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Decriminalization Now 2: High on Rights

Updated on December 25, 2015

A Living

In the case of legalizing all drugs, few people understand the true meaning of such a decree. While some would say that the legalized manufacturing, distribution, sale and consumption of mind and body altering substances should grow the economy or build tax revenue, the real issue here is rights. To deprive someone of the ability to introduce one’s mind and body to alien substances flies in the face of reason. In a fully free society, the reverence for rights would permit people to produce and consume whatever they wished, as long as they do not violate the rights of anyone else. Incidents like what happened in The Bronx, New York would never have to be a problem. Over 50 single kilogram bricks of cocaine never reached their intended destination as law enforcement officials seized the haul. Events like this would be completely legitimate. Perhaps the inner city kid without a job would be able to earn a living legally. He could apply himself to the drug trade without the threat of the force of the law raining down on his head. From the ground up, the drug trade would be open to anyone and everyone willing to put in the work to change their bleak outlook on life to undying light. And just consider the drastic change in the music of the genre of hip hop. Would rappers still crow about sending “birds down south” (or shipping packs of drugs, especially cocaine) and declaring themselves “Mr. 17.5” (a reference to the amount paid for a “ki” of cocaine going for $17,500) or how much kush (high strain of marijuana) that they put into the air? No. Aside from this minor alteration of the culture, the number of murders that would have been committed in the name of given drug would plummet.



The Pitfalls of the Drug Trade

Is it worth it?
Is it worth it? | Source

The Legalization Possibility

Should drugs be legalized?

See results

Purely

With the recognition of property rights, the illicit drug trade wouldn’t be so illicit. Because the laws state currently that those who prepare and deliver the narcotics on the streets must be punished for their “immorality,” few fight for legalization. The moral battle is what separates the will of the people from considering the opposite of what is on the books today. People feel that drug lords push a product that disrupts family unity and an addict remains a menace to himself and anyone else in his way. Purely seen from a point of view of rights, in a fully free society, such activities as assault, battery, theft, and intoxication while driving would be minimal if non-existent. If it ever appears, these actions would be punishable to the fullest extent of the law. Crimes over bad drug deals would be a thing of the past. Is there really any danger of a gun battle being waged over cases of Jack Daniel’s or Budweiser? No. But in the 1920’s and 30’s, bootlegging gave way to Alphonse Gabriel “Al” Capone and Benjamin “Bugsy” Siegel and Charles “Lucky” Luciano. These gangsters perpetrated the murders, the thefts, robberies and of course (at that time) illegal sale and distribution of alcohol.

Should this "Drug War" finally end?
Should this "Drug War" finally end? | Source

Unmistakeable

In modern times, youths revere the kingpins like Joaquín Archivaldo Guzmán Loera better known to the world as “El Chapo” and of course an assortment of hip hop artists who may have just sold a few grams but would swear that they moved major weight. The link to the gangsters of the past is present in the worship of these miscreants. With the removal of the criminal element, they lose their grandeur as rebels. Currently, that allure becomes an unmistakeable driving force to advocate for getting away with murder. And that’s what the current drug trade truly is about. The homicides of innocent bystanders caught in a drug battle is what concerns most people. But it is evident that with the decriminalization of drugs, these acts of the initiation of brute force would be nearly nil. And the recovery business would be privatized completely and offer addicts the possibility to get high on life rather than on substances. Rehabilitation centers would pop up all over the land offering a radical alternative to the destructive lifestyle of a user. Of course there would be age limits like the laws regarding alcohol. Rights respecting individuals would recognize that the actions of a coke head high on the party powder or a heroin addict strung out after riding the horse of age on his or her own private property would pose no threat to anyone but themselves. And yes, they would be committing an immoral act but that is none of the business of anyone (including the agents of the government, police and law courts) until they violate the rights of others. As members of a society which stands for the right to life, liberty, property, and the pursuit of happiness, it is in the best interest of every American to see to it that all drugs go the legal route. It would not be to increase tax revenue for states. It would not even be to ensure that more people get high. The main goal of making drugs legal would be to show that an aspect of freedom would be upheld without delay.


Millions in Drug Money

The bust
The bust | Source

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    • Skyler Saunders profile imageAUTHOR

      Skyler Saunders 

      2 years ago from Newark, DE

      bradmasterOCcal,

      Again, you're welcome.

    • bradmasterOCcal profile image

      bradmasterOCcal 

      2 years ago from Orange County California

      Skyler Saunders

      I wouldn't agree, but thanks for the clarification.

    • Skyler Saunders profile imageAUTHOR

      Skyler Saunders 

      2 years ago from Newark, DE

      bradmasterOCcal,

      You're welcome, sir. Well, "the reasonable purpose" for decriminalizing currently illicit substances and drugs that have been denied by the FDA would not be for the "people or country" but the individual. It would be up to law enforcement officials and courts to prosecute those individuals who violate other's rights to the fullest extent of the law. Now, for those who choose to shoot heroin between their toes or smoke crystal meth in the privacy of their homes or businesses and wish to do no one harm save for themselves, they would be protected by those same officials based on rights.

      In the wake of any adverse effects brought about because of the free use of (all) drugs, private institutions would establish rehabilitation centers, clinics, and educational programs to inform individuals completely about the dangers of drug use and abuse. Beyond that, crack cocaine and ecstasy usage, for examples, should be viewed as unethical because they present a threat to the welfare of mind and body, particularly the mind.

    • bradmasterOCcal profile image

      bradmasterOCcal 

      2 years ago from Orange County California

      Skyler

      Thanks for the clarification.

      What about the safety issue both of using these drugs, and the bad effects they have on the user that may be inflicted on innocent bystanders.

      Even FDA approved drugs are dangerous, and drugs from other sources than drug companies have no reasonable safe use, or adverse and even deadly reactions.

      What reasonable purpose would legalizing ALL Drugs provide for the people and the country?

    • Skyler Saunders profile imageAUTHOR

      Skyler Saunders 

      2 years ago from Newark, DE

      bradmasterOCcal,

      Specifically, like I wrote in the original article, I assert that all drugs ought to be legalized on the grounds of individual rights. Government ought to play no role in whether citizens make new opioids, have cocaine for sale, or dab marijuana or swallow MDMA. Political leaders ought to their one job amd to do it well: protect individuals from force and fraud. And all drugs, including those prohibited by the Food and Drug Adminstration ought to be on the market.

      Miss Rand's groundbreaking efforts elucidate the fundamental principles of reason, egoism and capitalism. If you found little value in her words, the president and executive director of the intellectual organization dedicated to her life, works, and legacy, The Ayn Rand Institute, Dr. Yaron Brook spoke on the subject in the following video:

      Yaron Answers: Should Drugs be Legal?

      https://youtu.be/ljWitLZzT-o

      I appreicate your recognition of my Hub and encourage you to share this and others with your friends and followers. I respect your opinion and viewpoints. I look forward to your future correspondences. Take care.

      S.S.

    • bradmasterOCcal profile image

      bradmasterOCcal 

      2 years ago from Orange County California

      Skyler

      It may be enlightening if you would share specifics on what you disagree with me on drugs and individual rights.

      I read a summary of Mr. Rand's essay, and I really can't find any merit in them as applied to the reality of existing government's constriction of rights, and the controlling mandates of religion.

      His theory is untenable in the set stage of government and religion in the world today, or even ever. So, it would be helpful to contrast my opinion with your specific disagreement.

      Thanks

    • Skyler Saunders profile imageAUTHOR

      Skyler Saunders 

      2 years ago from Newark, DE

      BradmasterOCcal,

      Thanks for your response. While I disagree with you on the topic of drugs and individual rights, I might suggest that you read Ayn Rand's essay "The Nature of Government" from her collection, THE VIRTUE OF SELFISHNESS. In it, she propounds the proper role of the state vis á vis individualism.

      And if you would like to see more comments on my work, I ask you kindly to spread the message of my Hubs. I appreciate truly your sincere acknowledgment of my pieces. Thanks, again.

    • bradmasterOCcal profile image

      bradmasterOCcal 

      2 years ago from Orange County California

      I am disappointed that you didn't get any comments in three weeks.

      At the same time, someone is racking up millions of twitters on some useless event.

      Anyway, I don't believe in legalizing ALL drugs, but as long as Tobacco is legal, I don't see any reason to make Marijuana illegal. I don't and never have used either of them.

      The drug problem starts with the drug users, and the drug cartels have a loyal user community of tens of millions of people in the US alone. The War on Drugs is dead, and it never had a chance. It didn't work for Prohibition of Alcohol, and addicts are addicts no matter what is the substance.

      Every generation has more information on the problems associated with using drugs, and yet every generation continues to have substantial drug users, as well as tobacco users. And of course, even with the very tough sanctions of DUIs, it has not stopped the driving under the influence.

      Substance abuse hits all classes of people, and the difference in the substance is directly related to the affluence of the user.

      People are the problem here, and the government sets the mood for them to rationalize their abuse of the substances. If the country had more prosperity, then I would suspect that at least a number of the drug abusers would be less.

      my opinion

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