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Rural India : Land of Lasting Values

Updated on January 11, 2014
Rural India is home to poor but simple and hardworking people.
Rural India is home to poor but simple and hardworking people. | Source

Resilient Culture

It has often been said that India lives in its villages. For the average urbanite of India, who shunts from city to city on work-related business, it's all too easy to miss the true pulse of the land. It's all too easy to miss the simple joys that unity with nature brings.

Even as globalization has irreversibly transformed the face of India's booming cities, it has not managed to push the India of the villages into the mould of capitalism,

The lifestyle that is pursued in the villages of India continues to be the same unchanged one, dating back centuries.

Rural India is a laid back and patient place. People here practice a lifestyle that has hardly changed in hundreds of years. Cows are an important part of the culture of village India.
Rural India is a laid back and patient place. People here practice a lifestyle that has hardly changed in hundreds of years. Cows are an important part of the culture of village India. | Source

Village India : Land of Diversity

Make no mistake. Rural India does not refer to one geographical or cultural sphere. The villages of coastal Kerala, where people earn a living from fishing and cultivating paddy, are radically different from the villages of the northeast, where shifting cultivation of fruits and vegetables is practiced.

The tiny villages of the forest covered Nicobar islands are a world away from the dust swept villages of desert Rajasthan.

The tiny villages on the densely forested islands of the Nicobar group are just a stone's throw away from Sumatra, but over 2000 kilometres from the Indian mainland.
The tiny villages on the densely forested islands of the Nicobar group are just a stone's throw away from Sumatra, but over 2000 kilometres from the Indian mainland. | Source

The Common Factor : Old World Values

What unites rural India against the mindless greed and exploitation of urban India and the rest of the capitalistic world is the fact that people here continue to hold on to the values that have been passed on from generation to generation.

In rural India, people still have time for lengthy conversations filled with laughter and goodwill. People here welcome strangers with a refreshing glass of buttermilk or a steaming hot cup of tea, secure in the belief that the values they hold on to and practice on a daily basis will keep them safe from the ravages of ill will.

Unlike urban India, rural India doesn't push its elders into old-age homes. Elders here are considered a blessing.

Village India respects the environment. It's fields and sacred groves throb with life. This is the land where eEephants and King Cobras alike are revered. People go into the jungle, not to clear-cut large tracts, but rather, to graze cattle and collect firewood and fruits.

Village India is not jaded. It is refreshing.

Here's what life in a village in the arid southern state of Tamil Nadu is like

Real India Vs.Soulless Cities

Indian city-folk like to believe that they are greatly privileged. They believe that, unlike their village counterparts, they have access to the best things that the world has to offer. Is this true?

Probably, if one were to measure things in monetary terms. Indian cities have few power outages because the power generated from coal plants and hydel projects located in remote areas powers them. Indian cities have large-scale retail giants and costly goods from all over the world. Indian cities also have well paved roads and nightclubs.

Indian cities also have pollution and mind-numbing rates of crime. They also have drug peddlers and road accidents. They don't have peace of mind or a whiff of fresh air. They don't have trees or little streams.

City-folk don't know their neighbours. Villagers know every person who enters their village.

Over 70 percent of India's population lives in its villages, and yet, the needs of this vast majority of people are neglected, and their voices ignored. It seems that to the policymakers of the country, only the cities matter.

Vast swathes of agricultural land and forests are grabbed from people in order to establish industries that loot and pollute, and give no benefit to the locals.

There is a definite spiritual war on in India. The belligerents are, on the one hand, cities that have sold their souls to capitalism and selfishness, and on the other, villages that continue to exist in a time warp, but which are a stronghold of all that truly matters to human life and happiness.

Indian cities have access to the best things that the world of commerce has to offer, and yet are filled with unhappiness and dissatisfaction, unlike the India of the villages.
Indian cities have access to the best things that the world of commerce has to offer, and yet are filled with unhappiness and dissatisfaction, unlike the India of the villages. | Source

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    • rohanfelix profile image
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      Rohan Rinaldo Felix 3 years ago from Chennai, India

      Thanks for reading! Yes, it's election season here in India, so an article on that is probably on the way. Thanks for the topic suggestion!

    • Mr. Happy profile image

      Mr. Happy 3 years ago from Toronto, Canada

      Interesting article. Good to learn a few things. : )

      On another order of ideas, You got elections coming up soon - make the best of it.

      Cheers!

    • rohanfelix profile image
      Author

      Rohan Rinaldo Felix 3 years ago from Chennai, India

      And thank you for stopping by to read and coment!

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 3 years ago

      I have never been to India but friends who have say it is a great place to visit. Thanks for the background on the rural areas of this country.

    • rohanfelix profile image
      Author

      Rohan Rinaldo Felix 3 years ago from Chennai, India

      I'm glad this article gave you a different view of India!

    • lambservant profile image

      Lori Colbo 3 years ago from Pacific Northwest

      Very interesting to learn about India in a different way. Mostly we hear such negative, derogatory things.

    • rohanfelix profile image
      Author

      Rohan Rinaldo Felix 3 years ago from Chennai, India

      Thank you! I really try not to be judgmental when I write.

    • Twilight Lawns profile image

      Twilight Lawns 3 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

      Thank you. Anything that reminds me of the country of my birth is most welcome.

      I like you article because it doesn't fall into the usual judgmental traps. You have written clearly, concisely and with some passion.

    • rohanfelix profile image
      Author

      Rohan Rinaldo Felix 3 years ago from Chennai, India

      Thank you very much!

    • pramodgokhale profile image

      pramodgokhale 3 years ago from Pune( India)

      Sir, well written. wish to get more from you.

    • rohanfelix profile image
      Author

      Rohan Rinaldo Felix 3 years ago from Chennai, India

      Most welcome! You are appreciated for stopping by to read :)

    • mackyi profile image

      I.W. McFarlane 3 years ago from Philadelphia

      Thanks for this brief lesson on the lifestyles and culture of India.

    • rohanfelix profile image
      Author

      Rohan Rinaldo Felix 3 years ago from Chennai, India

      Thank you very much FlourishAnyway! India is a vibrant place :)

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      I liked your description here and your vibrant photos.

    • ologsinquito profile image

      ologsinquito 3 years ago from USA

      It would be really nice to live in a culture where people have time for long conversations, and are happy to spend time chatting with one another.