ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Those Who Die Unnoticed in the Time of Pandemics.

Updated on April 29, 2020
Beata Stasak profile image

Beata works as a qualified primary school teacher, a councillor for drug and alcohol addiction and a farm caretaker for organic olive grow.

Laila from 'Eichenau'

Five years ago I celebrated my 50th birthday with my sisters in an old apartment on the outskirts of Budapest.
Five years ago I celebrated my 50th birthday with my sisters in an old apartment on the outskirts of Budapest.

My sisters had rented it for the weekend from a relative for the girls to have some fun.

It was a present from my family and I flew excitedly from Australia to see my family and enjoy it.

So after I arrived at my birth place early in May, with the flowers in full bloom at the start of spring with an unusually blue cloudless European sky, we packed the new Skoda that my family proudly showed me and we girls crossed the border into Hungary. Our abandoned husbands waved to us - left to care for our offspring and homes.

Crossing the border from Slovakia to Hungary and seeing the poverty and negligence in the few small villages that we passed on the way to Budapest, was truly unsettling. Somehow Hungary was not able to shake its communist past.

Once in the bustling historical metropolis, we all sighed with relief. It will be different here, the fun can start. It took some time to find the old apartment block among the grey and identical blocks of flats in one of many residential suburbs surrounding the capital.

A reminder of the negligent and sad communist past, the streets we walked through were dirty and full of broken furniture that had been thrown from the windows above.
One broken chair nearly hit us landing close to our feet on the verge of the path and the busy street.

The oak wood split into many pieces and passersby quickly picked it up for heating. It was still cold at night, and with so many homeless people around, nothing was wasted in this strange city. We even met a young man with an axe searching for big pieces of wood to break up.

“What is happening here?” One of my sisters who spoke Hungarian, asked an old lady as she was locking the outside gate to her apartment block behind her.

“Refugees. The police come to find them. If you are hiding them in your flat, you will pay a huge price. You can lose your rental home. We don’t want those terrorists here. They could murder us all in our sleep.” She crossed herself and shuffled to the corner shop.

I looked at my sisters, their faces blank: “We have seen warnings on TV about refugees trying to cross into Germany but the police fight them off at the border and don't let them in. We have not seen any back home.”

We finally opened the many locks on the gate leading to our apartment. And there, on one of the dark staircases leading to our level, I met Laila. I did not know her name back then. She was shivering, tiny in her oversized coat.

Her eyes were big and scared, sad and dark. Her two ponytails were tied with dirty ribbons that had seen better days.

I barely noticed her - hidden behind the sick and tired figures of her parents. They looked like two middle aged professors who had survived a car crash, with many scars and obviously fearing for their lives.
I barely noticed her - hidden behind the sick and tired figures of her parents. They looked like two middle aged professors who had survived a car crash, with many scars and obviously fearing for their lives.

They hid in a dark corner as we passed them, looking like they wished to disappear into that wall.

I rummaged in my pocket for my newly exchanged Hungarian coins and pressed some into the hands of the mother, who shuffled away from me in fear of my hitting her. I noticed a tear rolling down her cheek as my sisters pushed me up the stairs: “Don’t talk to them. They are terrorists. We should report them. The police are hunting them down all over the city.”

“Did you see them? Do they look like terrorists to you?” I looked at them in disbelief.

“They are dirty and they are Muslims. You can not trust them. They come to kill you in your sleep.” My sisters ushered me quickly into our apartment and locked the door.

Then they unpacked their big surprise: “The homemade cherry cake you love so much and lots of champagne to go with it."

The party was ready to begin but my mind was on the family huddling downstairs, in fear of being discovered at any minute.

After resting, my sisters re-applied their make up, refreshing their appearance for our night out in the city, while I checked out the apartment. It was spacious and decorated with mahagony wood, refurbished to look expensive. There were two spare bedrooms that we didn't use. One was locked, but I found the key hanging in the laundry. When I opened it, I realized it was used for storage by the cleaning lady.

I quietly opened the front door, then beckoned to the scared family to come in. They hesitantly shuffled up the stairs. I put my finger on my lips for them to be very quiet.

They moved to the corner of the spare room and I locked the door. I found the uneaten sandwiches packed for our trip and brought them to the room and also the rest of my birthday cake, abandoned among the empty bottles.

Once in the city with the girls, we visited restaurants and danced on the top of the hill where the historic buildings of the previous Ottoman empire stood. My mind, however, was on the family locked in the bedroom. I had left them a basin to wash in and a bucket for a toilet but still, should I have left the door open for them? What if they stole something from my sisters? Then I felt ashamed of that thought.

Even in the middle of the city, many streets were blocked with broken furniture thrown out of the windows.

People lose their rental homes and refuse to move, so they kick them out the hard way. My sisters i were discussing this while I popped into one of the visitor centres to ask what is going on.
People lose their rental homes and refuse to move, so they kick them out the hard way. My sisters i were discussing this while I popped into one of the visitor centres to ask what is going on.

The lady inside advised me in perfect English to concentrate on the main shopping street with 'Guci' and 'Armani' and buy myself a nice present.

One of my religious sisters wanted to visit a church but they were all shut tight. A priest just returning, informed her that they have to protect the decorations inside because the dirty refugees think that the church is their sleeping quarters these days.

“Shouldn’t the church help all in need?” I asked him in my language, because he was originally from across the border.

“No church would help terrorists. Even God would not!”

“How do you know they are terrorists? All I have seen are poor families running from the war in Syria and walking barefoot across Turkey and all southern Europe to protect their children from bombs. Would you not do the same as them, Father?”

“They come from Syria and they are all Muslims!” The priest spat savagely in my face.
My sister apologised to the priest that I had upset him. I refused to talk to her after that.

Our weekend in Budapest was strained after that. The girls went to shopping malls in Budapest as clothes were cheaper there than in their homeland across the border. I stayed in the flat talking to my refugee family and feeding them from our provisions. The home made sausages, they did not touch. It was pork, after all.

Their English was broken and they did not talk much - just repeating that their families are still back home in Syria and they don’t know if they are alive. They took their Laila out because she had stopped receiving her medical treatment once the war came to their city and their hospital was bombed. She has a blood disorder and needs treatment to survive. The father was a historical professor in his ancient city of Allepo. He cried when remembering his civilization as one of the first on this earth - now ruined. Damaged beyond repair. His people too, and no one knows why.

My sisters did not notice the presence of the refugees as they spent both days out shopping. They only remarked that I was eating a lot these days. At one time, they were scared that there was a mouse in the apartment when they heard some noises from the locked room.

I knew that tomorrow we were leaving Budapest. I was taking the bus to Vienna, and going from there to Germany to see my cousin before I went home to Australia. My sisters in law were returning to their village across the border.

On the last day, I went shopping with my sisters and bought clothes for a girl aged 10. Presents for home I replied, when my sisters enquired.

When my sisters went to sleep, we quietly dressed Laila in her new clothes. Her parents hugged her, crying as they disappeared into the night.
When my sisters went to sleep, we quietly dressed Laila in her new clothes. Her parents hugged her, crying as they disappeared into the night.

They knew that I couldn't smuggle them all.

I had an old European passport with my youngest child still mentioned in it. It was the only way.

Once washed and dressed, Laila looked like any Hungarian girl on the street. The next morning, we locked and cleaned the apartment and packed everything back in the car. I told my sisters to wait. I rushed back to unlock Laila from her room and brought her to the car with me.

I told my sisters not to ask anything. It is not their problem. They don't see anything. All they have to do is to give us a lift to the bus station and provide us with some food for the road. Laila sat squashed between me and one of my sisters, who eyed her suspiciously. Laila did not look up once. We were relieved at the end, after we passed the police van in the busy intersection. It was full of refugees. Laila’s parents sat there too, but they did not see us.

The sister who was driving, translated to us from the radio that refugees were packed into trains and headed back to the border.

At the bus station, those displaced families who were lucky enough to have some money left to bribe officials, waited for the bus to Germany. I asked my sisters to buy us tickets, one adult and one child. No one asked anything. I showed both of my passports - Australian and European - to the driver as we hopped on the bus. He informed us that there would be a check at the border, as refugees are not permitted to cross.

Laila was quiet, mostly staring into space or sleeping. She seemed weak and obviously sad. She looked very pale. I was worried in case she got sick. I was not a citizen here and travelling on my own overseas health insurance. I stopped worrying about myself. She had lost her parents but I think that she trusted me. She squeezed my hand from time to time. She knew basic English which helped, as the majority of the older Hungarians on the bus didn't speak it. We sounded English to them. I put on some cartoons for her on the screen in the bus. She watched obediently, sipping the tea that I offered her and biting a little finger food. She vomited a little so I stop feeding her.

We crossed to Vienna without any problem.

Without much delay, we caught another bus to Munich.
Without much delay, we caught another bus to Munich.

Again there was only a passport check by the driver. I had contacted my cousin in Germany to pick us up and was unsure of what to do next.

I had only two days in Munich before returning to Australia. There was no way I could get Laila onto a plane.

We talked long and seriously in her little flat in the Munich suburb of Eichenau, where she lived with her 10 year old son. He told us that Laila should go to school with him but my cousin looked worried. This is Germany. She has to be identified and reported. She could not hide her for long.

The next day, we went to the Refugee centre in Munich. To my delight, the Germans’ dealing with refugees was warm and human. Laila tightly held a teddy bear that a passerby gave to her on hearing that she was a Syrian girl displaced by the war.

We were informed that, as she has no family or relatives, Laila would be put in an orphanage for Syrian refugee children. She would be medically examined first and identified. She has a medical issue with her blood and needs treatment. My cousin squeezed my hand. She would visit her with Jakub every weekend and check on her, she promised.

We had to leave Laila behind. I felt very sad. I hugged her one last time. She stood there - sad, tiny and misplaced, not knowing or understanding what she had done wrong. Why she was treated, with her parents, the way they were treated in Hungary.

The kind lady in the refugee centre brought in a Syrian translator who asked Laila to identify herself and she said: “I am no one. I don’t belong here. I don’t belong anywhere. I don’t deserve to live.”

We looked at each other horrified. The translator sighed in English: “This is what these kids hear when trying to cross borders to reach safety. This is how refugees are treated in today's world. As children of refugees, they understand more than we do and they never forget. But can they ever forgive?”

I took Laila’s hands into mine and I pressed them against my heart: “You have a home now. You are German like my cousin here. You are Leila from Eichenau.”

“Laila from Eichenau,” she repeated after me in English, smiling weakly.

“Come on, Laila from Eichenau. We will make a proper German girl of you here. You will study to become whoever you wish to be.”

“I will become a doctor to help all children who are like me, “ she said in English quietly, waving to me before she disappeared into the orphanage.

When we got back home, there was an announcement on the radio about the Hungarian mistreatment of refugees.

The criminal court was set to decide if the train full of refugees, aimed for the border but instead left locked on a side rail, with hundreds of refugees who suffocated to death, was a case of negligence or planned murder.
The criminal court was set to decide if the train full of refugees, aimed for the border but instead left locked on a side rail, with hundreds of refugees who suffocated to death, was a case of negligence or planned murder.

“Laila’s parents were on that train,” I said to my cousin quietly.

“If not for you, Laila would have been on that train too.”

“I hope that she will thrive there.”

For the past five years, my cousin has visited Laila every weekend. Even taking her home to Eichenau to play with Jakub and helping each other with their homework.

Laila was thriving at school, learning German and English and getting her treatment regularly. Her blood disorder now under control. She did not talk about Syria at all. Only about her parents. She asked if they could come to Germany, but my cousin hadn't the heart to tell her that they are probably dead.

Laila was one of the first cases of a child's death from COVID-19.

 She was in hospital at that time with a weakened immunity.
She was in hospital at that time with a weakened immunity.

She was not identified as one of the German casualties.

She was still a refugee, an unknown girl whose death no one mourned except for me and my cousin and her son Jakub, who loved Laila to help with his homework - she was so much smarter than him.


Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment
    • Beata Stasak profile imageAUTHOR

      Beata Stasak 

      14 months ago from Western Australia

      I truly appreciate your heartfelt response Peggy, unfortunately refugees are burden these days, too many of them and no place for them to go too. I have spent time with many Syrian refugees in Istanbul last summer and brought them gifts from Australia to ease their burden and you feel helpless not able to help them more...

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 

      14 months ago from Houston, Texas

      Oh my gosh! What a heartbreaking story! You can always be proud of what you did to help little Laila, and also what your cousin did to help her. It is so sad that after all of that turmoil, she died of the coronavirus. How can people be so inhumane to other human refugees? What you did to help is exemplary and says much about your character.

    • Beata Stasak profile imageAUTHOR

      Beata Stasak 

      15 months ago from Western Australia

      Thank you my dear Shauna, we all have to use what we have been given to make the world better place, we all do it in our own unique way:) That is the reason we are still here, us humans despite all the harm we cause to each other and our planet Earth. My dear Liz, it is strange paradox that only when we loose everything or we are about to loose everything we realise the true value of humanity, the only tiny thread of the most important thing we possess...it happened after world wars 1 and 2 as my grandparents' own life story made me realise...thank you for being here for me, you give the purpose to my stories...

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 

      15 months ago from Central Florida

      Beata, what you did for Laila tells me what kind of person you are. You put yourself in harm's way to help this little girl have a chance at freedom and living. It's sad that her life was cut short by a deadly disease.

      I love the way you tell your stories. You have a very unique style.

      Stay well, Beata. Your work is not finished.

    • Eurofile profile image

      Liz Westwood 

      15 months ago from UK

      The environment has benefited greatly from lockdown. It would be great to see this continue to some degree post pandemic.

      Strangely during lockdown I am hearing tales of neighbours getting to know each other by helping those in isolation. It would be good to see this community spirit sustained.

    • Beata Stasak profile imageAUTHOR

      Beata Stasak 

      15 months ago from Western Australia

      thank you my dear fellow hubber, you are absolutely right, only knowledge can break the barriers from one human heart to the other. I remember my own Grandmother very religious and wholeheartedly good person refusing to sit next to person of other colour in a bus, a village woman from a very small isolated place she never came to contact with someone looking different to her. It took time to break her barriers but after she did, she looked after the children of our new African neighbours with all the love she could muster. They became her grandkids those little boys, like you said fear is stopping even the best person to reach out and step into unknown. We need to break the walls between different cultures and religions and people not to build them higher and spread even more fear of unknown...

    • CHRIS57 profile image

      CHRIS57 

      15 months ago from Northern Germany

      Beata, the real beast is fear, the really vicius virus is fear.

      People are afraid, animals are afraid of what is unknown. Even the friendliest dog will become aggressive, if someone/something unknown is approaching.

      Corona is a perfect example of how to create fear. Our governments in democratic countries all know of how to play the instrument of fear. Makes it easy to manipulate people.

      Half a year ago we had big discussion in Germany about muslim girls in school to show faces. Today all run around with masks. What a little dose of fear can do.

      To cure from fear, people have to be educated and trained to reflect on what is going on. I have very little hope though, this will happen.

      This is my idealistic view of what to leave behind.

    • Beata Stasak profile imageAUTHOR

      Beata Stasak 

      15 months ago from Western Australia

      My fellow two beautiful hubbers from Germany, my cousin lives in Germany and visiting her I was impressed by the warm welcome and fully open doors to all of your houses to the displaced, misplaced and lost. A truly shiny beacon Germany is in hostile Europe, it truly is. My story is a combination of my observations of life as it is happening around me...lots of things make me truly sad but at the same time even more things around me make me hopeful...Can I ask you something my two kind fellow hubbers: "If we want to build a better society, COVID-19 isn't the only thing we need to get rid of. What do you want to see left behind when lockdown ends?"

    • CHRIS57 profile image

      CHRIS57 

      15 months ago from Northern Germany

      What a sad and heartbreaking story. I feel very sorry for you and little Laila. You showed real humanity and gave comfort and assistance when it was necessary.

      I get around quite a lot on this planet and i learned that ordinary people are all the same, no matter which country. People are friendly, show couriosity for strangers, sometimes people are naive in a positive way, sometimes in tourist areas they are tricky in selling stuff you don´t want and don´t need.

      Some 35 years ago i was in Hungary lecturing. Same thing as i pointed above. What has happened in the meantime? Something must have gone wrong. I always thought that government and people are two different animals. I very much hope this is still true.

    • Eurofile profile image

      Liz Westwood 

      15 months ago from UK

      Thank you for being brave enough to share such a heartbreaking and sad story. I am so sorry for your loss. The treatment of these refugees is a very poor reflection on the rest of humanity. How can we treat others so badly? It is especially sad after all you did to help Laila and given the comparatively low death toll in Germany during the pandemic.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://corp.maven.io/privacy-policy

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
    ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)