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Border-line-illusions-Part 4. Machu Picchu and the Sun Gate (Inti Punku)

Updated on January 15, 2016

The Famous Machu Picchu

A view of Machu Piccu from the Gateway to the Sun
A view of Machu Piccu from the Gateway to the Sun | Source

Machu Picchu

A markerMachu Picchu -
Machu Picchu, Peru
get directions

You should visit here.

The town below.
The town below. | Source

The breathtaking views from Machu Picchu.

Today we get up early to beat the rush of tourists. We all take a bus from the town at the bottom of the canyon, to the top of near mountain side. The hair raising speed the bus drivers went as we move through the rain and clouds, was enough to be grateful for making it all the way to the top alive and well. As one bus is going up the narrow switchbacks others are already heading back down at the same time. Missing us by inches, one after another.

Machu Picchu is surrounded on 3 sides by the Urubamba River.

Waiting for the clouds to lift.

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Our first view of the place is pretty awesome. We had just a few minutes of decent views, before we are swallowed by the clouds.A quick look around before the clouds catch us.These clouds are moving fast.If your not careful you could get lost, REALLY quick.
Our first view of the place is pretty awesome. We had just a few minutes of decent views, before we are swallowed by the clouds.
Our first view of the place is pretty awesome. We had just a few minutes of decent views, before we are swallowed by the clouds. | Source
A quick look around before the clouds catch us.
A quick look around before the clouds catch us. | Source
These clouds are moving fast.
These clouds are moving fast. | Source
If your not careful you could get lost, REALLY quick.
If your not careful you could get lost, REALLY quick. | Source

On top of the world.

As I wait for the clouds to lift, I find there isn't much to do but sit and wait. After a few minutes I can see some wildlife walking through the fog. Alpacas are expected at this point, but still awesome to see way up here. It must be the best way to keep the grass down as more things get uncovered throughout the year.

Alpaca

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The local lawn mowersAnother one shows up.
The local lawn mowers
The local lawn mowers | Source
Another one shows up.
Another one shows up. | Source

I can see!

Finally, after about a half hour or so, we can see again. The view gets more beautiful every minute that goes by. I will add a small video to show the look of the clouds rising through the cliff sides as soon as i can put it together (look for it at the bottom of this page in the next week or so.) It really doesn't get much better than this. You can take about any picture here, and it will turn out as picturesque as any pro photographer could make it.

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A trail to an old Inca bridge.

After a walk around the top of the ruins a bit we decide to see this Inca bridge around the corner. Some think this was a hidden secret back entrance to Machu Picchu. After signing a paper at a cross-way with a guard (apparently people have disappeared around these steep cliff sides). We follow a narrow path along the side of a cliff, that dead ends with a old weak looking wooden gate, keeping you from the "bridge" that just was 20 or 30 feet beyond it.
Tons of stones piled up on the side of the cliff. It was amazing to think of the work involved. See the stone stairs in the face of the bridge?

An Old Inca Bridge.

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Inti Punku - The Sun Gate

After hiking back to the main ruins area I hear about the "Sun Gate" or (Inti Punku- the sun door) . The park-guide told me it was only about 20 minutes up the hill, however after about 10 minutes I realized he was probably just talking about this old guard post area. It actually ended up being about 45-minutes to jog up the side of this mountain to the gateway. Would have been more like and hour and a half if I walked.

While I was here, I met a Dr. Favian from Chile. He was working on ways to help kids-at-risk have a place to play and learn. I think we will cross paths again one day in the not too distant future, it was a great visit. But the time was ticking and I knew that the rest of the group was probably wondering where I was by now. So we traded photo shots and I took a quick jog to the bottom. With stairs cut out of stone to jump to, and more people going up to dodge, I had a blast.

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Machu Picchu from The Gateway to the Sun. You can see the Hiram Bingham Highway that leads up the cliff side to the ruins.The Gateway to the Sun.Playin' around...hahaThis just looked like a great, place to set up camp.
Machu Picchu from The Gateway to the Sun. You can see the Hiram Bingham Highway that leads up the cliff side to the ruins.
Machu Picchu from The Gateway to the Sun. You can see the Hiram Bingham Highway that leads up the cliff side to the ruins. | Source
The Gateway to the Sun.
The Gateway to the Sun. | Source
Playin' around...haha
Playin' around...haha | Source
This just looked like a great, place to set up camp.
This just looked like a great, place to set up camp. | Source

A last look around Machu Picchu.

After I met back up with the group, just inside the portal to the city, it was time to start the way back through some more ruins on the way to the bus. With so much to see, I'll just let you look at a quick few places.

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The main city area.Waiting for the fog to clear out.Intihuatana was a ritual stone and is believed to have been designed as an astronomic clock or calendar by the Incas.I sat here to catch my breath for awhile after the jog down from the Sun Gate. Only shade I could find. Right next to the main portal to the city.Steep stairway to another area. The "Sacred Rock". When the clouds are gone you see the way this rock and the mountain called Cerro Pumasillo behind it are a lot alike.The "Sacred Rock".A look through a portal to the living areas.
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The main city area.
The main city area. | Source
Waiting for the fog to clear out.
Waiting for the fog to clear out. | Source
Intihuatana was a ritual stone and is believed to have been designed as an astronomic clock or calendar by the Incas.
Intihuatana was a ritual stone and is believed to have been designed as an astronomic clock or calendar by the Incas. | Source
I sat here to catch my breath for awhile after the jog down from the Sun Gate. Only shade I could find. Right next to the main portal to the city.
I sat here to catch my breath for awhile after the jog down from the Sun Gate. Only shade I could find. Right next to the main portal to the city. | Source
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Steep stairway to another area.
Steep stairway to another area. | Source
The "Sacred Rock". When the clouds are gone you see the way this rock and the mountain called Cerro Pumasillo behind it are a lot alike.
The "Sacred Rock". When the clouds are gone you see the way this rock and the mountain called Cerro Pumasillo behind it are a lot alike. | Source
The "Sacred Rock".
The "Sacred Rock". | Source
A look through a portal to the living areas.
A look through a portal to the living areas. | Source

Quick question...

Want to see more shots from Machu Picchu? I have quite a few more. But I didn't want to over load you.

See results

To much to show...

I took TONS of photos up here. However I think this was a good amount. I'll add some video soon to the end of this page so keep an eye out.

After we get to town, we all decide to go our own ways for the night. I went out for some food and met up with a guide I had met up in ruins. We shared a few beers and went back and forth showing each other our knot skills. (He was training to repel into other ruins in the area) Needless to say I think it might be rather easy to get a very different type of tour, with this guy in the future.

Well I was exhausted, and ready for bed.
Back to my room at "Intiwasi Centro Espiritual".
Had a cup of tea and I was out.

A few more random shots I HAD to share...haha

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A last meal with this view, before we head out of town.More of the townThe Train Tracks....havin' fun.The square near the cathedral.Over the town during a stormInteresting water works on the walkover bridge.Whoa!Big little guy.Inside the Sun GateFrom the top of the Sun GateIn the Temple of the Condor.Mate de Coca. Urubamba RiverA story on a sculpture talking of the 3 different plains of existence. Represented by the Condor the Puma and Snake.Water works at the bottom of the sculpture.
A last meal with this view, before we head out of town.
A last meal with this view, before we head out of town. | Source
More of the town
More of the town | Source
The Train Tracks....havin' fun.
The Train Tracks....havin' fun. | Source
The square near the cathedral.
The square near the cathedral. | Source
Over the town during a storm
Over the town during a storm | Source
Interesting water works on the walkover bridge.
Interesting water works on the walkover bridge. | Source
Whoa!
Whoa! | Source
Big little guy.
Big little guy. | Source
Inside the Sun Gate
Inside the Sun Gate | Source
From the top of the Sun Gate
From the top of the Sun Gate | Source
In the Temple of the Condor.
In the Temple of the Condor. | Source
Mate de Coca.
Mate de Coca. | Source
Urubamba River
Urubamba River | Source
A story on a sculpture talking of the 3 different plains of existence. Represented by the Condor the Puma and Snake.
A story on a sculpture talking of the 3 different plains of existence. Represented by the Condor the Puma and Snake. | Source
Water works at the bottom of the sculpture.
Water works at the bottom of the sculpture. | Source

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