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Strait of Hormuz, the temptation of a candy!

Updated on October 9, 2014

Wouldn't it be a nice ensemble to gather in a family portrait Saudi-Arabia, Iraq, Iran and us (the Americans)? So far to complete the happy family picture, one is missing and it is our anarchic Iran. In spite of all our attempts, trials to destabilize the region, it is still standing on its feet! The photograph that I have in mind is the aerial topography of the Strait of Hormuz. Saudi Arabia our long time booty call with a vivid red lipstick would smile at us, Iraq recently conquered with maestria thanks to our maxima cum laude graduates of the Pentagon would ruminate its rancor nourishing patiently its revenge and, to finish the celebration of this series of trophies, Iran is the last head that escaped taxidermy, that is not hanging on the oval office walls.

The predicament in which the world is, is summed up in the strait of Hormuz with all its repercussions and consequences at stake for the future of dependent economies. Against the unbearable weight forced upon Iran by international sanctions, its government reacted desperately and smartly. Why? Simply because to use the strait of Hormuz as a weapon as well as a trading currency displays the seriousness of the governmental move as for its intentions and its handicap. Intelligent, because 17 million barrels a day of oil transit through the strait. It is the major route uncontrolled by the U.S., the Canal of Panama being the other major axis but carrying the American flag. It goes without saying that who controls the Strait controls the distribution, impacts the pricing towards an inflationary tendency and if embargoed thus disrupts and stresses the international market. The hesitation of the Europeans to pass to action finds there its explanation.

The short (the Nasr), medium (the Nour) and long (the Ghader) range missile testing is a clear maneuver to dissuasion and an explicit message to whom would doubt of the possible outcome. To defend one's policy, at whatever cost, against unjustified measures is where Iran is pushed at, cornered. The choice is not theirs. Few weeks ago, the Chinese facing the uproar and upheaval of its neighbors on the dispute concerning the territoriality of the China sea, used the same tactic for intimidation.

When the U.S. decides mercilessly to impose embargoes, there is no shred of a doubt in its future execution of the plan. The decision of the executive is followed to the letter, no emotions or reasoning process will cross its path. It is time to consider other countries' firmness in their decision, in their self-determination. We can't assume that we are the only ones benefiting of a discretionary power to intervene militarily when it relates to national security! If Iran puts forward the right to defend itself against any aggressor, what is our?

Lurking another country's wealth and strategic strengths is part and parcel of our foreign policy. The child that America still is, can't accept the fact that she can't eat all the candies in the jar that she salivates on. America still needs the matriarchal scolding voice to temper its desires! Anybody?

For a more detailed comprehension of the problem, read "the not so quiet American".

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    • maxoxam41 profile image
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      Deforest 4 years ago from USA

      A new fan, that can't explain why he likes my hub. An idiot because I say the truth?

    • profile image

      Rue 4 years ago

      Max, you're an idiot.

    • maxoxam41 profile image
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      Deforest 5 years ago from USA

      Update : Bill sent to the Iranian parliament to close the strait to the E.U. countries supporting the oil blockage.

    • maxoxam41 profile image
      Author

      Deforest 5 years ago from USA

      Who would really make a move on North Korea which has the nuclear weapon and secondly has an authoritative regime (meaning no margin to be bent or to be corrupted). And who really cares about Palestine, what would be Chinese and Russian interests? None.

      Unfortunately, geopolitically they are the same thing, strategic points.

      The Strait of Hormuz is the gate to the oil, natural gaz reserves of the world? What does Gibraltar offer?

      Who decided to call it international waters? That close to Iranian lands and it is called international waters?

    • darknezz111 profile image

      Daniel Durand 5 years ago from Southern Idaho

      "The UN cannot be the referee since it is an American tool! Who is the main "shareholder"?"

      This just doesn't make any sense. For example, every time action is supported to move against countries like N. Korea, or to do anything in Israel/Palestine, China and Russia (prominent and powerful members of the UN), can and usually do veto the decision.

      The Panama Canal was an American investment, yes. But Panama would never shut it down, as it would dramatically hurt their economy. Besides, the Canal and the Strait of Hormuz aren't the same thing. I feel that you are reaching on this point. When Iran acts to close Hormuz, that would be like Spain trying to close the Strait of Gibraltar- Impossible, arrogant, and not legal, as it harms many countries and only benefits Spain.

      Yes, America has done some awful things, but in this case, I'm afraid Iran is the one with egg on their face. If the whole strait belonged to Iran, it would be called just that- Iranian waters, not International.

    • maxoxam41 profile image
      Author

      Deforest 5 years ago from USA

      When I attack my purpose is to extirpate anyone's essence. Most of the people repeat what they learned on the news.

      What would happen if Panama decides to close its isthmus? Will it be controversial? Yes. Why? Because it is an American strategic point?

      Once again, it belongs to the Iranians! They have the preeminence!

      The UN cannot be the referee since it is an American tool! Who is the main "shareholder"?

    • American View profile image

      American View 5 years ago from Plano, Texas

      Max,

      I did not have a preconceived idea as to who you were. I was disappointed with your first response to me by attacking me. But I am not one do that. I enjoy reading opposite opinions from mine, it helps me understand where people are coming from on issues.

      I do agree they share waters there but again, only 12 miles. If you observe the 12 miles on both sides, there still is a shipping channel in international waters that neither country can claim. That is why they cannot close the straight. As for the US, they are there in international waters. Should they be stupid enough to go within the 12 miles, they should expect to be attacked. Since the strait is important to Saudi Arabia, they can ask the US, or the UN to patrol and make sure the strait remains open for their ships.

      Your welcome for me challenging you. I think it is good when we all challenge each other.

    • maxoxam41 profile image
      Author

      Deforest 5 years ago from USA

      The problem is that the U.S. have no authority on the subject so their "eventual shutdown" reposes on the realm of the impossible!

      You have to acknowledge that as the Gulf of Oman belongs to Oman whereas it shares both Iranian and Oman waters, it is fair to assume that the Strait of Hormuz is Iranian!

      It is a pity that you had preconceived ideas as for who I was! It is nice that you changed your mind! I thank you for challenging me!

    • American View profile image

      American View 5 years ago from Plano, Texas

      Territorial waters, or a territorial sea, as defined by the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, is a belt of coastal waters extending at most 12 nautical miles from the baseline (usually the mean low-water mark) of a coastal state. The territorial sea is regarded as the sovereign territory of the state, although foreign ships (both military and civilian) are allowed innocent passage through it; this sovereignty also extends to the airspace over and seabed below.

      At low tide and at its narrowest point, the strait is 34 miles wide. So even if Iran wanted to keep people out of the 12 miles recognized, they could not legally close the strait. Across from Iran are on the United Arab Emirates, Musandam, and Oman. So in short, Iran can have all the temper tantrums it wants, they cannot legally close the strait any more than the US can.

      On a side note, your stock with me went up. I am impressed you did look it up. I am not use to countering points of view doing so. Bravo, keep it up and look forward to other discussions with you in the future. All I ask is to be civil presenting your side which I believe you will be. I am tired of the ones here on HP that cannot have a discussion, all they do is attack and name call.

    • maxoxam41 profile image
      Author

      Deforest 5 years ago from USA

      Iran allows foreign ships to use its territorial waters in good faith and on the basis of Part III of the United Nations Convention of the Law of the Sea’s maritime transit passage provisions that stipulate that vessels are free to sail through the Strait of Hormuz and similar bodies of water on the basis of speedy and continuous navigation between an open port and the high seas. Although Tehran in custom follows the navigation practices of the Law of the Sea, Tehran is not legally bound by them. Like Washington, Tehran signed this international treaty, but never ratified it.

    • maxoxam41 profile image
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      Deforest 5 years ago from USA

      I never assume people to be less educated than I am, if you have some knowledge on that matter I will be glad that you share them with everybody on this platform! Otherwise, yes, I will hunt for the knowledge!

    • American View profile image

      American View 5 years ago from Plano, Texas

      Perhaps a little research would answer your questions. My earlier answer has a place that would be a good place to start. I do not mean that as a wise ass answer, I just feel if you read up on it yourself you would believe the facts better than if it came from me. You have some good valid questions.

    • maxoxam41 profile image
      Author

      Deforest 5 years ago from USA

      In what way America has the preeminence in those waters, because it subdued Iraq, it possesses Saudi Arabia and the last to resist is Iran!

    • maxoxam41 profile image
      Author

      Deforest 5 years ago from USA

      Whom does this strait belong to? Why does Iran can decide on opening it or not? Whose water do the tankers transit through?

      I guess the law of the sea is at the American advantage! At what point is it fair?

    • American View profile image

      American View 5 years ago from Plano, Texas

      No question that if America wants to impose an embargo on someone they will go ahead and do it. And if Iran wants to impose an embargo by withholding their oil from the market, they are free to do so. But they cannot shut down the strait of Hormuz blocking all shipments of all kinds coming and going into Saudi Arabia. Not to mention Iran would violate the provisions of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.