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The Four State Solution to Peace in the Mid-East

Updated on August 26, 2015

Sunni/Shia Population Today

Sunni is in gray, Shia is in yellow
Sunni is in gray, Shia is in yellow | Source

What is the Four State Solution?

I believe there will never be peace in the middle east until the following takes place:

  1. Iraq and Syria are split into three countries: Sunnistan, Shiastan, and Kurdistan.
  2. Palestine becomes a sovereign nation.

Iraq and Syria are pseudo countries that were created after WWI. The British and the French Sykes Picot Agreement carved up the middle east and defined borders and countries that did not correspond to the ethnic and religious difference of the people. This was done to control, manipulate, and create chaos for the people because of the oil that was discovered in the region.

Palestine was not made a sovereign country, but was given to Israel by the British Balfour Declaration to do with it as they will. The difference is Israel is a Jewish state and Palestine is an Arab Territory. Israel continues to encroach into the Palestinian territory by colonizing the territory. Further, they have restricted Palestinian travel by building walls and gates controlled by the Israeli military. They defend themselves from rocket attacks by using the Iron Dome which is a very sophisticated anti-missile system in which the U.S. helped fund and develop.

Below is the Balfour Declaration. Lord Rothchild was the head of the Jewish Zionist movement in 1917. Lord Balfour was the British Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs in 1917.

The Balfour Declaration
The Balfour Declaration

The Difference Between Sunni, Shia, and Kurds

The Sunni are the majority population in the mid-east, followed by the Shia, and then the Kurds.

The Sunni believe that Muslims should be ruled by a Caliphate. A Caliphate is chosen by someone who has the knowledge and wherewithal to lead a Sunni nation.

The Shia believe that Muslims should be ruled by an Imam, who is a direct descendant of Mohammad. Iran's Supreme Leader is an Imam. Iran's major population are Shia.

The Kurds are mix of both religions and some are even Christians. This is because the Kurds have never had a homeland, but are a more nomadic people. However, they are mainly grouped in the north of Iraq and Syria, and the south of Turkey. They are also sitting on a very oil rich territory that everybody wants.

Iraq

Iraq's majority are Shia, The minority are Sunni. Saddam Hussein was a Sunni, who ruled with an Iron fist in order to control the Shia majority. Currently, there is a Shia President, Haider al-Abadi who was basically installed by the west.

Syria

Syria's majority are Sunni. However, the country is ruled by a Shia, Bashar al-Assad, who is an Alawite which is a branch of Shia. The Shia are the minority population in Syria. The news states that he used Sarin gas on his own people. Even though those people live in Syria, they are Sunni's and he doesn't like them or ISIS because they are Sunni's as well. He has created Sunni refugees that have fled to Jordan and Lebanon.

According to the Guardian News, Vladimir Putin now wants to support Bashar al-Assad's movement. The civil war that started in Syria in 2011 has left more than 240,000 dead.

Camp Bucca

Source

The head of ISIS (The Caliphate)

Abu Bakr al Baghadadi
Abu Bakr al Baghadadi | Source

ISIS

ISIS is not a country, but their goal is to become a country. ISIS was created as a result of the fall of Saddam Hussein and the Ba'ath party.

His high ranking officers were sent to a prison called Camp Bucca. The mistake that was made is that they were all imprisoned collectively and could meet and plot what they were going to do when they were released.

One of the prisoners, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, was to become the leader of ISIS. According to the guards, he could be described as a low profile model prisoner, so he was released early. He then joined Al Queda. After both of the Al Queda leaders were killed, he took over a branch of Al Queda. But there was a parting of the ways and he formed ISIS.

The rest is history as we all know what he is today and what ISIS is doing. The important thing is that he is a Sunni who is known as the Caliphate. His goal is to change the middle east into a Caliphate led country.

Saudi Arabia and Iran

Saudi Arabia's majority are Sunni that have a tacit relationship with ISIS. They have an ongoing relationship with the U.S. where the U.S.sells them weapons and we buy their oil.. Currently, they are attacking Shia positions in Yemen with U.S. supplied F16's aircraft. The Shia in Yemen are called Houthis and have their own branch of their sect. But apparently, the Saudis don't like the Shia Houthis.

Iran's majority are Shia. They are tacitly sending troops to Syria to fight ISIS that is embedded there. The U.S. is trying to strike a deal with Iran to curtail their nuclear enrichment program and at the same time having to deal with Bashar Al Assad who is the Shia Alawite President of Syria and is fighting ISIS and making refugees of the Sunni population in Syria.

Turkey

Recently, Turkey has agreed to basing U.S. aircraft in their country for the purpose of attacking ISIS. However they have used their own military to not only attack ISIS, but also the Kurdish Workers Party (PKK). Apparently they feel threatened by the PKK as well as ISIS. But the PKK is also fighting ISIS. So in one way, Turkey is allied with the PKK, but in another, the PKK is their enemy. This makes for strange bedfellows indeed!

Prognosis

As one can see, this is a very complex dynamic that is taking place. The west seems to think that all they have to do is democratize these people and all will be well. However, the people of the middle east live by a theocracy that has been in existence for well over one thousand years.

In the west, we are free to practice a religion or no religion, if we so choose. We can go to church and pray and quote scripture, but our lives are legally ruled by government laws. In the Muslim world, they pray five times each day. Their day to day lives are ruled by the Koran and the teachings of Mohammad. Extremists interpret the Koran, just like others have interpreted the Bible to justify killings and all types of atrocities.

Currently some of our presidential candidates are taking a very simplistic view of the mid-east and think we can bomb our way out of this or put boots on the ground and have an all out war. but it's not going to work. These people are in their own three-way-civil war and are coming apart at the seams. We as a people need to understand this.

I don't believe the media and the administration have done a good job in explaining these differences of the people. They are identified by their nationalities and not their religious and ethnic difference. They do not pay allegiance to the countries they live in or recognize the borders, but to the form of Islam they practice and believe in. Therefore, they should be identified as Sunni, Shia, and Kurds, not rebels, militia, and insurgents.

When they lose their identity, they become very abstract to the uniformed and much misinformation is propagated. Even if we take out ISIS, this conflict will not end, because these people are not living in their original ethnic and cultural areas. However, due to the natural order of things, refugees are being displaced and slowly returning back to their places of origin.

Oil is a finite resource, once it is gone, there will be a huge paradigm shift as the middle east will no longer attract foreign interests and they will lose their power in the geopolitical scheme of things. But until then, I believe peace will be hard to come by unless the western world recognizes the religious differences and removes the borders separating these people from uniting with their own kind.

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    • peoplepower73 profile image
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      Mike Russo 13 months ago from Placentia California

      Kathleen: Thank you. You made a great point and I will incorporate it in this hub. Thanks for stopping by> You are a great, and accomplished writer and I enjoy reading your articles. Have a great day.

      - Mike

    • Kathleen Cochran profile image

      Kathleen Cochran 13 months ago from Atlanta, Georgia

      Great work here, peoplepower73. Easy to read and understand. You are absolutely right. The countries the Brits established after WWI never meant anything to the people of the Middle East. Desert Storm was basically about that issue. The one point I'd hit a little harder is that ISIS evolved after Bush's Brenner abolished the Iraqi army - a huge mistake on several levels.

    • peoplepower73 profile image
      Author

      Mike Russo 14 months ago from Placentia California

      Hey Jack, thanks for stopping by. Yes but how do you get peace? Something has to give.

    • jackclee lm profile image

      Jack Lee 14 months ago from Yorktown NY

      You are right. You should have stopped after the first 11 words of this hub.

    • peoplepower73 profile image
      Author

      Mike Russo 14 months ago from Placentia California

      I wrote this last year, but I think it is more relevant today than it was a year ago. I think the only way there is going to be any semblance of peace in the mid-east and the western world is for us to pull completely out of the mid-east. Hopefully, then the terrorism will lessen and they can fight their own three-way civil war.

    • peoplepower73 profile image
      Author

      Mike Russo 21 months ago from Placentia California

      Jean: The mid-east is really a "soup sandwich" right now. I just wish the media would explain the difference among the various factions of Islam and how they are in a three way civil war that goes back centuries. These candidates that are running for president, don't seem to have a clue as to what the dynamics of the region are really about. They just want to carpet bomb everybody.

      I think you are right about the Outdated forum. We just have to wait and see what the next big gun event will bring. I think in this forum, it has been discussed ad nausem. Thanks for dropping by.

    • Jean Bakula profile image

      Jean Bakula 22 months ago from New Jersey

      I wish more people would read this hub and understand the differences between all the groups of people you discussed. Many don't realize that a lot of these people were lumped together in a "country" where they had nothing in common. I like your solution.

      And I also wish the U.S. would stop thinking peoples who didn't live in a democracy, want to rush and do it now. I get worried about Christian Evangelicals, because this is a secular country, and if they keep trying to change that, we could become like the Middle East.

      Mike, I think "the Outdated" forum may be slowing down! I think everything plus the 2nd amendment was discussed there.

    • peoplepower73 profile image
      Author

      Mike Russo 23 months ago from Placentia California

      Vdggiechick: Thanks for reading my article. I do believe almost all of congress and the populous do not have a clue as to what is really going on the middle-east. It requires research and analysis to separate the sound bites of the media, on both sides of the political spectrum, from reality Thanks for sharing my articles.

    • profile image

      veggiechick 23 months ago

      Thank you Mr. Russo, I just started to read some of your articles, and I appreciate a simple communication that helps to simplify the very complicated way the Middle East is situated. Although I knew some very basics, I understand way more thanks to you!! I have always thought that our support of Isreal was over the top considering their condemnation of the Palestinians. I also realize it is complicated, but always hope that someone may realize one day (that has the power to communicate to their people in Isreal), that they have not abided by a very vague and powerful agreement that gave them the Jewish state they so needed. As such, they should clearly also realize that after you receive what is needed for your people, you do NOT continue to take advantage of the position you now have, to undermine those who don't have a chance against a US supported Isreal. I do not demonize Isreal, or the Palestinians, however it would really be nice to see borders that realize the needs of both peoples. As a long time Democrat, I have to say that I questioned your comments regarding the nuclear disarmament deal, however concede that there are two sides to everything, and your point is well taken. It would be nice to see those that have little power in the US (a sleeping Congress) to provide needed assistance in putting through needed legislation to assist those in our own country, instead of pandering to those they think may help them in their next election bids. I guess Im off topic, just thinking how much time is spent in choosing sides, instead of making positive changes that other countries would respect, rather than take advantage of. Again, I will continue to read your posts, I even read a couple to my husband! (smile)

    • peoplepower73 profile image
      Author

      Mike Russo 2 years ago from Placentia California

      Brad: They can't agree, just go back in history. Look at the crusades. There are many versions of God through out history and today throughout the world. What it really takes to bring people together is a direct threat to their existence. If we were attacked by aliens from outer space, the people of earth would unite against the attackers. But that's not going to happen, so we attack each other, because of our difference. When they say democratize the mid-east what they are really saying is make it like us, so it won't be different than us. Therefore, it will no longer be a threat to us. Thanks for giving me the forum to express this. I don't know where that came from, because I never really gave it any conscious thought until just now.

    • peoplepower73 profile image
      Author

      Mike Russo 2 years ago from Placentia California

      Larry: Good to hear from you again. I get frustrated just watching newscast and how they present this conflict as rebels, insurgents, militia, etc. And I get even more frustrated hearing these presidential candidates present their very simplistic solutions as to how we are going to bomb our way out of this or put boots on the ground and then stabilize the countries. Stabilize is a code word for democratize. Thanks for your thoughts.

    • bradmasterOCcal profile image

      bradmasterOCcal 2 years ago from Orange County California

      Mike

      It isn't that, I just have a different view point about issues than the average person. I try to look at both sides and then see what they bring to the table. I grew up in Manhattan and I know about diversity from the streets.

      Seriously, if people can't agree on the same God and follow the same rules than how can they ever agree.

    • peoplepower73 profile image
      Author

      Mike Russo 2 years ago from Placentia California

      MizBejabbers: it is very complex because of the asymmetric warfare. If these people wore uniforms and were fighting for landmass, like they did in WWII, it would make things easier to understand. But they are all over the place, because they are ruled by dictators who are in the minority in their own countries. I thought about creating a table that summarizes the whole mess, but I even get confused. But I think I'll try again. Thanks for dropping by and your thoughts.

    • peoplepower73 profile image
      Author

      Mike Russo 2 years ago from Placentia California

      Brad: You are funny, after participating in your forums, I think you like to play the devils advocate.

    • Larry Rankin profile image

      Larry Rankin 2 years ago from Oklahoma

      One of the most intelligent solution ideas I've heard. I think no matter what you do it's a hornet's nest at first, but your idea might actually work in the long run. Just trying to will our beliefs on the Middle East never will.

      Great hub!

    • MizBejabbers profile image

      MizBejabbers 2 years ago

      You're right, it is complicated. In fact yours is the first explanation I've read that makes sense, and I'm not sure that I followed it all the way because my poor little brain starts to read "Tilt" about halfway through. The crux of the matter is that none of them can agree on the interpretation of whose god is the biggest or the most powerful (or, in come cases, the nastiest) and by the time you mix it with the greed of oil in the Middle East, it is a mess. The Western World needs to work on alternative energy solutions and get the heck out of there. One thing most people don't realize about Israel has nothing to do with religion. They are the eyes and ears of the non-Muslim world. Without them we would have very little spy power in the Middle East. At least that's what my ex-spook of a husband says, and he did spend some time there snooping around in his younger days.

    • bradmasterOCcal profile image

      bradmasterOCcal 2 years ago from Orange County California

      Mike

      So, you are saying it is God's fault, as all he has to do is tell them who is right.

      Just joking, but that is the problem with a silent God.

      I will try to find your hub.

    • peoplepower73 profile image
      Author

      Mike Russo 2 years ago from Placentia California

      Hi neighbor: In a sense you are right about God favoring one or the other. Here is the common thread between Jews and Arabs according to scripture.

      We like to think of Arabs and Jews as being very different. But according to religious scripture, their common lineage started with Abraham, who had two sons: Isaac and Ishmael. The Jews believe that Isaac would be the Son of Promise and the Arabs believe Ishmael would be the Son of Promise. Both the Bible and the Koran have similar stories about Abraham almost sacrificing his sons to God to prove his faith in God. However, the difference in the stories is that the Jews believe God said it would be Isaac that would create a great nation called Israel and Arabs believe it would be Ishmael who would lead a great nation called Islam.

      That is from a hub that I wrote about the constant conflict between Israel and Palestine. I suggest that you read that hub. I did a lot of research and analysis. I would put the link in, but it's prohibited by hub pages.

      In any war or conflict, each side takes the position that God or a higher power is on their side and favors their reasons for war. When we invaded Iraq, Bush said he talked to God and God told him it was the right thing to do.

      Your second paragraph supports what I said about economics, poppies are a cash crop for Arabs.

      In your third paragraph, Israel doesn't have any boundaries either, they are colonizing Palestine with their own housing.

      Thanks for your comments.

    • bradmasterOCcal profile image

      bradmasterOCcal 2 years ago from Orange County California

      Mike

      Hi neighbor

      I think that beyond the economic, Israel is different from the Arab countries that surround it. Israel would most likely be peaceful if not attacked by people who want ot exterminate it. It is about Religion and who does God favor.

      Unlike the Arab countries, Israel produces many products and it doesn't rely on Oil money. Ironically, the Arab countries provide the world with more than oil, they also provide drugs. Which ironic because it doesn't agree with their religion.

      As for 40 years in the desert for the Jews, it didn't stop then. Their entire history has been being the target of their neighbors. Israel hasn't much more that the US when it goes on the offensive. While, the Arabs host the terrorists that don't have any boundaries in their Jihad.

      The Muslims don't like Christians or Jews, and while it started a very long time ago, the issues are still present today. They still live under the ancient and primitive Sharia Law.

      So bottom line, unless God intervenes and calls one religion the winner, there will never be a solution for those countries.

      Just a thought.

      The 6 day war wasn't an idea of Israel.

    • peoplepower73 profile image
      Author

      Mike Russo 2 years ago from Placentia California

      lovemychris: As I just told bradmaster, all wars are fought for economic reasons. Israel uses the excuse that God promised them the Palestinian land over 2,000 years ago. I heard Netenyahu once say that he wanted to use "Transport" to move the Palestinians to another country or an island some place. If he could get away with genocide, I think he would do it. But the rest of the world would not stand for it. Israel has its own form of terrorism. They use bulldozers to push down Palestinians houses so they can colonize the territory and make refugees out of the Palestinians. Thanks for your comments.

    • peoplepower73 profile image
      Author

      Mike Russo 2 years ago from Placentia California

      Hey bradmasterOCcal: I live in the OC as well. As a wise man once said, "All wars are fought for economic reasons." These various sects are vying for oil rich land. They use religion as an excuse to kill the people they don't want on the land they want to control and move the people they do want to the that land. I just read in the news that Putin has agreed to support Syrian President Assad who has caused the death of 240,000 people since he started his civil war in 2011. Thanks for your comments.

    • lovemychris profile image

      Yes Dear 2 years ago from Cape Cod, USA

      What? 40 years wandering around? We're talking about present-day. And Israel is supposed to be secular--just like America supposed to be. IF it was really about religion....no Christian could support Israel because of their abortion policy.

      It's not religion...it's something else.

      And whatever it is pays no heed to any standards of decency.

      IF God is Love.....well then, this is the opposite....IF I was religious: I'd wonder just who and what people are paying homage to.

    • bradmasterOCcal profile image

      bradmasterOCcal 2 years ago from Orange County California

      Mike

      You did a lot of work on this hub, but the simple core of the problem is Religion. It is ironic that worshiping a God results in death, and war. If there is one God, most of the people got it wrong.

      The Muslims can't even agree within their own religion. And for a prophet Mohandas didn't see his own death or its consequences.

      The Jews have had it bad. 40 years wandering around the desert looking for the promised land. Then after WWII they couldn't find a place to be their country, and now they have it but there are problems. Once again the problem is religion.

      If you can't convince Democrats and Republicans to share the country, it is even harder to share a God.

    • peoplepower73 profile image
      Author

      Mike Russo 2 years ago from Placentia California

      lovemychris: I agree with you. It is unfair, but that was the master plan by the Zionist movement. In fact so was having a world power provide monetary aid to their movement. It all fits together very neatly into the Israeli Zionist master plan. Thanks for dropping by and your comments.

    • lovemychris profile image

      Yes Dear 2 years ago from Cape Cod, USA

      But you see...by that Balfour letter....Palestine was to be a national home for Jewish people, doing no harm to the people already living there.

      Not a violent take-over, as it became.

      Bombing the hotel...wiping out villages.....They never lived by that agreement, and still refuse to honor international agreements.

      Thereby making it a rogue state. IMO

      So, who should get Palestine? Split it up? Israel wants all of Jerusalem.....it's just so unfair.