ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel
  • »
  • Politics and Social Issues»
  • Economy & Government

Facts About Unemployment Rise in Young Minorities in the Unites States.

Updated on May 29, 2017
Source


Unemployment among young minorities has dramatically increased over the years, all over the United States. Unemployment is an unbalance between the demand and supply of working hours. As unemployment continues to increase, many young minorities face poverty and becoming homeless due to work being unavailable.Unemployment among Americans are high in general, however; unemployment rates are higher among young minorities than any other race. Educated African Americans also has difficulty obtaining employment after graduating college.

When expert data analysts calculate unemployment rates, it is not a guaranteed accurate report because statistics doesn’t include those who are in prison. Majority of those incarcerated are minorities. Imagine what the statistics would be if the individuals who are incarcerated were included in the statistics. Statistics does not include the people who gave up looking for work. Workers who moved out of the labor force cause hardships on, spouses, children, and other dependents. People found that when out of the workforce for a long period, their incomes remained low despite of finding a new job (Furman 128). Some people face poverty and depend on welfare, while others individuals turn to crime to survive.

Unemployment among young minorities has been at a historic high with rates not seen since the Great Depression. Changes around the 1950s due to increased minimum wage laws created a differential effect between racial groups, having the worse effect on black males. Epstein suggests data shows numbers are indistinguishable between now and in the 1950s among youth employment (790).


In 2011, the unemployment rate in the summer was eighteen percent among young minorities (Kenney 44). Rates have increased dramatically since 2011. African American youth unemployment rate is estimated at thirty-one percent, which is the highest unemployment rate than any other race. Hispanic youth unemployment rate is at twenty percent while Caucasian and Asian youth are estimated at fifteen percent (Kenney 44). Per statistics imply that half of minorities out of work. If unemployment continues to increase at these rates, the economy will continue to suffer. This issue must be resolved to assure a healthy economy in the future.


Before technology became more advanced, more manufacturing jobs were available creating more job opportunities for young minorities (Furman 128). As technology continued to advance, demand for skilled workers has fallen, causing reduced employment and lower wages.


High unemployment rates causes the economy to decline dramatically. As the minority population continues to increase, the unemployment rates continue to increase as well. The more the economy continues to decline, the harder it would be to recover. By taking measures to control unemployment among young minorities could possibly lead to lower poverty rates, and crime rates, thus decreasing the number of those incarcerated. If solutions were to be implemented, there would be a great possibility unemployment rates among young minorities will decrease, thus, improving the economic recovery.


References


Epstein, Richard A. Contractual Solutions for Employment Law Problems. Harvard
Journal of Law & Public Policy, Vol. 38, Issue 3, Harvard Law School Journals,
Summer2015, p789-802.

Furman, Jason. “The Truth About American Unemployment Foreign Affairs”. Vol. 95 Issue 4,
Foreign Affairs, Jul/Aug2016, p127-138.

Kenney, Nicole. “Economic Snapshot: Youth Unemployment.” Crisis, Vol. 119, Issue 3, Crisis
Publications Inc., July 2012, p44-44.


Should the Government Inplement Solutions to Tackle Unemployment Among Young Minorities?

See results

© 2017 Chernika Lipscomb

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No comments yet.