawn we have in the front yard. Eventually we want a miniature edible forest in the front, complete with grapes and berries, herbs and fruit trees. You don’t have to mow a fruit tree, and I love that fact.

The chickens are happy here
The chickens are happy here | Source

Vital Statistics

Our property covers about 1/8th of an acre, and as I mentioned earlier, the house is about 1,100 square feet of living space. Let me repeat something so you fully comprehend: there is nothing new in our property. We do not buy new. We needed a washer the other day and bought a used one for $180. It works fine. We needed a dreaded lawnmower last month. We bought one used for $25. It works fine.

Why not buy new you ask? Because there is no reason to do so! New costs more, and our money is for necessities. New means more raw materials needed, and that is bad for the environment. Since neither Bev nor I have egos that require status symbols, there is no possible reason why new should ever enter our home.

Do you consider yourself frugal?

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How Do We Pay for It All?

Quite easily, thank you very much. Bev has a full-time job as a store merchandiser, and I am a full-time writer. Between the two of us, we make about $30,000 per year. We have a mortgage payment and a small amount of dental debt, and that is it.

We are ready for the next recession. No matter what the idiots in Washington D. C. do during their next legislative session, we are ready for it. No matter how many financial roadblocks are created by big business and the lending institutions, we are immune to it.

In other words, we made a conscious decision to firmly grasp our destinies so that we did not have to worry about the vagaries of the market or political landscape.

And now, how about you? How are things in your household? Are you like tens of millions of Americans, one paycheck removed from the poverty line? Are you silently praying that your job will exist next year? Are you hoping against hope that the economy will improve next year, and that you’ll get that much needed dollar per hour raise?

Keep hoping.

In the meantime, we will be living our frugal lifestyle, and we will be worry-free.

Life is good, don’t you think?

2014 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

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    • Janine Huldie profile image

      Janine Huldie 3 years ago from New York, New York

      I loved your tour here today and will tell you my girls would be so happy to visit just on the idea that you have dogs to lick them. Seriously, both my girls are dying for a dog and hoping to get them one someday soon. Thanks for sharing Bill and Happy Tuesday now!

    • Larry Kitzmann profile image

      Larry Kitzmann 3 years ago

      Thank you for the tour Bill I love that you shared your home along with your thoughts today. While Jeanne and I currently live in Ann Arbor we do have the farm in Iowa with two houses both over 100 years old but more than functional. Yes and my car is a 97 Chevy Lumina now some 17 years old and still running quite well. As you know I totally agree that a day of reckoning is coming and a whole lot of people are going to be hurt in the next crash. Take care my friend and keep walking the walk.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Janine, we'll be glad to ship you one of ours. LOL Seriously, kids and dogs...a natural partnership...but you know that I'm sure. I hope you can move and get a dog soon. Thank you and enjoy your Tuesday.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks for visiting, Larry. I'm glad you enjoyed the visit. Yessir, the crash is coming. I am sure of it. Although I don't want to see it happen, it does not frighten me. My family is protected. :)

    • cygnetbrown profile image

      Donna Brown 3 years ago from Alton, Missouri

      Hi Bill,

      I see that you have 1997 Ford Ranger! I have a 1997 Mazda also paid for. I wanted you to know that I am moving back to the country so that I can better do the things that I love to do. We had moved here to Springfield because of my husband's job and have been living in a rented townhouse, but my son offered me a trailer and six acres of land to live on and I decided that was exactly what I need right now! You are and always have been an inspiration for me, both as a writer and as an urban homesteader.

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 3 years ago from Central Florida

      Thanx for the tour, Bill. My lifestyle is pretty frugal. Most of the furniture and artwork in my home was purchased at thrift stores, yard sales or handed down from family. I had to buy a new bed a couple of years ago. I did buy new, but took advantage of a great sale. The mattress is new, also. I don't want to be sleeping on a used one; you don't know what's crawling inside there. Plus most mattresses are discarded because they're just worn out.

      I don't spend unless I have to. The budget simply doesn't have room for frivolous purchases. I bought my car new in 2007 and paid it off with my 401k when I quit my job. Hopefully it'll last me until I no longer need a car. At my current rate of travel, a full tank lasts me about two months.

      I have no problem wearing the same clothes a couple days in a row. I sit on my ass all day - how dirty can they get when I don't break a sweat? That also saves on laundry detergent and water usage.

      I'm working on becoming more self-sufficient. One day at a time.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Donna, bravo to you! Six acres sounds like heaven to me. I am so happy for you, and thank you for your kind words. I look forward to reading all about your adventures in the coming months.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sha, I love that a tank of gas lasts you two month. Bravo my friend. How many people can say that? If more could, we wouldn't need the damned middle east now would we?

      Keep on keeping on my friend. You don't need my suggestions at all.

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 3 years ago from SW England

      Thanks for inviting us into your home. It looks great and it feels welcoming.

      I struggle to be without grass though. We have a paved back garden and I do miss the soft green underfoot (especially bare-foot!). However, it does save the mowing and therefore the need for a lawn-mower, of course.

      We hardly ever buy new; I felt quite guilty buying my new motorbike but it was a treat, the first new vehicle I've ever had (& probably the last!).

      Even being able to afford some things doesn't mean we should buy willy-nilly. Frugality means careful purchases, it means helping the environment and it means much more fun!!

      Great philosophy, bill! Ann

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      All of those things are true, Ann. Just between you and me (shhh, don't tell anyone) I want a motor scooter something fierce. :) I will own one eventually as that is on my wish list. I'm trying to justify it, but I'll come up with some excuse that makes great sense. :)

      Thanks for your thoughts. I hope you are having a great week. When are you coming to visit?

      bill

    • Jeannieinabottle profile image

      Jeannie InABottle 3 years ago from Baltimore, MD

      It's funny how things have changed in this country. I hope more people live a frugal lifestyle. I am trying to do it, but I do love my new shoes or clothes every now and then. I am packing my apartment to move in with my fiancé, and I realize I have SO much I don't need. My apartment building is having a big yard sale in a couple of weeks and most of it is going. I now work less hours because I would rather have more hours and less things. When I see some new gadget I don't need, I just say, "I don't work Fridays anymore" and that makes it OK.

      Thanks for sharing your tips, Bill. My fiancé and I were going to get chickens... but he had different plans for them than I did. I wanted the eggs... he wanted fresh chicken meat. We are NOT getting chickens and sticking with a vegetable garden instead. I always think of you and your chickens when the topic comes up... I would like some egg laying pets, just like your chickens. ;-)

    • Availiasvision profile image

      Jennifer Arnett 3 years ago from California

      Bill,

      You have a very lovely home full of love. Thank you for opening it up for us and giving us a personal tour. I absolutely adore the creativity put into your chicken coup, especially the truck cover for the top.

      I don't own any new furniture either. To save money, I made some of it and bought the rest used. I'm young, a renter, and want to live lightly so I can move about as I wish, unhindered. There is no harm done if, when I go to move, the $3 chair I picked up at a used store gets donated to charity or kicked t the curb with a free sign.

      I just moved into my first apartment 2 years ago and had so much fun trying to furnish it with cheap used items. My roommate's boyfriend built us a TV stand, and I built my own desk. When friends and family heard of us getting an apartment, they started offering us stuff they didn't need. That's how we got free décor, a lamp, a couch, a coffee table, a kitchen table, and plate cabinet. Within three weeks, we went from eating dinner on the floor, to a fully furnished house. All for about $100. I now have the confidence, that if I was thrown into any city in the world, I could put together a home very quickly and cheaply.

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 3 years ago from SW England

      We have such a long list of places to visit now we're not 'tied' to France all the time. However, it's going to take some time to get through that list! It would be great to visit you though, so you never know, maybe on a detour from Canada! Ann

    • Mel Carriere profile image

      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      I envy your simple life. Here in outrageously expensive SoCal I am one of those one paycheck removed guys. When your book hits the best seller list will you be hob knobbing with the rich and famous or still living your simple life there on your own Walden Pond? Great hub!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Well, Jeannie, I think that was a good compromise. I could never kill our chickens, either. They are family pets now, dammit! LOL

      Best wishes on our upcoming marriage. May you find happiness for decades to come.

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, if you come to British Columbia, I'll meet you up there. It's only a four-hour drive up to BC, and you are worth it. :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jen, I love your example. I have no doubt you could do the same in any city. I know I could once I breached the language barrier. Well done...an entire apartment furnished for under one-hundred. You are officially a member of the Frugal Club of America. :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mel, I wouldn't know what to do with rich and famous...maybe Big and Rich, the country duo. LOL Let's hope...then I can go on a book signing tour in SoCal and meet you.

    • kidscrafts profile image

      kidscrafts 3 years ago from Ottawa, Canada

      Thank you for sharing a tour of your home and backyard! I like your approach! My husband and I are sharing a car; it can be tricky sometimes but that's OK. For us a car is not to show off; it's a practical object to bring us from point A to point B and back. When we lived in Europe for a while we had no car and we were either walking for groceries or using public transportation. I remember that we had some dirty looks one time when we took a piece of furniture in the bus in Brussels... I just ignore them :-)

      Have a great day!

    • Radcliff profile image

      Liz Davis 3 years ago from Hudson, FL

      Say what you will, I simply must lease a new Mercedes every two years.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Joelle, good to see you. I would love to live in Europe for awhile...maybe some day. I didn't have a car for two years prior to buying that truck, and for the most part I got along fine without one. Thanks for sharing your experience.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Lizzy, I'm trying to picture you in a Mercedes.....nope, not happening. :)

    • Barbara Kay profile image

      Barbara Kay Badder 3 years ago from USA

      Bill, Before you get goats, talk to someone who has raised them. There are a few problems with them. A couple of our friends had them. I know free goat milk would be nice though. I am surprised that your town will allow you to raise them.

    • Anna Haven profile image

      Anna Haven 3 years ago from Scotland

      The economy is still on quicksand and finding ways to survive that, in our own little lives is paramount. Great tips Bill and your home looks cosy and welcoming. Anna :)

    • phdast7 profile image

      Theresa Ast 3 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

      Love it, love it, love it. My one story brick house (paid off five years ago at the age of 55) is also 1100 square feet. Amazingly, now that I think about it, my husband and I raised three boys in this house! I make most of my purchases at Goodwill, but my house is too cluttered. Good will shopping allows you to have books, books, and more books even on a really tight budget. :)

      Keep spreading the word. :) Frugal living is good living. Blessings! Theresa

    • suzettenaples profile image

      Suzette Walker 3 years ago from Taos, NM

      I know you walk the talk, Bill and Bev. This is an inspiring article and I agree with what you write. I haven't brought a brand new car in more than twenty years. I always buy used or "pre-owned" as the dealer likes to call it. I love your backyard garden. Reminds me of my grandparents and theirs. We always had tomatoes, peppers and lettuce from the garden in the summer; no need to buy them at the grocery store. My grandmother canned and put up pickles for the winter and handed them out to all of us as our parents worked. I support your frugal lifestyle and I am becoming more frugal, but it is a slow process for me. LOL! I was too spoiled by the "good life." before retirement but now I have to change my ways. Wish me luck!

    • Amy Naylor profile image

      Amy Naylor 3 years ago from England

      Sounds an awful lot like my household! Except for the land and chickens, I wish we could afford somewhere with space for some grow-your-own action. For now, we stick to plants that can be potted and put in the small yard that we share with our next door neighbour! Luckily we get along very well with them, we share and we spend only when necessary. It's such a great lifestyle!

    • rajan jolly profile image

      Rajan Singh Jolly 3 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      That's a lovely tour of frugality you took us on Bill. We are working towards it though in between some members keep slipping. In time, I hope they will also come to understand the importance of being frugal.

      This is a visit I will remember!

    • Victoria Lynn profile image

      Victoria Lynn 3 years ago from Arkansas, USA

      Good point about the yard! I need to plant more stuff that takes over the lawn. I've always been pretty frugal but am getting even more so. It's a good thing I love old stuff, as I rarely buy anything new. And I'm not a shopper--unless it's at a garage sale or thrift store--or flea market. My goal is to pay off my mortgage by age 50 so that I can live super cheaply. Maybe then I'll get a smaller house with more land and start raising some chickens. For now, I keep trying to get my raised vegetable beds to produce. Just planted yesterday. The frugal lifestyle can be challenging as well as fun.

      Great hub!

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 3 years ago from SW England

      You're very kind. Rest assured that if we're in the vicinity I won't hesitate to call. Ann

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      So interesting of the way you live. I only buy what is on my list and have a two-bed-roomed flat so comfortable and easy to maintain. Since my better half and son built it I have complete privacy and is most affordable. I don't buy much for the home as for now we have all the basics. The standard of life is expensive in Croatia. You made valuable points here thank you for the tour.

    • WillStarr profile image

      WillStarr 3 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

      Why is it that our happiest times are spent 'roughing it' in a tent or a cabin without all the modern conveniences?

      We plan to put our big old house on the market and move to a small town or an acreage and live in a small house when we retire. We want chickens, a garden, and peace. That's enough.

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Isaac Weithers 3 years ago from The Caribbean

      Bill, thanks for the demonstration of frugal. When I was introduced to shopping at Goodwill; my happiness doubled. You also seem happy judging by the tone of your article(s). You're living the good life. Great sharing!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks, Barbara, but I've owned them before. They do have their problems, but I love them. And this is a very progressive city, one of the reasons I love it here.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you, Anna, and I agree about the economy. Build a high rise building on quicksand and disaster awaits. :)

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Good for you, .Theresa, and I love that you raised three children in 1100 square feet. No big deal, right? I'll keep spreading the word my friend. This is the wave of the future, or at least it should be.

      blessings always

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks for sharing that, Suzette. Switching lifestyles is hard for sure. I had mine switch accelerated by forced poverty. I had to learn on the fly, but learn I did. :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I love it, Amy. One day you'll have your own space, and then you will be ready to move to the next level. Thanks for sharing your experience with us.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Rajan, you are always welcome my friend. Thank you for visiting us.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Vicki, you had me laughing. Oh yes, it can be challenging for sure. As for lawns, I have never understood the joy of them. All I see is work. LOL Thanks my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, I hope one day it happens my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      DDE., it is interesting to hear that life is expensive in Croatia. I would not have guessed that. Thank you for sharing that.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Will, good to have you visit us. If you are ever near Olympia, give me a call and we'll have a barbecue in your honor.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Dora, I am living the good life, and thank you! Power to Goodwill shoppers! LOL

    • DeborahNeyens profile image

      Deborah Neyens 3 years ago from Iowa

      You and my husband share a similar philosophy on lawns. Ours gets smaller each year with each garden expansion and Bob won't be satisfied until all the grass is gone. But for some reason I cannot convince him that getting a goat is a good idea!

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      Elizabeth Parker 3 years ago from Las Vegas, NV

      Nicely done, Bill! There is nothing like being prepared for that rainy day...or rainy months! We live frugally for the most part. Like you, I refuse to buy a new car, and I am not materialistic at all. In fact, the less stuff to worry about, the better.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      LOL....goats are not for everyone, especially male goats. As for lawns, give me another year and ours will be completely gone. :) Thanks Deb.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Liz, you are an old soul in the body of a youngster. No wonder I like you so much. Thank you!

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      Dianna Mendez 3 years ago

      You are living my dream. We are working on getting out of debt, simplifying our lives, down sizing to a simple home. I hope to have a garden and a few chickens in the future. Keep preaching!!

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      sheilamyers 3 years ago

      The best tip in this article is to never buy new, but I'll add "unless you have to". There are things like well pumps and hot water heaters that it doesn't pay to buy new even if you can find them. Other than those types of things, the only new stuff I have are things people gave to me as gifts.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Dianna, I hope that dream comes true for you soon. Thank you my friend, and enjoy that summer vacation.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Good point, Sheila. Most definitely there are things that need to be purchased new. Thanks for pointing that out.

    • MarleneB profile image

      Marlene Bertrand 3 years ago from Northern California, USA

      Life is VERY good, Bill. Thank you for the wonderful tour. I have learned that frugal really is better and a less stressful way to live. We've unloaded tons of "stuff" and now when we need something, we look first where we can find it free or used. It use to be the more my husband and I spent on something, the better we felt about it. Now, it's just the opposite. When we find something "cheap" we can't wait to let the other know. The cheaper the better and free... well, we really get excited about that. Oh, nicks and cracks? Please... get some wood putty and patch that thing up.

    • carter06 profile image

      Mary 3 years ago from Cronulla NSW

      We are with you on this Bill..a few years ago we made the decision to change it up a bit and get out of as much debt as possible..still on that path but getting there ( or will one day ) and many of us are recycling, buying second hand etc etc and find that it seriously works, why buy new when second hand is perfectly fine and a lot less money??

      Oh and love that super idea of a totally edible front garden..awesome.

      Cheers

    • MizBejabbers profile image

      MizBejabbers 3 years ago

      Bill, I gotta admit those photos are deceiving. That back yard looks a lot larger than 1/8 acre, but you certainly are putting it to good use. Bravo for you and Bev. We have ½ acre and can’t use any of it, so our “garden” consists of containers in our front atrium, which don’t grow much. We would like to have some chickens, but there’s no place to put a chicken house on this hillside.

      I’ll be honest with you. I’m past retirement age, but I’m afraid to retire. We don’t live hand-to-mouth and we have money in the bank for my retirement, but I’m still fearful of what the future holds for this country. Are we secure or are we just in the eye of the hurricane? I don’t think any of us can take chances right now. Thanks for the tour of your home and the great photos.

    • Efficient Admin profile image

      Efficient Admin 3 years ago from Charlotte, NC

      Thanks for the tour and your home looks cute and comfortable from the photo. That's what I want - a small mortgage! Hopefully it will happen soon for me. I love the backyard and your ways of living off the grid, i.e. having the chickens and growing your own food makes one less dependent on the system if it goes down. This was a fun hub to read - thanks for sharing and voted up and across.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      LOL...Marlene, I love your attitude. Putty and duct tape my friend. They can fix most anything.

      Thanks for the smile.

    • bdegiulio profile image

      Bill De Giulio 3 years ago from Massachusetts

      Thanks for the tour Bill. I can't say that anything here surprised me. I think I've gotten to know you fairly well over the last two years and read plenty of your hubs to know what to expect. I really have to agree with you about the lawn. We have a yard with grass that our kids used when they lived here so at one time it served a purpose. Today it is nothing but work and it consumes resources to take care of it. We did plant a raised bed garden this year, which takes up a little space but there is plenty of room to grow and next year I will expand it.

      I really love your approach to living. I think we all need to take a good look at changes we can all make. Have a great week.

    • fpherj48 profile image

      Paula 3 years ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

      I Love....LOVE.....LOVE this! But, you had to know I would. Excellent tour and great IDEA for a Hub, thank you very much! I'm so jealous of the chickens! LOL seriously.

      I'm just going to have to share my frugal living, bill......you've forced me. Obviously, it runs in the family!....UP+++ tweeted & Pinned

    • grand old lady profile image

      Mona Sabalones Gonzalez 3 years ago from Philippines

      Living frugal is the best way to go. BTW, I envy your veggie garden:(. One person I appreciate so much is Tyra Banks, because my daughter is a superwise shopper because of Tyra. She'll have a few nice things but the bulk she buys and ukay ukay stores (second hand) for a song, and these are dresses that look like they cost so much. Thanks to Tyra, my daughter loves to shop smart, not cheap. And that's saying a lot for a young woman. I think you have a very nice home. Slow renovation is good because along the way you get to change your mind so many times over, and when you're ready with the money you know for sure what you want. Living frugal is true wealth.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Carter, it is always nice to hear from others who are doing this. Makes me feel we are on the right path for sure. Thank you.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      MizB, I agree with you. I don't even think of retirement. One, I love writing full-time, but two, I don't think many of us are safe.

      Thanks for your thoughts my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Efficient, thank you for stopping by, and I'm glad you enjoyed the tour. Smaller is better for us. It is working so no need to change what we are doing.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Bill, I love that you finally planted that raised bed. Now just expand it each year, and pretty soon you won't have a lawn to worry about. LOL Thank you my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Paula, it's about damn time, Sis! Get to writing and tell us all what you do to live frugally. I can hardly wait.

      Thank you, Sis. Love it when you stop by.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mona, I did not know that about Tyra Banks. Very interesting. Thanks for sharing that my friend.

    • Au fait profile image

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      Living in poverty, I have no choice but to be frugal. My car is a 1995 Saturn and I wouldn't have even that if my brother hadn't given it to me 9 years ago. Lots of people do spend a lot of money on things they could easily do without, but I don't think a lot of people really think about how they spend their money or how they might improve on their money management. Hopefully you will inspire people to make their money go further if they have some, and help people who don't have much make it stretch.

    • alexadry profile image

      Adrienne Janet Farricelli 3 years ago from USA

      I really loved reading your hub and enjoyed the tour of your home and yard. Hubby and I would rather live frugally and struggle a bit as self-employed than with more money and working for someone else. It's a choice we have made and won't regret. I own a small dog boarding/training business, write for several websites/clients and my hubby is in internet retail. It's tough at times with prices of food going up all the time, and never going down, so we try to manage by making meals from scratch, baking our bread, growing our garden and making extra principle payments on our home mortgage versus spending it on futile stuff.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Au fait, I've been at poverty, and I've had lots of money. Today I control my financial future by being as frugal as possible. I hope you are correct and this article helps others. Thanks for sharing your experience.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      alexadry, I love hearing stories like yours. Well done and I really mean that. You made a choice for a better way of life, and I applaud you for it.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      That is indeed frugal. My grandfather lived that way for challenge, as thrifty values were impressed upon him by the Great Depression. No one except my father (the youngest of eight children) knew that he had thousands of dollars in crisp dollar bills buried in their dirt floor cellar "for safe keeping." He hated banks and stowed his own money there. Frugality is a gift.

    • DrBill-WmL-Smith profile image

      William Leverne Smith 3 years ago from Hollister, MO

      My wife and I call it "retirement" without a big pension... Thanks, again! ;-)

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 3 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thanks for the tour, Bill. Your frugal life sounds great!

    • Perspycacious profile image

      Demas W Jasper 3 years ago from Today's America and The World Beyond

      Repairing a decent car based on competitive bids keeps insurance costs and taxes down on our 1988 VW Quantum Wagon. We purchased a 1/4 A. garden lot (purchased meaning paid for in full) now it escalates in value but not in taxes, as it is used solely for garden, fruits, nuts, and berries (as well as exercise). We haven't added the chickens yet, but have the wire and posts and needed basic carpentry skills and tools. We've raised rabbits, ducks, and geese for food and fertilizer, and we can self-provide, if needed. Meanwhile, our lives are lives with the joy of service to others and grown children who devoted themselves to getting self-supporting educations they managed for themselves. Nice tour Bill, and sound financial philosophy to boot.

    • mary615 profile image

      Mary Hyatt 3 years ago from Florida

      You and I have so much in common; we think alike!! I drive a 97 Honda Accord and just hope and pray it will outlast me! I had to downsize from a big 3/2 house and now live in a tiny apartment, and I just love it.

      I enjoyed the tour: thanks so much!

      I was raised to be frugal and I always will be.

      Voted UP and shared.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Flourish, I love that story of your grandfather. I understand completely. Thanks for sharing that.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Love it, Dr. Bill...perfect description. Thank you!

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      It is great, Alicia, and it's fueled by love. Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Perspycacious, I love what you are doing. Now, if we can get several million others to follow, we just might see a healthier economy. Well done and thank you.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mary, you are a living example of frugal, and I love hearing about it. Well done my friend and thank you.

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      Denise W Anderson 3 years ago from Bismarck, North Dakota

      We advocate paying cash and buying used. We do a lot of our own mechanical and remodeling, and pay as we go. It has saved us thousands of dollars over the course of our lives. Thanks for the great example of frugal living and being willing to share it with others!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Denise, I love your example of frugal living. Bravo to you my friend.

    • manatita44 profile image

      manatita44 3 years ago from london

      All worked out Bill. Cool. Simplicity is the order of the day. Still, $30, 000 is really not much today. Great it's in your hands. You seem to know what to do. (smile).

      A great advert for frugal living. Peace.,

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you, Manatita. No, $30,000 isn't much, unless one has whittled expenses down to practically nothing, and then it seems like a king's ransom. :)

      blessings my friend

    • Dancing Water profile image

      Dancing Water 3 years ago

      Hi, Bill! I see that you are thriving and sending out wonderful messages as always. As much as I am saddened by the behavior of the greedy, I believe that being frugal is the way to live. Full stop. When we get caught up in the "stuff," we lose our souls in the process. Your home sounds so welcoming, as all homes should be. We need very little materially__and so much spiritually. These hard economic times could be a blessing__if we choose them to be.

      Blessings and warm thoughts,

      Dancing Water

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Dancing Water, so good to hear from you. I hope you are well my friend, and thank you for the kind words. "we lose our souls in the process"....very true words. I hope I never again lose my soul. :)

    • Jackie Lynnley profile image

      Jackie Lynnley 3 years ago from The Beautiful South

      I am with you 100% on this Bill; years ago I owed more than I could pay and I said it is just not worth it. The only bad I see if it is recession or God forbid; depression (as some are now saying) is the ones who have not taken care of things...that is just the only thing that makes it all worse and you have to ask do you need protection to keep what you have been smart enough to wisely accumulate? I hope you can reach many to warn them it is time to get wise!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jackie, I think slowly but surely, more people are seeing the wisdom in this lifestyle. I do think things will get worse, and I hope I can reach as many as possible before it happens. Thank you as always my friend.

    • vkwok profile image

      Victor W. Kwok 3 years ago from Hawaii

      Thanks for giving us a tour of your home, Bill. You set an example for us all!

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Wonderful tour and thank you for inviting us into your home and frugal lifestyle. You are putting into practice what God tells us about not going into debt, as we become enslaved to the lender, and who wants to be a slave! Then, we should not be afraid of letting go of all that stuff as it is just stuff cluttering our world. And believe it or not, clutter causes stress. When we place our trust in Him, He will always provide what we need, maybe not want we want, but what we need ... food, shelter and clothing. I am big on reusing old things, plus they seem to add much character to any home. A home without character does not feel like a home does it?

      I love the idea of the edible forest. I love fruit trees and peach orchards are big in our county.

      Blessings always

    • Sparklea profile image

      Sparklea 3 years ago from Upstate New York

      Billy Buc Voted up and awesome, this is one of the greatest inspirational hubs you have written. I have written at the top of my daily clutter journal, I DO NOT NEED ONE THING IN THIS HOUSE! My greatest problem is my writing materials. God is so good, they just opened a Salvation Army store within one minute's drive from my house and they take donations! Your tour has inspired and motivated me to continue my clutter journey...which I will write about when finished. With six living hear me, my husband and four cats, just keeping up with the daily necessities is challenging...I am throwing away and giving away A lot.

      Thanks for the shot in the arm. I just bought a Dyson hand vacuum with a little of our income tax return money and it is terrific for animal hair and crumbs. Clean, sparkly, shiny and empty...these are my goals. Our cellar is a war zone and I am determined to empty that also.

      Thank you for this wonderful hub showing your readers what they DO NOT NEED. You and Bev are living the great life of frugality and thank you for sharing these wonderful tips. PS: I said I pray daily for your dog...I guess it is plural. DO let me know when the goats arrive so that I can add them to my list! God bless you always, Sparklea :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Aww, thanks vkwok. I'm just trying to live what I speak about and hopefully others will learn from it.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you again, Faith, and blessings to you and yours. Indeed, clutter causes stress, as does keeping up with the Jones family. Neither are for me, and it sounds like you understand that as well. Well done!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Lea, you are so nice. Thank you dear lady. I love the simple life. I understand it isn't for everyone, but for those on a fixed income who are struggling, I think frugality must be a priority.

      Thank you for your kindness. You are a dear, sweet human being.

      bill

    • travmaj profile image

      travmaj 3 years ago from australia

      My frugality is built in - I grew up in a village in England, no bathroom, no car and hand me down clothes. The perimeter of my life was the edge of the village. I didn’t need anything more. Now I travel – from five star hotels to back packing on isolated islands. Home is a haven for growing vegies, two cows , dog and visiting birds. Even when you move on those early frugal ways linger - if I'm honest, I miss them.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you travmaj....love the fact that you have never forgotten your roots. Happy traveling my friend.

    • CrisSp profile image

      CrisSp 2 years ago from Sky Is The Limit Adventure

      This is a wonderful, wonderful write Bill. I'd call this a wake up call specially for those who are blinded by commercialism. I've since let go of some (yes, some) non-essential things in life and we try to keep only with the basics. Although, I must admit we're not completely there yet. However, when we downsized and moved into the new house, my hubby and I decided to keep it to the minimum. For example, we used to have a formal living room in the previous house with really high-end furniture (modesty aside). And let me tell you, it was actually a useless part of the house because let's admit it, how often do we have formal guests anyway? So, in reality it was just as good as a showroom.

      Now, in the new house, there's no more formal intimidating sitting room. Instead, we have an imperfect living room but very welcoming, comfy, light heartened and maybe quirky a bit but that's fine. Anyone who come and visit us in the house is considered family anyway except for the unsolicited door-to-door sales people. Lol!

      Plenty of lessons in this hub. Voting up and sharing. Thank you for allowing us to have a glimpse of your home-sweet-home with Bev, the dogs and the chickens.

      Here's sending you some love from the sky. ~

    • Ann1Az2 profile image

      Ann1Az2 2 years ago from Orange, Texas

      I think Bev and I would get along great - I can see us visiting flea markets and garage sells, going ga ga over someone else's junk that is now our treasure. I loved your tour and I agree with your reasoning. I love what you said about our shovel being broken. Boy, is it ever! Love your back yard and of course, the dogs and the chickens.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Cris, thank you! We once had a formal living room as well, and nobody used it. How silly, right? But we live and learn, and hopefully we learn for the better.

      Have a wonderful week my friend.

      love from Oly

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Ann! Truthfully, Bev had never gone to a garage sale, until she met me. :) Now she loves them. Who wouldn't? :)

      Have a wonderful week my friend.

      bill

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 2 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Everything could be better or worse, but your way of living sounds mighty nice.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      and mighty nice it is, Deb! Thank you!

    • LDThornton profile image

      LDThornton 2 years ago from Australia

      ahh billybuc, I am a fan of frugal living, and am a member of cheapskates.com in Australia. I live in a two bedroom unit with two cats and a husband. We've paid our property off and have done so on one income for most of the time. Yet another great hub. Well done. (I'm currently working on another..it should be up in a few days)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      LD, it is always a thrill to meet another member of the Frugal Club. Well done, and I look forward to your next hub. Thank you.

    • D.A.L. profile image

      Dave 2 years ago from Lancashire north west England

      What a refreshing article you have produced,in a no nonsense manner ,that made me smile. What a materialistic world this is with the attitude being,- look what I have got. You have admirably blown this away. But alas their will still be many people who want what somebody else has, no matter how much in debt they get into to procure it. Well done Voted up,interesting and very useful.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      DAL, thank you. I had to learn the hard way, but learn I did. Yes, there will always be those who feel possessions are necessary, but I believe more and more are coming to realize the silliness of it all.

    • LDThornton profile image

      LDThornton 2 years ago from Australia

      Im finding in Australia, previously people who loyally shopped in goodwill (or opp shops as we call them) are now shopping in Kmart because it has become less expensive. What they don't realise is that the goods are made off the backs of poverty stricken Bangladeshis, who work in appaling conditions just to survive. I still love thrift shopping and second hand goods. There is much more joy in finding a treasure with character, than something cheap and new for which the worker suffered in the production process. Here's to thrifting and all things used! Hip hip hooray!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      LD, your point is well taken. Here the big outlet is Walmart, and you would be hard-pressed to find a product there that wasn't made by slave labor. Give me secondhand any old day. Good for the environment and it does not encourage further questionable trade practices. Thanks for your thoughts once again.

    • SEGarvin profile image

      Elaine Garvin 2 years ago from Cleveland, OH

      A small home and lawn make for reduced energy and operating costs! No need for a riding lawnmower or snowblower.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      No need at all, SEGarvin. Thanks for your thoughts.

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