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Frugal Living Tips For Car Owners

Updated on January 12, 2014

A Reality Check

In a perfect world none of us would need a car, but we are so far removed from that perfect scenario as to render it not worth discussing. Our society is dependent on the automobile. Period! Since the 1950’s when society shifted from the downtown center to the suburbs, we have been a society on the go, and go, and go some more and go further, and that is just the reality of the situation. Sure, there are those like yours truly, who do not use a car during the week, but we are few and far between.

Another truth is that owning a vehicle is expensive. Quite obviously, the cost of fuel is high and most likely will get higher, but apart from that, maintaining a vehicle also cuts into the budget. Who among you has the spare cash to pay a mechanic $70-$100 per hour to work on your car? I don’t know how many times in the past I have budgeted carefully for a month, mapped out the expenditure of every nickel, only to have my car break down and shoot my budget out of the water.

So for all of you who feel that you car, van, or truck is an albatross around your neck, and yet do not know how to save money in this increasingly frustrating experience, this article is for you. Below you will find tips on how to cut expenses and just maybe….just maybe….make car-ownership a little more palatable.

I owned this 2002 Ford Ranger for eight years
I owned this 2002 Ford Ranger for eight years | Source

Never Buy New

Oh, I know, this flies against the thinking of most, but seriously, why do you want to buy a new car that will depreciate by 15% as soon as you drive it off the lot? Why do you want to sign a five-year contract so that you can make interest payments on top of the price of the car?

Do you remember the day when cars were made to last? I certainly do and it was not that long ago. In fact, there are still car manufacturers that make vehicles that are good for 200,000 miles provided you give them regular maintenance. Toyota and Nissan are two such companies and you can buy a used car made by them with confidence. It simply makes no frugal sense to buy a new car, and you can take that to the bank.

Simple car maintenance can save thousands of dollars
Simple car maintenance can save thousands of dollars | Source

Do Regular Maintenance Yourself

A recent study showed that 46% of American drivers do not know how to change a tire. To this writer, there is no greater frugal sacrilege than to pay someone to change your tire for you. Anyone interested in saving money will learn how to do basic maintenance on a vehicle. What is basic maintenance? Oil changes certainly fall under that category. Changing the oil and oil filter takes about an hour and requires no mechanical ability whatsoever.

My wife, the love of my life, changes brake pads on her car. What she is lacking in know-how she more than makes up for with determination and willingness. When she changes the brake pads she saves us a minimum of $200. Do you need a new radiator or battery? Change them yourself! How about a car door or trunk lid, windshield or bumper? Change them yourself! There are tutorials on the internet for practically any car maintenance you may need, and those tutorials do not cost you $70 per hour like a mechanic will cost you.

Can you change a tire and your oil?

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If You Need Maintenance, Shop Around

Never go to a dealership for maintenance. Quite frankly you would be better off flushing your money down the toilet. Shop around for an independent shop that will do the job for less. You might also check out local high schools and junior colleges; oftentimes they will take on the job as a teaching lesson.

You might also look into taking extension courses at community centers; the more you can learn about car maintenance, the happier your pocketbook will be with you.

Cut down on Gas

If you want better fuel efficiency, a general rule to follow is to buy a car with a standard transmission rather than an automatic. There are newer transmissions that have been developed that will give you even better fuel efficiency. Dual-clutch transmissions and CVT’s (continually variable transmissions) are all designed to increase your gas mileage.

Setting up a schedule for regular maintenance will improve your gas mileage. Keep those filters clean and keep the tires at their proper inflation levels.

Of course, you could actually walk the six blocks to the convenience store rather than drive, and you don’t need to warm up the car for ten minutes before driving it. Thirty seconds is adequate for most engines designed today.

Cut down on the use of the heater and air-conditioner.

Learn proper driving techniques; pulling away from a stop sign with the pedal to the metal is a waste of gas, and if you have cruise control then use it when driving on the highways.

Become an expert on DIY projects
Become an expert on DIY projects | Source

Eliminate Drag

There is a reason why cars have spoilers; the use of spoilers makes a car more aerodynamic and that means less fuel consumption. Thinking in those same terms, if you have a roof rack and you don’t need it, take it off. All you are doing by keeping it up there is providing more surface for air drag, and that means less gas mileage.

A trick I learned a long time ago from my father, and now I pass it along to you free of charge….when on the freeway, drive behind semi-trucks. Let their mammoth size block the wind while you slip in behind them and have a smooth, wind-free ride. Again, this means better gas mileage.

Use That Clutch

If you own a car with a manual transmission, learn that the clutch is important not just for shifting gears. Proper use of the clutch can improve your gas mileage AND save wear and tear on your brakes.

Where space allows, use your clutch to slow up in traffic rather than using your brake. Believe me, you will increase your fuel efficiency, and it will be a whole lot more fun driving.

Recent studies have shown that 74% of Americans prefer automatic transmissions. Why? Convenience and ease of driving, although I suspect many like the automatic because it frees a hand for cell phone use. We need to reverse that trend, and anyone serious about saving money while driving will seriously consider getting a car with a manual transmission.

Go for a Smooth Drive!

Cut down on the jerky driving, and practice the Zen of Smooth Driving. Better gas mileage is achieved and less wear on your car is realized when you learn to drive slower and steadier. Everyone is in a hurry to get nowhere these days. There is no such thing as a quick trip across town, so quit trying to achieve it. When you consider the number of stoplights and stop signs you are going to be facing, and the amount of traffic you will be battling, you will come to realize that it makes no sense to be in a hurry. The system is working against you the minute you pull out of your driveway, so why not work with the system?

Living in a Dream World

Yes, this writer would be perfectly happy is there were no cars allowed within city limits, but that dream went bye-bye about the same time I realized that Santa Claus didn’t exist. This writer would be perfectly happy if SUV’s were outlawed in this country and if Hummers were declared a public nuisance, but again, think Santa Claus.

Since I am not going to get my way on any of those issues, my next step is to try to help people save money while they own a vehicle. Most of what you have read is common sense, and it is all available to any driver willing to consider a little bit of change in thinking.

If you are interested in savings thousands of dollars yearly, then start practicing these frugal tips. If not, well, then I hope you and your Hummer will be very happy together!

2012 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

How to change a tire

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    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sha, no doubt! Hoo rah indeed! :)

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 4 years ago from Central Florida

      Testing ourselves is part of discovering who we are and that of which we are capable. Hoo rah!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sha, I love you! It is common sense, but most people cannot conceive of doing what you did. When I was younger I did quite a bit by trial and error. Now I've gotten a little bit wiser and can usually do it the first time without screwing it up. :)

      Thank you my dear friend!

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 4 years ago from Central Florida

      Great tips, Bill. I've changed my oil and even changed out a carbureator by laying the parts out in the driveway in the order in which I removed them. Take the new parts and gaskets, grease them and reverse the process. Common sense!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jamie, I think there were a lot of parents from the day who insisted their kids drive a manual and change a tire. I know my dad did, and I'm thankful for it. I swear, the Datsuns and Toyotas from the 70's and 80's are still on the road, some with like 500,000 miles on them. Now that is what I call reliable. :)

      Thank you my dear friend; I hope this finds you well.

      bill

    • Jamie Brock profile image

      Jamie Brock 4 years ago from Texas

      Thank you for all of these useful tips to save money for car owners. It's funny... my dad made me learn how to drive a stick and change a tire before he would let me out on the road by myself. It was irritating at the time but now I appreciate him for it. Also, my dad used to have one of those old small Datsun (sp?) pick ups and he drove it for YEARS and swore it was the best vehicle he ever owned.. after that he bought a Toyota.. or it might have been a Nissan and I think he told me it was basically the same company.. Anyway, he drove that for YEARS!!! So since then I've always known that Nissan and Toyota were the way to go when it comes to used cars. Great hub!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      LaThing, where have you been? I have missed you, and I haven't seen any notifications of hubs by you lately. Hope you are well! Well my dear, I think you need to go learn to drive a manual. :) You get bonus points for being able to change a tire.

      Thank you my friend and I really have missed you. Have a great weekend!

    • LaThing profile image

      LaThing 4 years ago from From a World Within, USA

      Very helpful, and lot of good pointers. And excellent, and useful hub, Billy! My husband is the one who takes care of the cars and he was agreeing with everything you said. The only problem is that I can't drive a standard! BUT I can change a tire :) Hehe, but he doesn't trust me with it! MEN!

      Voting up and very useful..... Take care, Billy!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Aurelio, I'd say you got your money's worth out of that Civic! LOL Good for you and thank you my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Dianna, good for you with that tire changing and oil changing talent. :) As for the roof rack, most people are not aware of it, or we would see a lot of those racks in driveways. :)

      Thank you and I love that you buy used.

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 4 years ago

      Bill, I wouldn't know what a new car feels like, we always buy gentle used. I am happy to say that I do know how to change a flat and the oil, but glad that my hubby does it for me. I didn't know that taking off the rack would reduce drag, great idea. Voted up and across for the excellence provided.

    • alocsin profile image

      alocsin 4 years ago from Orange County, CA

      Quite a handy list of things to do, given that I own my cars forever and run them to the ground. I have a 99 Civic that I bought new, and it's still going strong. Voting this Up and Useful.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Seafarer, thank you so much! Glad you found it useful!

    • Seafarer Mama profile image

      Karen Szklany Gault 4 years ago from New England

      Great useful tips and video, Billybuc! Thanks!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Great comments Rich; thanks for adding to the discussion. The man is not only funny but oh so wise.

      Wishing you a great day in Kentucky; it's' a great day without campaign phone calls bugging us every five minutes.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Randi, it is too bad your kids didn't take auto class....they will have to learn by trial and error like I did. :) The internet makes it so easy nowadays to learn things like that.

      Thank you Randi; it's always a pleasure having you stop by.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Martin.....LOL....you say a great deal in few words. Thank you Sir!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Faith, if you have 200,000 miles on that car it is definitely a keeper! Stay safe on that highway my friend. And yes, that is what hubbie is there for....and I'm sure he is more than happy to do that for you. :)

      blessings and peace my dear,

      bill

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      Rich 4 years ago from Kentucky

      Bill, I'm going to agree on most of what you say, but I'm going to debate you on part of it. When purchasing a used Toyota, Honda, Subaru or such, the resale value is extremely high (Nissans are a little lower, usually). The reason for this is that they last longer if taken care of properly, thus maintaining a much higher resale value. Most people trade in their vehicles three to four years into a purchase plan, or lease for the same amount of time. This is where most of the pre-owned vehicles come from. Still, you'll find yourself only saving a few thousand dollars most of the time, by purchasing a pre-owned versus a new. It's actually a good move to purchase one of the above named vehicles new, and have the knowledge that they vehicle will last because of the maintenance you give it from square one, as well as to get the full vehicle warranty at no extra charge. Most that purchase pre-owned also purchase an extended warranty that shoots the price right back up to close to the new's price. Now, in domestics, I'll agree with you 100%. But, in those mentioned, dealers recognize the value and charge much more for them because the book value is so high. I bought my wife's Camry new in '96, and it's still running great today. One of the best investments I ever made. My Ridgeline is the same story, just not as old. One of the best ways to gauge the value of your vehicle is "can I get out of it what a replacement of the same year and model would cost me?" If you can, then keep it. If you can't, get rid of it. Just some thoughts, my friend.

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      Randi Benlulu 4 years ago from Mesa, AZ

      Great hub, great tips! When my kids were in high school, I suggested they they take auto class. They didn't listen. :( In retrospect, I should have insisted. We practice a lot of your suggestions and have been better at DIY maintanence! My car, purchased almost new in 2005, is still running well and I wouldn't (couldn't) trade it away. Thank you, once again, for some great suggestions!

    • Mhatter99 profile image

      Martin Kloess 4 years ago from San Francisco

      Thank you for this. Had some interesting experiences with cars which kept me from driving.

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      Hi Bill,

      Another great hub here. I learned to drive on a stick shift and did so up until recently. I just told my husband that I was just going to drive my car until it just does not go anymore and not buy a new one, as it already has over 200,000 miles on it, as I have that two hours of driving everyday during the week. Once I get on the Interstate and those big 18-wheelers start throwing off small rocks on my windshield, I have decided to not get it repaired unless there is a very large crack all across my windshield. Ha. If I did get it repaired every time, it would be an everyday thing at this point! Well, as far as changing oil and tires . . . I know I should, but that's what the hubbie is for . . . my wrists have always been weak, and I just cannot turn it to get the tire off. I know if I had no choice, I could certainly do it.

      Blessings. In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Deb, I like your attitude.....eating sweets can never be a bad thing. :) Thanks Deb!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      stillwaters, it is a point I learned from my dad decades ago; he was a huge believer in buying used. :) Thank you!

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      Deb Hirt 4 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      You did an excellent job on this piece. I don't have a car, mostly because if I spend my energy walking as much as I do, I will lose weight instead of gain it. Considering all the sweets that I eat, that is a good thing.

    • stillwaters707 profile image

      stillwaters707 4 years ago from Texas

      Do you know what? I'm still driving the car I purchased used in 2000. My first car, bought new, lasted 7 years. My second, bought new, lasted one year, due to a wreck. You have a valid point. I lived it, Bill!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jo, I have heard good things about that car; I hope you found them to be true. :) I look forward to your hub and thank you my friend.

    • tobusiness profile image

      Jo Alexis-Hagues 4 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

      Billy, snap... I'm halfway through my hub about purchasing our USED RAV4, sad to say I don't drive, but my husband is pretty handy with all the basics. Informative and extremely useful hub. Well done.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Tips, you are so right. It is truly beyond me why anyone would pay to have the oil changed, but then I fully admit to being a bit different. :) Thank you!

    • tipstoretireearly profile image

      tipstoretireearly 4 years ago from New York

      Car repair tutorials on the Internet make many car repairs possible for the average do-it-yourselfer. And for simple things like changing the oil, you can actually save time doing it yourself since there's no need to wait in line. Very good advice in this hub!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Suzzy, like the car, you are a classic! :)

    • suzzycue profile image

      Susan Britton 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      They sure do and I cut the window out of plexi-glass( hard plastic with my jig-saw) . It cost me five dollars for the plastic because the junkyard wanted forty-five dollars, half the price of the car, imagine that. Oh yes I have been frugal with cars Bill my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Suzzycue, you are officially my Patron Saint of Automobile Maintenance! Good for you! I love comments like this one, that show what we can all do if we are willing. Love the Toyota story; those people know how to make a car that lasts, don't they?

      Thank you Suzzy; I loved this comment.

    • suzzycue profile image

      Susan Britton 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Hi Bill great tips here. I gave up my car twelve years ago and never looked back. I use to do all the maintenance myself, rebuilt a carborater, changed out radiators, put on muffler systems and even put a window in the back door of one car. You are right about Toyota's , I bought one with no back door window once for a hundred dollars and drove it for eight years and even towed it behind my Motorhome. It never cost me another dime after I put the window in except for oil changes. When the cars got all that computer stuff on them that is when I threw in the towel for fixing my own cars. Now I am happy to ride my bike threw snow, sleet, rain and even on sunny days. I love it. Great Hub.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Glimmer; I respect anyone who drives a manual shift car. :) Diesels can be tricky for maintenance, that is for sure. I appreciate you taking the time to visit and comment....as always!

    • Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

      Glimmer Twin Fan 4 years ago

      Love my stick shift diesel car. It's clean diesel and I get unbelievable mileage! Unfortunately being diesel means my husband cannot change the oil, at least according to him. We get lots of coupons for maintenance and use them often. Love the tip on eliminating drag.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Linda, I had a Jeep once....no doubt about it...cool vehicle, horrible gas mileage. Been there, done that, ain't going back. :) I think the "buy used" thing is a carryover from my childhood; my dad refused to buy new. As for driving manual, my son learned that lesson. I would not teach him until he agreed to learn on manual and now he is grateful for it.

      You are sweet and I greatly appreciate you. Election Day and televisions all across the nation are tuned in....please let it be Obama! :)

    • lrc7815 profile image

      Linda Crist 4 years ago from Central Virginia

      Well, this is certainly full of good stuff. I'm happy to say that I can change the oil and the tires and...I learned to drive on a manual transmission. Dad told me that if I wanted to drive, it was the only way he would teach me and he wouldn't let me get my license until I could pull off from a dead stop on a 90 degree hill. It was the one of the best things he taught me because I can drive anything. I can't tell you though that I made a great choice when buying a vehicle. I am driving the first "new" vehicle I ever owned and now it's 10 years old and has on 35,000 miles on it because the gas mileage sucks so bad that I hesitate to drive it. Dumb me. Love the Jeep, hate the mileage. :-( But, back to the hub... I learned a lot of tricks and think anyone who reads it will too. You're like my personal encylopedia.

      Vote up and across!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Beckie, I have not trouble picturing you changing your tires or oil, and your dad, and my dad, would have gotten along fine. My dad never, ever bought a new car; he firmly believed that a car needed to be driven for 10,000 miles to get the kinks out of it. :)

      Thank you dear lady; blessings to you and your mom.

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Bac2basics, there are many people who live in a situation where a car is a necessity. I really do understand that. My wife would not be able to do her job as a sales rep if she didn't have a car. I, on the other hand, don't have access to a car all week, and as a writer I really don't need one. :) I love that you have a small car, unlike so many Americans who still feel bigger is better.

      Thank you for the visit my friend from Spain. :)

    • shiningirisheyes profile image

      Shining Irish Eyes 4 years ago from Upstate, New York

      Valuable insight and I am completely and fully impressed that Bev changes her own break pads! My Dad always told me to never by new. Besides, as your article states there are many benefits -one being that someone else has already worked out the problems and bugs. And I can change my own oil and tire as necessity is the mother of invention.

      Great hub my friend

      Blessings XO

    • bac2basics profile image

      Anne 4 years ago from Spain

      Hi Billy. You should bring your car to Spain, even shipping it over and getting it repaired will still see you in pocket LOL. I cannot live where I do without a car as I´m a 10 minute drive from the nearest village and it´s up and down all the way, however my car is ancient and not a gas guzzling monster, even if I didn´t live where I do I really don´t think I would wish not to own my own small car. Great tips on how to keep the costs down though Billy so voted up etc.

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mark, you hit the nail on the head; if I can do this stuff then anyone can. :) Thank you Sir!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Pearl, I'll give you that, there is nothing beautiful about grease and oil. LOL Those VW bugs were built to last for sure. It is amazing to me how many people do not know how to use the clutch to slow down. I was taught to downshift many, many years ago, a valuable lesson for sure.

      Say hi to your husband for me; he sounds like a good man. :)

      Thank you!

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Cris, you are a doll, and I say that with the utmost respect. Thank you, and I love that you are willing to get your hands dirty. So am I! :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Petenali, I can say this for anyone reading....if I can do routine maintenance then anyone can! :) I love it...a used car salesman....well I agree my friend, never buy new! Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Liz, you have no idea! LOL Bev is my salvation, and I mean that sincerely. I love that you had the same car for 18 years....how cool is that? Thank you my friend; I hope you are doing well in Florida today.

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Carol, in many instances, buying pre-owned cars makes a ton of good sense. That was quite a good buy you guys found; a 2004 with only 18,000 miles? Keep that baby; you got a good one there.

      Thank you my friend!

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      Mark G Weller 4 years ago from Lake Charles, LA.

      Good tips Bill, all common sense and could easily be adopted by anyone!

    • grandmapearl profile image

      Connie Smith 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State

      You and my husband would get along just fine Billy! He has always done the maintenance on our vehicles. If he doesn't know how, he either asks or I go to the library and find the proper procedure and photocopy it.

      The most economical vehicle I ever owned was a cute little VW bug that I just loved. I always used the clutch to slow down. Wish I had a good car like that again. Oh well. As you say, times have changed.

      I appreciate all your money-saving tips. Voted Up, and everything except beautiful. I'm sorry to say I don't find anything beautiful about crawling under my vehicle to change the oil! Pearl

    • CrisSp profile image

      CrisSp 4 years ago from Sky Is The Limit Adventure

      Great useful tips. I love reading stuff where I can save money and I don't mind if my hands get dirty. Passing this along, after all sharing is caring. As usual, you have my vote not Romney, not Obama--Billybuc has got my vote! Yay!

    • petenali profile image

      Pete 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      I think many people have a fear that they simply won't be able to do the work themselves or that they might cause more problems. with the basic stuff that is simply not true. There is of course the fact that you are driving a lethal weapon on wheels, so if you don't change your brakes correctly there is potential for disaster. That being said, there are so many helpful sights/articles/videos online that the basics can easily be tackled and money can easily be saved.

      Speaking as a seller of used vehicles...NEVER BUY NEW!! LoL!

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      Liz Davis 4 years ago from Hudson, FL

      Great tips, Bill. It's amazing how we get into the habit of bringing our cars in for service, but never think about doing those things ourselves. It's not performing surgery, after all. I've driven only stick shifts since I was 18 (I had the same car from 18 to 36!), and I agree--they're a real money-saver!

      That Bev is a wonder woman, isn't she?

    • carol7777 profile image

      carol stanley 4 years ago from Arizona

      I like the idea about buying pre owned cars. They lose value so fast. ANd if we take care of these little transportation boxes we will see less money spent on repairs. All of us have spent more than we wish on getting cars repaired.. Except the rich who change cars on a yearly basis. I love all these ideas and I have already mentioned my AWE at Bev changing the brake pads...We just bought a 2004 Cadillac one with all the bells and whistles we never would have. However, it had only 18000 miles in perfect condition. And my husband polishes the engine daily...just kidding. Great hub on saving dollars that we desperately need to do.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Janine, there you go; look at all the money you are saving right now by not driving. :)

      Americans are enamored with their cars; so different from many nations in the world. Sigh!

      Thank you my dear; I hope today is better than yesterday, and on and on

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Michele, since you and you husband are a team, then it counts as you doing it. :) We can save a great deal of money just doing the uncomplicated stuff.

      Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Susan, in truth you are light years ahead of us; we simply could not rebuilt an engine, or a transmission for that matter. Way to go, Susan!.....and thank you!

    • Just Ask Susan profile image

      Susan Zutautas 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Great tips. We always work on our own vehicles. We've even rebuilt an engine together in our driveway. It does help if you're mechanically inclined though.

    • Michele Travis profile image

      Michele Travis 4 years ago from U.S.A. Ohio

      Love this hub, but when it comes to the fact that it comes to changing the oil or putting tires on the car, nope I can do either of them. But, my hubby can. He can do a lot of things with the car. Not the complicated stuff.

      Another great hub!

      Voted up.

    • Janine Huldie profile image

      Janine Huldie 4 years ago from New York, New York

      Great tips as always Bill on how to save money on owning a car. Right now, I can't even speak, because I can't stand on gas lines around these parts for more than 2 hours, so guess what I am saving plenty of money, because I am just not driving my car now!! That said I know that isn't the norm, but you really do lay out some awesome advice here and for if and when the gas shortage lets up I do appreciate it! Thanks again and have of course voted up and shared all over!!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      PS, that is a very funny story! I'm grateful my dad taught me the basics, and then I am very happy I was wise enough to hook up with Bev and she taught me more. It certainly saves us money from time to time. :)

      Thank you my dear; have a great Election Day!

      bill

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      Patricia Scott 4 years ago from sunny Florida

      Great tips for us Billy. I am learning as I go along. A penny is a penny to me so I try to do as much as I can. I am not able to change the oil but have a son-in-law who loves me and does it for me.

      Funny story...so years ago I had a real klunker...and decided that if I was going to be able to drive it, I would take a mechanics class at a local community college. I signed up and was eager to learn. The day before the class began my car broke down completely, nervous breakdown or something, and I was unable to take the class. O my...anyway thanks for keeping us in the loop. And I have owned a number of used cars which lasted and lasted and lasted. Have a lovely day, my Friend, ps