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After Russiagate, Are Congress and the Media Even Relevant Anymore?

Updated on July 19, 2017

With the sideshow called Russiagate blustering along despite the firm denials of the recipients of the leaked emails that their sources had anything to do with Russians, the congressional committees holding hearings and the major media reporting them are pushing themselves into the oblivion of irrelevance.

Julian Assange of Wikileaks, who received the DNC and Podesta emails in the first place, is the one man on the planet who would know who gave them to him. This is a cold, hard fact, no matter what you think of Assange. He has said over and over, no Russian "state actors," which is not to say no Russians.

But that is only because any private citizen, Russian or otherwise, could have obtained any of the emails, because the owners either fell for the oldest scheme in the book to give away their password, or made their password something like...password. Russians, Swahilis, Palauans, anybody could have hacked the emails. Not sure how that makes the case any better.

Corroborating Assange is a former British Ambassador who has a reputation for impeccable integrity, Craig Murray, who says he actually met the person who handed off the DNC emails. Murray was put through hell by his government for pointing out that the people we were allying ourselves with in order to invade Iraq, namely Uzbekistan, were torturers with rape rooms who were every bit as bad as Saddam Hussein. Even Saddam didn't boil people to death.

Russiagate congressional committees' interest in talking to Murray: zero.

Not one reporter has ever asked a committee chairman, if the original recipient of the leaks, Wikileaks, says that Russian state actors were not behind them, then why are you going down this road? A bright 12-year-old would think to ask the question.

Yet built on the sand hill that "the Russians" hacked the emails, which in turn influenced the election, by exposing corruption, is the circus over whether or not Trump colluded to expose the corruption.

What was the corruption? Nevermind, that's fake news. Even though the emails stolen were very, very real.

As the kids say, LOL the polls that say trust is high in the media, published by...the media. I'm thinking of something to do with a circle here. Pravda says...people trust Pravda. Alrighty then.

The Pravdas of the world are read and watched with smiles and laughs in coffee shops each day by audiences which view them as pure entertainment. Anyone who takes it seriously is seen as soft as a banana. The village idiot, who doesn't know the people asking him for the latest are laughing at him.


The change has been slow and long in coming. Americans have always had a love-hate relationship with the media, with the left accusing it of being too conservative and the right accusing it of being too liberal. But never has the disassociation from plain reality of our major institutions been so complete.

It matters not whether you are for Trump, against him, or none of the above. Trump may easily and justifiably be attacked for violations of the rights of Muslim-Americans, by lumping them in with international terrorists, for escalating the war in Syria, or a number of other truly important affronts to peace and justice.

The airwaves now clogged with ghosts of Russians could be carrying debates between the best minds on man-made global warming, pro and con, with Internet fact-check sites running alongside to cast light on what may be the most important problem to face the species since we evolved into what we are now. We could be hearing all sides, in the crucible of prime-time debate.

Unfortunately, the damage is not confined to the reputations of the congressmen who are flogging what cannot even be fairly described as a dead horse, but one which was never alive in the first place. It is clear that, in the minds of these officials, what the voters think matters far less than what their corporate masters think, the ones who own, or have access to, the vote-counting software in every state. If Trump is out and this is how we're going to do it, let's shut up and do as we are told. If you want the people with the Diebold machines to like you.

No, the real damage is to the institutions themselves, to the oak-paneled hearing rooms where grave deliberations involving war and peace have taken place over the centuries. The damage is that the world now sees these same rooms taken over by a clown show.

Republicans are as much at fault as Democrats, by even lending their presence to the hearings. To even remain seated in a room with such jack-in-the-box and whoopee cushion hijinks degrades anyone who does not get up and leave.

A hula-hoop just rolled out of the Dirksen Senate Office Building. Brave men ran off boats and into machine-gun fire on beaches...for this?

One start in the right direction would be a true voting system where incumbents can be properly punished at the polls, rather than externally hacked back into office as seems to be happening lately. In Arizona John McCain suddenly came from behind in the state's largest precincts, and in Florida, Debbie Wasserman-Schultz roared back in a vote that will never be checked for accuracy. Whether they are Democrat or Republican doesn't matter much. They are the Incumbent Party.

The faceless powers behind the Deep State must be deprived of their ace-in-the-hole: hackable electronic vote-counting.

Some political philosophies say we don't even need a government, and there was never a better time for them to put their case forward. We are paying these guys 200 grand a year, for this? The anarchists of the world suddenly start to make sense.

Even Trump might know enough to know he is benefiting, by the vacuum of trust being created. He might understand the old Chinese art of war saying: Never interrupt your enemy when he is making a mistake.

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