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How many here feel the electoral college should be disbanded?

  1. briars2roses profile image61
    briars2rosesposted 5 years ago

    How many here feel the electoral college should be disbanded?

  2. Agantum profile image60
    Agantumposted 5 years ago

    Interesting question briars2roses.  America is not the only country where citizens don't vote for there own president, many others also vote for representatives to do it for them.  Usually these representatives are the same ones that they send to legislate for them.  Of course in many countries, they just vote directly for their own president, but they created their constitutions in more recent years.   It might be quirky, but I am not sure that it makes much difference and I really don't see it changing any time soon.  We have much better communication than when the system was first set up, but it has been much better for a long time and that has not been incentive enough to change anything.

    1. briars2roses profile image61
      briars2rosesposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Interesting.  But was the electoral college itself not set up to be a vote for those who could not vote?  And now with our technology what could stop a person from voting?   
      And our representatives, where they not to vote majority rule?  Do they?

  3. Two Minute Review profile image61
    Two Minute Reviewposted 5 years ago

    Disbanding the electoral college is brought up frequently, but it will involve changing the Constitution, and getting 2/3 of Congress to agree on ANYTHING these days is a long shot at best. But the question was SHOULD, not COULD, so that at least gets discussion going. I think with the electoral college the way it is, only about 10 states even matter; the rest are so hopelessly Democrat or Republican that any candidate of the other party would just be wasting their time campaigning there. It is a boon if you happen to be one of these 10 states; the campaigns will flood you with millions of dollars in ad revenue and signage and the like. All the same, I wonder if abolishing the electoral college might increase voter turnout? After all, what incentive does a Republican voting in California have to make it to the polls? The same with Democrats in Texas. Their vote for president will never matter because those states are so associated with the other party that it may depress the actual turnout...

    1. briars2roses profile image61
      briars2rosesposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Great answer and a lot of food for thought there.  I can't say I ever thought about that way.   I love what you can learn here.

    2. Attikos profile image79
      Attikosposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Congress can't change the US Constitution, it can only propose an amendment (an unlikely prospect, as you say). The States then would have to ratify it, and they will never do that. This one's a nonstarter.

 
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