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In Search of Cultural Diversity

Updated on October 6, 2014

DEFINITION

“ethnic,gender,racial,and socioeconomic variety in a situation, institution, or group;the coexistence of different ethnic, gender, racial, and socioeconomic groups within one social unit”

“We talk diversity, and then get in our cars and drive like hell to get to the suburbs.”

Cultural diversity...the goal
Cultural diversity...the goal | Source

Observations During My Lifetime

There can be no doubt that I have seen a great change in cultural diversity during my lifetime. When I was a child there were still signs that declared “whites only” on public restrooms and restaurants. Today those are gone, and we see interracial dating and marriages, and that is all good and as it should be.

However, I do not believe for a second that cultural diversity is universally accepted. I believe, for many, it is simply a matter of social diversity being politically correct, and that the old ways of thinking have been relegated to the closet, out of sight of the mainstream. No one who has any desire to be accepted by the general populace would dare speak out against diversity. No, those thoughts and actions are saved for the living rooms when it is safe to speak to those who have similar beliefs.

I remember talking to my dad about cities he had seen when he was in the army. He spoke of different ethnic neighborhoods within the great cities. He spoke of Little Italy, Chinatown, and other sections of town where the Irish, Jewish, Russian and Mexican people lived. It was understood that you did not roam into a neighborhood that did not contain “your” people, and the neighborhoods were clearly defined by street names, almost invisible boundaries that separated one from another.

Is it any different today?

Look Again at the Second Quotation

“We talk diversity, and then we get in our cars and drive like hell to get to the suburbs.”

I saw that quote a few weeks ago and it has stuck in my craw ever since. Have things changed that much in the past sixty years? Why do people live in gated communities and out in the suburbs? We need an honest answer to that question. Is it for safety? If so, then safety from whom? Is it safety from “those people,” or is it safety from crime?

It is an interesting question is it not? It can only be answered by each individual during quiet times when honesty is allowed because no one else will hear the answer.

When I was teaching I would eventually have a teaching unit about cultural diversity, and I would always ask my students a rather simple question: would they be willing to marry a person of a different race? I would also ask them if they have any “best friends” who are of another race.

The answers were quite often as you would expect them to be, for who has the fortitude at that age to speak the unspeakable? Every once in a while, though, there would be a student who would actually say that there was no way they would marry across racial lines and they did not believe that was a good thing to do.

From the mouths of babes! What makes it interesting is that a middle school student does not form that opinion on their own; chances are excellent that they are parroting what they have heard at home from their parents.

It has to begin with acceptance

At the Workplace

Wage statistics would seem to argue that cultural diversity is not as established as we might think. According to the U.S. Census, the median weekly wage of African Americans in the United States is 65% of their white counterparts, while that of Hispanics is at 61%. The most common reason given for this is the lack of educational opportunities for Hispanics and Blacks. Interestingly, Asians are 1% higher than Whites when comparing median weekly wage.

Can these disparities in wage be looked at as examples of a lack of cultural diversity? According to the definition of cultural diversity, namely the coexistence of diverse groups, then no, wages really do not apply in the discussion. However, the concept of cultural diversity implies, does it not, that there is an equal playing field in all facets of life. If that implication is true then we have to say emphatically that cultural diversity is falling short of its lofty goals.

What Should Be Done?

I am going to stray a bit from my Liberal friends. I do not believe that cultural diversity can be legislated. It has been tried many times in the past, from the Emancipation Proclamation to the Civil Rights Act. Yes, each piece of legislation has achieved some good, but in my humble opinion it is a Band Aid covering cancer. The real problem of acceptance is being overlooked, and you cannot legislate acceptance.

True cultural diversity will only be seen when we as a society embrace it. When every man, woman and child chooses to concentrate on our similarities rather than our differences, then we will see cultural diversity and all of its benefits. When every man, woman and child sees a human being in front of them rather than a Black, Hispanic, Asian or White, then we will live the spirit of cultural diversity.

What should be done? Spread the word. Educate your children. Become a living example of cultural diversity. We have seen huge strides in this societal area, and we will continue to see further strides made as we come together for the common good.

Humanity One World
Humanity One World | Source

Shangrila, Bill? Really?

I have been called a cynical optimist. I prefer to think of myself as a realist. I do not believe for a nano-second that cultural diversity is accepted in the hearts and minds of the entire country. Do I believe it is possible to improve? Most definitely, but it will take a great many years.

Unfortunately, as the income gap increases, and the rich continue to distance themselves from the poor and the economy worsens, I believe fear will lead to blame and then we will truly see how strong this cultural diversity idea really is. Fear is the wild card that cannot be ignored, and fear is born of ignorance. If we do not make a concerted effort to educate ourselves about other cultures and races, then we will continue to fear, and then we are doomed to fail.

H.O.W. can there be true cultural diversity? It begins with each individual. No government can do what a determined group of citizens can do. No legislation can reach into the hearts of man and change decades of misconceptions. Only we can do that, and the sooner we realize that, the sooner we will see true cultural diversity in this country and around the world.

2013 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

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    • profile image

      JThomp42 4 years ago

      Great read Bill. The age old question comes to mind after reading this, "Why can't we all just get along?" I don't care what color our skin is, we are all human beings with the same feelings and emotions. Most importantly, we all bleed red. As Jesus commanded, we should "Love one another."

    • Janine Huldie profile image

      Janine Huldie 4 years ago from New York, New York

      Education is key on this and it is truly sad that this type of inequality and prejudices still do exist in our society. I too get quite saddened when I think of it, especially from a teacher and a now a mother's standpoint. Beautiful article Bill and just hope and pray that I will see some improvement on this in my lifetime.

    • Kathryn Stratford profile image

      Kathryn 4 years ago from Manchester, Connecticut

      What an honest look at diversity. I agree, it is an issue that has to be looked at individually.

      I have seen issues personally in my life. As a teenager, a relative in authority over me told me not to, under any circumstance, date a black man. I was so shocked by that statement, because my family never acted racist, and they were friends with those of other races. It confused me. I also used to be told not to go in certain neighborhoods. Many times they were dangerous areas, but other ones were not necessarily any worse than our own neighborhood, it was just racially diverse.

      One other time (in my early adulthood) that I was also shocked was the first time I went to a church in Virginia. After going to it for a couple of months, it hit me that every single member there was white, and all of them looked to be upper middle class. When I finally noticed it, I felt very creeped out, and never returned. They may not ban other races from attending, but I think if a large congregation in a diverse area of the country has an all-white congregation, it says a lot. And I didn't like what its silent message was.

      Okay, my rant is almost over. I believe that even though it is politically correct to embrace diversity, there are a lot of people who don't really give a damn about it when it really comes down to it. I think people really need to look at themselves, and do more than TALK about it for the sake of looking good.

      Thanks for such an eye-opening article, Bill.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jeff, it seems so simple to me, but maybe I am too simplistic. We are all the same....just human beings trying to live on this planet. Anyway, thank you Sir!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Janine, I believe you are correct. Education is the key, in the schools, at the workplace and in the home. Until we teach others that we are all the same we will continue to struggle in this area.

      Thank you and Happy Valentine's Day.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Kathryn, your examples are fantastic and I believe still very much applicable this very day. This is one of those subjects that no one will admit to, but you can bet that prejudice is very much alive in this society. I will never understand it, nor will I understand racial profiling or any other action that singles out one group from another.

      Thank you for being the person that you are. We need more of you in this world.

      Happy Valentine's Day my Boston friend.

    • profile image

      JThomp42 4 years ago

      I certainly agree Bill. It does seem so simple.

    • carol7777 profile image

      carol stanley 4 years ago from Arizona

      I still think it is a long way away. People act like they are accepting but in reality are not. The landscape has changed a great deal from the time we went to KnotsBerry Farm and a black couple was asked to leave. However in the hearts of man there is still a great deal prejudice.

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      Vickiw 4 years ago

      This brings up all kinds of deep feelings. One of the saddest is remembering how in 1971, my husband and I left South Africa, giving up everything we owned, to ensure our little daughter would not be raised in the apartheid system. We never regretted that step, in spite of the difficulties we went through after that. Since then I have lived comfortably with a rainbow of different cultures, and think that is probably the best way for all of us to learn appreciation of other cultures. Sounds difficult? You have to actively seek opportunities. Thanks Bill, this is a great read

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Carol, it bothers some people when I say that, but I believe there is still a great amount of prejudice in this country, and from some people you would never suspect it of. We just shove it in the closet and call it something else. :) Thank you as always and Happy Valentine's Day.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Vicki, what an amazing experience. Have you written about it? That's the type of hub that people will find fascinating, told from personal experience that will touch hearts. I hope to read that story some day.

      Happy Valentine's Day my friend!

    • Kathryn Stratford profile image

      Kathryn 4 years ago from Manchester, Connecticut

      If Vicki wrote a hub on that subject, I would go out of my way to read it.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Exactly, Kathryn. That is a hub that needs to be written. Happy Valentine's Day, Kathryn!

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 4 years ago from sunny Florida

      This issue is one that should be of concern to all of us. It is not just one race directed against one other race...it works both ways.

      It takes all of us...coming together and discovering who we are. It starts in our little towns. We have discussed this before, Bill. In the small town where I live there are undercurrents of racial unhappiness...but by doing our little part we can begin to make inroads. I speak to everyone and try to make everyone feel valued. However sometimes it is not received or acknowledged. For some that ends the effort....not for me....as you can well imagine

      I too saw those signs that said 'whites only'. But sadly those signs are still around..not posted, unspoken, unseen but there.

      It takes a village...you know those words... but I am using it in a slightly different context...it takes a village that is willing to make the effort...everyone needs to be committed to understanding and knowing and caring enough. I think that is a crucial element...caring..it takes work to make this kind of change as you know. Thank you 0nce again for bringing this into focus.

      Sending yu many angels today:) ps

    • Mr Archer profile image

      Mr Archer 4 years ago from Missouri

      You are absolutely dead on here, Bill. We must make the effort for the future generations to come. Yet I see less empathy for others now than in years past. It is a daunting task, yet one we must not shy away from. Very pointed work here.

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 4 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      I wonder how this can be. But I do know it is still out there. I am working on a risk management case where a Black lady is suing a Vietnamese shop for discrimination against her due to her color. Strange but her features look quite like Tiger Woods. The worker who allegedly discriminated does not speak English. The lady's exiting words were "why don't all you Asians go back to your country".

      It really is a head scratcher. Oh well, I better go get my Amerasian boy some milk down at the Chaldean grocery store, and drop in and say "hola" to Maria.

    • jainismus profile image

      Mahaveer Sanglikar 4 years ago from Pune, India

      People of different group do not come together because they do not believe in co-existence.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      PS, this is a long battle we have ahead of us. Societal change of this magnitude will happen but it will happen ever so slowly. You are right when you say the "whites only" signs are still around but camouflaged cleverly so as to appear very PC. We are not fooled. This type of myopic thinking needs to come to an end, and it starts in families and the neighborhoods and then communities, but first, as you say, people must be willing to change.

      Thank you for a wonderful comment and for reminding me that there are many good people out there, and they are all doing their part to make things better.

      hugs and blessings, and gratitude for the angels.

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Mike, and I see less empathy as well. I'm going to be mentioning your city in an upcoming hub...in fact, I might write you a note with some questions.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      jainismus, I tend to agree with you, and I think the root cause of it is ignorance and fear. Thank you for that insight.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Eric, you managed to sum it all up perfectly with your last paragraph. This is such a mosaic of cultures, and it is so easy to learn about each other if we are willing. Bless you my multi-cultural friend. :)

    • onegreenparachute profile image

      Carol 4 years ago from Greenwood, B.C., Canada

      I had to have a little 'think' after reading your hub. I thought 'I don't believe there are any black people in our little town' then I remembered ooops...my doctor is black. Then I thought 'I don't believe there are any oriental people in our little town' then I remembered my friend Rubys' grandparents were from Japan. Ruby and my doctor are just people. I forgot.

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      onegreen...I love it! You forgot! If we could get everyone to think they way you do, we could eliminate quite a few problems in society. Well done my friend, and Happy Valentine's Day to you.

    • Kathryn Stratford profile image

      Kathryn 4 years ago from Manchester, Connecticut

      Happy Valentine's Day to you, too, Bill!

      I just ate a mini box of (4) chocolates I bought at the store for myself! Mmmmm! If I could share with my fellow Hubbers, I would. Maybe someday there will be a way to pass things through the internet to someone on the other end!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Kathryn, now that would be a technological advance that I would love to see. Thanks for telling me about those chocolates...now I'm hungry. :)

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 4 years ago from Central Florida

      Bill, it is amazingly ironic you posted this subject today. As I was having my morning coffee on my front porch, my attention was brought to a hawk and a smaller bird that I could not see through the trees, 'talking'. The hawk flew closer to the smaller bird and as he did so, the small bird chose a tree farther away.

      This made me think of prejudice against the various races that encompass the Human Race. I started thinking, "why do we shun interracial marriages? After all, we are all humans". Then I started breaking it down to the animal and bird world. Squirrels mate with squirrels, blue jays with blue jays and so on. Is that why the human race says whites stay with whites, blacks with blacks, Asians with Asians? Hmmm. I couldn't come up with a viable answer. I don't guess we ever will, for that matter.

      To comment further, when we lived in Philly, there were - and still are - those segregated neighborhoods of which you speak. There are the Italians, Polish, Irish, etc. and of course an entire section of every large city called "Chinatown".

      We are a diverse world, yet segregated at the same time. I don't think it will ever change on a global level, but I do see a little more acceptance and sharing of cultures in personal friendships. I guess we have to start somewhere, huh?

    • Lipnancy profile image

      Nancy Yager 4 years ago from Hamburg, New York

      In one of the agencies that I worked at, we were funded for educating about cultural diversity and funding other organizations to do the same. But the real interesting part about "legislating" it on this small scale, the organizations just kept serving to the same people.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Nancy, I'm laughing although there really isn't anything funny about that. What you just wrote is applicable to the education scene too. Those who don't need the information are always the ones showing up at the workshops.

      Thank you and I hope you are well in New York.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sha, to a certain extent I understand the ethnic neighborhoods. People of the same culture and beliefs would obviously want to be with their own. However, I think in following that logical practice it further divides us all. We may be called a melting pot, but we are far from it in practice. :)

      We do have to start somewhere, and that somewhere is in every damn home in this country.

      Thanks my dear! Wait until you see tomorrow's hub. The Bill of old returns tomorrow.

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 4 years ago from Central Florida

      Uh oh. I feel a rampage coming on! Too much sweetness today? (You know I'm just yanking your chain.....)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      No, no rampage....a bit of darkness from the wounded spirit for the wounded spirits. :)

    • xstatic profile image

      Jim Higgins 4 years ago from Eugene, Oregon

      This is an absolutely true Hub! The changes will probably come in time, but will be incremental. Each generation seems to have a little less race-consciousness. I can certainly see it when I think about my parents' generation and mine and then my daughter's.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      xstatic, I see it in my son's generation, and now in the latest generation, a gradual destruction of racial walls. It is a very slow process but I do see positives.

      Thank you Jim!

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      Deb Hirt 4 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Throughout the ages, it has always been some group that is persecuted. Which one is next? The KKK is still active, and for organizations like that to cease, we must have no need for them. In order to do that, we must open our own hearts, and sometimes forget what we were taught. My father was very prejudiced, but my mother was not. My father and I never got along for that reason. Luckily, I had a great mother who taught me the right way.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Deb, you made a great point early on....there has to be no need for them. Unfortunately, there are still those who feel the need to feed off of hate. I hope to see that diminish while I'm still alive. :)

      Thank you as always Deb!

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 4 years ago from England

      Hi billy, I totally agree with you, for equality to work it has to work on every level. I don't know what its like over there, but the one thing I have noticed over here in England is that the majority of black and white people tend to integrate, get along and live in both communities, others however seem to keep to their own and choose to do so. we try to integrate but other nationalities refuse to mix in with us or marry into our families, we have to teach them as much as us to mix, and then it would be wonderful, here's hoping, nell

    • always exploring profile image

      Ruby Jean Fuller 4 years ago from Southern Illinois

      This hit home with me. My grandson Chad recently married a black girl from Jamaica named Hesylen, she is so beautiful and they are so very much in love, the problem, family members who live in the past believing in separation. I don't know where they got this notion. It was not from my mother who taught equality for all. I think it is the times, so much hate against anyone who is different. I too hope this will change during my lifetime. A young black man won on Jeapordy today, i found myself standing and yelling, " Yes, Yes " Thank's for another great hub..

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Hi Nell!

      We are a mixed lot here, and it would be hard to generalize about such a large population. I would say generally that things are better, but there are still large pockets of the population who refuse to integrate and I find that disturbing.

      Thank you my friend!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ruby, it is interesting where that hate and distrust comes from. Bev's daughter is black and as far as the family is concerned she has no color. Still, there are still people who we know who treat her differently, and I think that mirrors parts of the United States very well. I will never understand it.

      Thank you my friend.

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      Rajan Singh Jolly 4 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      A hard hitting hub, Bill. In this time and age, such attitude leaves much to be desired. Thanks for sending a powerful message across.

      Voted up and useful. Sharing.

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      deergha 4 years ago from ...... a place beyond now and beyond here !!!

      Hats off....very positive hub. If only the the feeling of universal brotherhood and humanity in truest of sense can be imbibed from the very childhood we reach the optimum level of One World without diversity may be. Though there will be many factors to influence but a regular awareness in this regard may enhance the effort to great extant i hope. Thank you for this one. Votes all up way and shared as well across the board. God bless

    • DemiT profile image

      DemiT 4 years ago from Greece

      Billybuc, you opened the door to a long dialogue, which goes beyond the the idea of race and culture. I recently read the book 'Ismael' by Daniel Quinn and it is talking a lot about 'how things came to be this way'. It all starts from the fact that we, the human race, see ourselves as the owners of this planet. When people realize that we are a piece of this puzzle, and not the whole puzzle, then we can start making changes. Diversity is there but we refuse to accept it. Our differences and similarities are things that can bring us together and embrace our species. Somehow, people around the globe have been convinced that what it is out there is limited and not for everyone. I disagree and I think that there is an abundance of resources and space and food and shelter. We just need to educate ourselves and avoid being narrow-minded. Deep down we are all one! There should not be boundaries, no countries, no territories...we should live peacefully and in harmony with the planet that is our home.

      I do agree with you billibuc that it will take many years, if and when we decide to see people as people, and not as color/occupation/religious beliefs etc.

      Great hub...!!!

    • Mhatter99 profile image

      Martin Kloess 4 years ago from San Francisco

      Thank you for this. How ironic my mother was a Hitler youth. I enjoyed mingling with a lot of different cultures.

    • Gypsy Rose Lee profile image

      Gypsy Rose Lee 4 years ago from Riga, Latvia

      Voted up and Bill I'm with you all the way. Reading this I was reminded of Paul McCartney's song with the words ebony and ivory live in harmony side by side on the piano keys.... If only people could look at one another as the Lord does - equal in every way. Great video as usual. Passing this on.

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      Devika Primić 4 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      I enjoy meeting people and get along with all people an excellent and thoughtful hub here. It opens our eyes to see others as one.

    • Angelo52 profile image

      Angelo52 4 years ago from Central Florida

      There are more people willing to "tolerate" mixed couples and folks of other ethnic groups now than in the 50's and 60's. However, as can be seen by the emergence of the Tea Party many people still cling to their "I am better than you because I am whiter". Most of it, I think, can be traced to fear of those "others", yet there is nothing to fear because our genetic code shows we all have common ancestors out of central Africa.

      I remember the 60's in Chicago. Ethnic division was the rule of the day. When that didn't keep the "others" out of neighborhoods, whole areas were "red-lined" and the whites abandoned the city for the suburbs.

      Great article and lots of room for thoughts about what "we the people" really want in America.

    • Dexter Yarbrough profile image

      Dexter Yarbrough 4 years ago from United States

      Billybuc! What a great hub. Now, as I read through the comments (excuse me for being presumptive) it appears as though no black's commented. Therefore, I will offer a black man's perspective for why cultural diversity is lacking and, in my opinion, not getting better.

      Many black people feel as though white people play lip service to diversity. Yeah, we may go to the same job sites and we can sit anywhere on the bus and we can use the same toilets. However, there is a reason why black unemployment is truly in the 20 percent range. There is a reason why urban schools are not funded at the same levels as suburban schools. There are reasons why black people fill the prisons (not because we are racially predisposed to committing criminal acts) and there are reasons why black men are constantly made to appear as though we are chain wearing, 40 ounce beer drinking, crack selling, over sexed thugs. The images of black women are equally as bad.

      My point is that until the majority population makes a definitive change in their beliefs AND walk the walk, things won't get better. Sure, we have interracial marriages now. But there were interracial relationships during US slavery. A good friend once told me, "Let your walk be your testimony." We are crawling in this society. Each of us has a burden to bear in this continuing issue in the US.

      I feel that the problem is still prejudice, discrimination and media images. Honestly, some black's do a disservice by acting like buffoons. Which brings up another point. We are judged on a different level. When ONE black person commits a crime, this person represents the entire black race. All one has to do is read the negative comments at the end of the news article. When a white man shoots up a school or movie theatre, he (alone) is considered mentally unstable, troubled, a loner.

      I know with you, Billybuc, I am preaching to the choir. But when white people believe that black people as a whole have moved ahead and that we now live in a "post racial" society, have a black president, blah blah, blah, I shake my head.

      If we really want to know how far we have come in terms of cultural diversity in the US, ask an educated black man in an urban environment three questions:

      1. Do you have any white "friends" that regularly visit you and your family? 2. How did the job interview go? 3. Why did the police stop and harass you for simply walking down the street?

      There are some very ugly racists deeply entrenched in our educational systems, workplaces, religious institutions, criminal justice systems and the media. Until the majority population focuses on stemming this problem, we won't advance at improving cultural diversity. I hate it and I'm sorry, but a lot of black people (and I would suspect Latinos in urban areas) feel this way. We know that we have a problem when it comes to cultural diversity. We need to honestly implement some workable solutions - and that has to start with the majority population.

      I really appreciate your good heart and thoughtfulness, Billybuc!

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      poojasd7 4 years ago from India

      Diminishing the boundaries between two races is kind of utopia when people's minds are clouded by bias, preconceived notions and the past experiences. Forgiving and accepting each other doesn't happen easily. There will always be an element of doubt in the minds of either parties.

      What I feel is there will be unity among two dissimilar ethnic groups when there is a common burning issue which inflicts both and in turn can unite them.

      Very thought-provoking hub,Billy! I enjoyed reading it very much!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Rajan, I'm just stirring the pot so it won't boil. The more we discuss these issues the closer we come to some sort of resolution. Thank you my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      dghbrh, thank you! It begins in every home, teaching brotherhood and acceptance. We have made strides but we have a long way to go.

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      Jim Miller 4 years ago from Wichita Falls, Texas

      Nothing educates against prejudice quite as strongly as growing up with an Archie Bunker. At least, that was true in my case. Harsh, yes. Embarrassing, no doubt. But there was no mistaking the stupidity and underlying ignorance of bigotry. Thankfully today the lessons are coming from more positive messages and reinforcements.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      DemiT, and wise man had me read Ismael last year and it was an eye-opener. I agree with you that we have barely scratched the surface in our understanding of life and the universe. We must be willing to learn and grow as a species.

      Thank you and have a wonderful weekend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Martin, that is truly ironic. Thank you for sharing that.

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Gypsy, in this day and age, considering all of the violence and hate we have seen, it seems to me it is about time we embrace the human race and stop flying and waving flags. I hope we learn soon. Thank you my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      DDE, thank you! If I open some eyes then I have done my job. :)

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Angelo, you and I have experienced many of the same history. Yes, fear and ignorance....if we can make headway in stomping out those two things, we will see great advancement in cultural diversity. Thank you for a great comment.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Dexter, that's the perspective I wanted to hear, because it verifies what I already knew to be true. Racism is alive and well in this country; it's just sneakier now and doesn't wear a white hood. Thank you so much for saying what you just said. I know you are right. I have watched this develop, or not develop if you will, for decades now, and I know in my heart that we are a very long way from seeing the day when true cultural diversity is alive and well in this country.

      Thank you Sir!

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      Mr Archer 4 years ago from Missouri

      Bill, Dexter's comment's were very well put. His statement of "Let your walk be your testimony" was amazing. And he is correct on his points. A wise man, Dexter. As are you, my friend. Your points about this subject are very intuitive, and as you said, you are stirring the pot so it won't boil. Just asking questions about inequalities you've noticed and brought them to light for the rest of us to become more aware of. As I've said of you before, brilliant. Thank you.

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Pooja, you hit the nail on the head my wise young lady. Bias is alive and well in the United States, even against people of your ethnic background. I don't know if it will ever change. I hope so. :) Thank you Pooja!

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jim, I've been there and done that, and I agree completely. I had to go away to college to find out that blacks were not spawned from the devil. :)

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mike, I don't know what else to do. This has to be discussed and brought out in the open. It is a fair exchange of ideas and viewpoints, just like your hub yesterdays about breeding. The more we communicate about ugly subjects the faster they lose their power over us.

      Thank you my friend and have a great weekend.

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      Graham Lee 4 years ago from Lancashire. England.

      Hi Bill. Another fine hub. Here in the UK we have tried for years, my view is that multiculturalism works two ways. We have communities within communities over here, with different religious beliefs, some of whom preach against beliefs other than their own. As well as the country in which they have chosen to live and into which they have been welcomed.

      Graham.

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Graham, your point is an excellent one and we see that here too. We also see cultures that have no desire to become diverse. Not sure what you do about that. :) Thank you and have a great weekend my friend.

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      Vinaya Ghimire 4 years ago from Nepal

      Billy,

      according to latest census of Nepal, 102 languages are spoken by 92 communities.

      I grew up in multilingual and multicultural society.

      I agree with your perception.

      Cheers

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Vinaya, that is remarkable. That many languages in such a small nation. Amazing! Thank you for adding that perspective to the discussion.

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      Aga 4 years ago

      Very interesting, Bill. once again you show your talents here. I enjoyed it.

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Monis, thank you so much! I am not happy with all of my hubs but this one I am.

    • Monis Mas profile image

      Aga 4 years ago

      Aren't we all that way, Bill? The most cruel critics of our work? I think that's OK though. It keeps us on our toes :-)

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Monis, I think many are that way, or at least they should be to the extent that they want to be better at their craft. Anyway, I'm glad you liked this one and thank you again.

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      Jaye Denman 3 years ago from Deep South, USA

      I missed this one the first time out, so am glad I found it as a link on one of your other hubs. Will share so it can be read some more....

      I've been hoping since I was a child that the wounds of racism would heal and that all people would learn to celebrate our commonalities as well as our differences. True, there has been some healing, as well as a certain amount of progress. Unfortunately, far too many people continue to have negative attitudes about other cultures that were once overt but are now (mostly) underground.

      Voted Up++++

      Jaye

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jaye, thank you for that. I happen to agree completely with you. I know some people do not want to admit it, but I think racism is alive and well today. It may not be politically correct to admit it, but I am convinced it is still pervasive in our society.

      bill

    • m abdullah javed profile image

      muhammad abdullah javed 2 years ago

      Its one of the important issue of our times, rather i would say in some places of the world the racial discriminations have gone to drains. Undoubtedly you have suggested reasonable points for the unification of various cultures. I think two important aspects need to be considered. Firstly, its the fear and love of God that binds human being, so one should think of ensuring these values both at individual & collective levels. Secondly there should be deliberate attempts for abidng by the commoness that different cultures have. With regard to values we should come forward for cultural exchange and eradication of inhuman practies as well.

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      m abdullah javed, all great points you have made. We need to come to terms with this and find a solution, or we will all suffer the consequences. Thank you!

    • m abdullah javed profile image

      muhammad abdullah javed 2 years ago

      Absolutely true.

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you again m abdullah javed

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