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The Wedding Ring: A Brief History

Updated on January 3, 2017
Wedding Bands
Wedding Bands | Source

“In marriage there are no manners to keep up, and beneath the wildest accusations no real criticism. Each is familiar with that ancient child in the other who may erupt again. We are not ridiculous to ourselves. We are ageless. That is the luxury of the wedding ring.” ~ Enid Bagnold

"With this ring I thee wed." There is nothing more symbolic during a marriage ceremony than the exchanging of wedding rings between a couple. This meaningful exchange is a sign of unity, commitment and above all else, love.

Prehistoric Ancestors

The wedding ring is one of the oldest nuptial traditions known to man. It is believed that our prehistoric ancestors would tie rushes, twigs and grass around ankles and wrists of the bride. This symbolized friendship and loyalty and was meant to give the bride longevity and protect the soul.


Prehistoric Man
Prehistoric Man | Source

Ancient Egyptians

However, according to historical evidence, the use of a wedding ring actually occurred in Ancient Egypt. During archaeological excavations, artifacts dating back more than 4000 years were discovered indicating the birth of the wedding ring.


Papyrus scrolls show drawings of rings braided from reeds and hemp being exchanged between Egyptian couples. Rings were also made from bone, leather and ivory. Some time later, Egyptians realized that metal could be used to make rings. It was believed that when a woman received a metal ring, she would have claim to all of her husband's possessions.


Archaeologists discovered, by studying hieroglyphics, that the ancient Egyptians believed that the circle was symbolic of perpetual love between a woman and a man. For this reason Egyptians wore their wedding bands on their left hand ring finger believed to have the vein which led directly to the heart. The ring was also symbolic of eternity for Egyptians and other ancient cultures. The circle was representative of time that had no end. The center or hole of the circle was also regarded as a gateway to the known and unknown.

Ancient Egyptian Couple
Ancient Egyptian Couple | Source

Ancient Romans

This belief was adopted by other cultures and passed down throughout the years. In Ancient Roman times, exchanging of rings took on an entirely different meaning. Early Romans believed that the exchange of a ring was more about ownership of a woman rather than that of commitment and love. During this time, marriages were based on social classes and there were primarily three types of unions practiced. They were Confarreatio, Coemptio and Usus.


Confarreatio was a traditional patrician form of marriage. In the beginning, only those whose parents were joined in this type of union were allowed to marry in the same way. The bride went directly from the hand of her father (paterfamilias) to the hand of the groom. The marriage rite of Confarreatio derived from the latin words "panis farreus" which was a cake made of spelt that the couple shared during the ceremony. The ceremony was presided over by the Flamen Dialis and Pontifex Maximus and had to be witnessed by at least 10 people. Confarreatio was reserved for the wealthy and was considered the only legal form of marriage at the time.


In a Coemptio union which was considered a "mutual purchase", a Roman man and woman delivered money to each other for the purpose of joining in marriage. The man would ask the woman if she would be his "Materfamilias" or "Mistress of the Family" and she would likewise ask him if he would be her "Paterfamilias" or "Master of the Family". Historians believe that the exchange of money was more symbolic than anything else. However, a father was paid a sum of money for their daughter's hand in marriage.


The Unus union did not require a wedding ceremony. Essentially, a woman would have the hand or "manus" of her husband after cohabiting with the man for a certain period of time. In today's society, this is known as a Common-law marriage. Often there was intent from the beginning of the relationship or "adfectus maritalis". As a prerequisite, the couple had to live with one another for a minimum of one year. However, if within that year the woman left the home for three consecutive days, the arrangement would become null and void. Primarily, Usus was an informal union reserved for the lowest class of Romans.


Unlike the Egyptians who believed the ring was a symbol of love, historians believe the Romans viewed the wedding band as a symbol of possession. In other words the bride now "belonged" to the groom. Surprisingly, the Romans also placed the band on the fourth finger of the left hand and coined the phrase "Vena Amoris", a Latin term for "vein of love". Difficult to understand when the word "possession" comes into play. Scientific proof has since ruled out this theory.


Over time the Roman betrothal rings were made of iron and called “Anulus Pronubus.” The iron rings were symbolic of strength and perpetuity. This ultimately introduced the use of metals for rings. Wedding rings were worn by women only. Brides were given gold rings by their husbands which were worn in public. While at home they would wear their iron ring. Romans were also considered the first to engrave their rings.


In contrast, as time progressed the wedding ring became more symbolic of romance for the Romans. Much like the Egyptians long before them, the bride now had a right to her husband's possessions. It was also symbolic of the bride possessing the key to the groom's heart. To showcase this belief, a wedding ring was constructed with a key attached to it.

Ancient Roman Wedding
Ancient Roman Wedding | Source
Ancient Roman Key Ring
Ancient Roman Key Ring | Source

Early Christians

By the time 800AD rolled around, Christians were using the exchange of wedding rings as part of their wedding ceremonies. The rings were very ornate and elaborate, however by the 13th century, the church opposed the use of such rings as they were deemed too secular. As a result, a more modest and spiritual ring was introduced for weddings and betrothals. Also, in 13th century England and Ireland, using rings during the wedding ceremony was paramount owing to their spiritual meaning. It was considered so important that if the groom was too poor to buy a ring, he would have to borrow or rent one. In Ireland, it was considered bad luck and illegal if the ring was not made of gold. Over time, this myth was dispelled as mere folklore.


During early Christian wedding ceremonies, the ring was placed on the third finger. The reason for this practice was so that the priest could give the blessing of, ”In the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit”, and then remove the ring and touch the thumb, the index finger, and the middle finger. Once the priest said “Amen”, he would place the ring on the fourth or ring finger, which sealed the union between the bride and groom.


During Colonial times in America, tokens of love and a promise of marriage were slightly different. At this period in time the use of jewelry was considered iniquitous and pompous. Fiancées were not given rings, instead they were given thimbles as a promise of marriage. Once the couple were wed, the thimble was made into a wedding ring.

Groom's Wedding Ring

The only known men to wear a wedding ring was during ancient Egyptian times. However, a small minority of men have worn wedding rings throughout the centuries. The use of the groom wearing a wedding band is a relatively recent practice. As previously discussed, the wedding ring has meant many different things to different cultures over time including possession of the bride. However, during WWII, it became fashionable and acceptable for men to wear a wedding ring. It was a means of remembering their loved one back home. Today, most men wear a wedding band. Nonetheless, there are still some men who choose not to wear a wedding ring even today. For example, Prince William chose not to wear a ring when he married Kate Middleton. On the other hand, his father, Prince Charles, chose to wear a wedding ring when he married Camilla Parker Bowles.

Man With Wedding Band
Man With Wedding Band | Source

Modern Society

In modern times the concept of the wedding band and engagement ring has become a precious tradition. Today, wedding bands are made primarily of yellow gold, white gold and platinum. Many rings contain diamonds and are often custom made to the couple's personal preferences. In recent decades, however, wedding bands have become more personal and unique. There are some couples that choose to add gems, rubies, pearls or coloured diamonds to their rings.

Diamond and Platinum Engagement Ring
Diamond and Platinum Engagement Ring | Source

Interesting Facts

Did You Know?


1) The first recorded account of a diamond engagement ring was in 1477 when King Maximilian I of Germany (1459-1519) proposed to Mary of Burgundy (1457-1482) and offered her a diamond to seal his vow.


2) The smallest betrothal ring on record was given to two year old Princess Mary, daughter of Henry VIII, on the event of her engagement to the infant Dauphin of France, son of King Francis I, in 1518. The tiny gold ring, fitted to her finger, was set with a valuable diamond.


3) Can you believe that a whopping 17 tons of gold are used annually in producing wedding rings in the United States?!?


4) In the Jewish tradition, the ring is placed on the Bride's index finger by the groom. In and around the 13th Century Hebrew tradition was for the bride to wear a ring designed to look like a Jewish Temple rooftop. This symbolised the future of the couple and its roof was inscribed with the Hebrew words for ‘lucky star’. However, the ring was awkward in its size and shape.


5) There are many cultures today that wear the wedding ring on the right hand as opposed to the left. Couples in countries such as Germany, Norway, Russia, Bulgaria, Ukraine, Greece, Poland, Austria, Portugal and Spain wear their ring on the right hand.


6) The intertwining of gold and iron together became symbolic of unity, love and strength for a married couple.


7) In olden times, wedding rings were looked upon as contracts between two families and represented an exchange of valuables and goods during the ceremony.


8) It was customary In Persia, for the bridegroom to give a ring to everyone who attended the ceremony.


9) At Queen Victoria and Prince Albert's wedding, they gave out six dozen rings that were engraved with the queen's profile.


10) The use of "promise rings" dates back to 16th century Europe. These rings were given as a promise of marriage once the groom was able to acquire possessions and money to ultimately support his bride-to-be.


11) In olden times it was believed that a wedding ring had to be perfectly fitted or it would result in a bad future for the marriage. For example, a ring that was too tight was indicative of growing jealousy between the couple. A ring that was too loose could mean a possible separation for the couple at some point in their marriage.


12) During the seventeenth century, the Puritans attempted to eradicate the tradition of the wedding ring. They were unsuccessful in their efforts.


13) Did you know that there was a legend claiming that Joseph and Mary had used a wedding ring that was made of either onyx or amethyst? Various churches in Europe capitalized on this story centuries ago and claimed to have the ring in their possession which they said was capable of performing miracles. As a result, it attracted pilgrimages to their areas which brought in revenue.


14) Did you know that the concept that a man should spend at least a month's salary on an Engagement ring originated from the jeweler De Beers in the 1930s as a marketing ploy to increase sales? By the way, it is now two months salary.


Jewish Wedding Ring
Jewish Wedding Ring | Source

Types Of Wedding Rings Throughout The Centuries

Throughout the centuries, there were certain styles of rings that were quite popular. Here are just a few of those often unusual and valued rings.

The Puzzle Ring

The history of the Puzzle ring is as unusual as the ring’s design, and shrouded in myth, legend and theory. This ring has been and continues to be alluring primarily owing to its mysterious beginnings. A traditional puzzle ring is a type of ring made up of four, six, eight, or twelve interconnected rings.


One story of its origins takes place centuries ago in the Middle East. the puzzle rings were given by Sheiks and Chieftains. It is believed that they were given to a bride to ensure her fidelity. The only ones who knew the solutions to the ring was the husband. If the bride was unfaithful and removed her ring, it would fall apart. This would indicate to the groom that the wife cheated on him because she would not be able to put it back on. This is just one theory mind you.


This elegant ring has made somewhat of a comeback and is made in gold, silver or platinum and can be adorned with diamonds or other precious gemstones. The designs may vary slightly today but the elements remain primarily the same.

Puzzle Ring
Puzzle Ring | Source

The Gimmel Ring

The Gimmel ring was popular in Europe during the 15th to 18th centuries. The word "fede" is an Italian word meaning "trust" and the clasped hands on the gimmel ring was symbolic of trust between the betrothed. This ring was often given as an Engagement ring. Essentially the ring was comprised of two silver or gold bands which were separated and worn by both the man and the woman. Once they were wed, the rings were joined together by a gold or silver smith for the bride to wear.

Gimmel Ring
Gimmel Ring | Source

The Poesy Ring

The Poesy ring has its beginnings in classical times. Shakespeare's plays mention them such as Hamlet Act III, scene 2, "Is this a prologue or the poesy of a ring." This ring had a small love poem inscribed on the exterior or interior of the band. These rings were believed to possess magical powers. It is said that anyone that wore the ring would experience the sentiment of the poem inscribed on the ring.


In England and France during the 16th and 17th centuries silver betrothal rings were given with the poetic inscription. However, on the wedding day it was replaced with a gold inscribed poesy ring.


Historically, the Poesy ring reached its height of popularity during the Renaissance period. They were not only given on the wedding day but they were also given as a gift to a love interest or simply as a token of appreciation.

French Poesy Ring
French Poesy Ring | Source

The Thimble Ring

The Thimble ring was popular during Colonial America. The practice started with the Puritans who believed that jewelry was considered prodigal and dissolute. Essentially, a groom would give his intended a thimble. It was considered a sign of undying love and devotion and above all else it was practical. However, once married many brides were creative and had the top of the thimble removed and made into a ring. Thus was the birth of the thimble ring.

Thimble Ring
Thimble Ring | Source

The Claddagh Ring

The Irish Claddagh ring is one of the most culturally rich and significant pieces of jewelry in history. The meaning, significance and history of the Claddagh ring dates back to over 400 years. The ring was often passed down from mother to daughter. The ring is still used today.


There are hands on the ring holding a heart, the hands mean friendship and togetherness, the heart signifies love and the crown in the claddagh ring stands for loyalty. The Claddagh ring makes an ideal choice for all occasions, wedding rings, birth stone rings, engagement rings, mothers day rings and rings for all occasions. The Claddagh ring is also referred to as faith rings. The Claddagh ring originated from a small fishing village in Ireland called Claddagh.


The way the Claddagh ring is worn also carries a great deal of significance. A person not involved in a relationship or perhaps has no desire to be in a relationship will wear the ring on the right hand with the crown pointing towards the heart. For a person looking for love, the ring is worn on the right hand with the crown pointing away from the heart. Finally, an engaged or married person wears the ring on the left hand with the crown pointing away from the heart.

Claddagh Ring
Claddagh Ring | Source

Asian Rings

Some Asian countries as well as countries in the Far East use pure yellow gold, (22 to 24 carat gold), for their wedding rings. It is thought that the use of pure gold stems from religious beliefs. However, in India pure gold has been associated with beauty and superiority. Also, pure gold lasts longer which is symbolic of a long lasting marriage. Traditionally, the bride receives a great deal of gold because it is believed that she will be happier.

22 Carat Wedding Band
22 Carat Wedding Band | Source

Finally........

Since the beginning of time, wedding rings have meant different things to different cultures and religions. Ultimately it has grown as a symbol of love, devotion, unity, commitment and is meant as an everlasting gesture between two individuals in love. I hope that you have enjoyed this look at the history of the most coveted piece of jewelry in the world, the wedding ring.

A Different Perspective On Why Ring Is Worn On Fourth Finger

QUESTION:

Which ring style from the past do you fancy?

See results

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    • Vinaya Ghimire profile image

      Vinaya Ghimire 3 years ago from Nepal

      Rose,

      Since wedding ring is used in many cultures and countries, I had always wanted to know the origin and history related to wedding rings. You have done a wonderful research for this interesting topic.

      In our culture, it is mandatory that groom put gold ring on bride's finger and vice versa during the engagement and wedding ceremony.

      PS:Thanks for leaving a wonderful feedback on my photography article.

    • rose-the planner profile image
      Author

      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for stopping by Vinaya, I truly appreciate it! Thank you for sharing a bit of your culture with me. Different cultures have different traditions when it comes to matrimony which I think is just wonderful. By the way, you definitely deserved good feedback on your baby photography article. It really was awesome. Take care! -Rose

    • Mhatter99 profile image

      Martin Kloess 3 years ago from San Francisco

      So fascinating I shared it. My wife wears rubies (reminders of my heart)

    • tobusiness profile image

      Jo Alexis-Hagues 3 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

      Hi Rose, brilliant hub...I love the history behind this wonderful symbol, but I didn't realised how far back it went.

      Excellent work as always.

    • W1totalk profile image

      W1totalk 3 years ago

      Great descriptive history of the wedding ring.

    • rose-the planner profile image
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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank yo so much for dropping by Mhatter99 and for your kind words. I truly appreciate it. Take care and have an awesome day! -Rose

    • rose-the planner profile image
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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Hello Jo, it is always such a pleasure when you drop by! It amazes me as well that this ritual has essentially been practiced since the beginning of time in some form or another. Take care and have a wonderful day! -Rose

    • rose-the planner profile image
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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for dropping by W1totalk. I really appreciate it! Take care and have a great day! -Rose

    • Cantuhearmescream profile image

      Cat 3 years ago from New York

      Rose,

      I love it, love it, love it! First, I must say "With this ring I thee wed.", is usually when my tears start flowing at any wedding :D. Second, I love the explanations for the reasoning of the placement of the wedding ring. Thirdly, you have this packed full of so much interesting information, none of which I already knew; I found this absolutely fascinating. I appreciate history as it is, but the history of love, romance, marriage? How awesome. This is absolutely a wonderful hub and I could read a hundred more of these.

      Voted up and others, Pinning, Liking and Sharing too!

      Have a wonderful day!

      Cat

    • rose-the planner profile image
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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      It is always a pleasure when you stop by for a visit Cat. I so appreciate all of your kind words and support! Cat, you are such a beautiful, hopeless romantic. I have to agree that the placing of the ring on the finger during the wedding ceremony is so touching. But, what I find incredibly interesting about the wedding ring is that the concept has been around in some shape or form since the beginning of time. It really is fascinating! Once again, thank you for stopping by. Take care and have an amazingly wonderful day! -Rose

    • Cantuhearmescream profile image

      Cat 3 years ago from New York

      Rose,

      This hub is definitely going to contribute to my conversations offline for the next few days... I love having something interesting to talk about; it makes me feel smart :D

      Yes, I love the history behind the ring and how long it's gone on and just how much the idea, tradition and reasoning has evolved. I wonder what the story will be like a hundred years from now?

    • rose-the planner profile image
      Author

      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Cat you're too funny! By the way you don't need anything to make you look smart, you are already one of the smartest individuals that I have come across in a long time. I wonder also what will become of the wedding ring in the future. Something tells me it will be around for eternity just like the circle of the ring. Take care and I am sending you lots of hugs!!!! -Rose

    • epbooks profile image

      Elizabeth Parker 3 years ago from Las Vegas, NV

      Wow! You did your research. This is very interesting. My two favorites are the Claddaugh and the Gimmel. Very unique looking. This should be in a magazine. Voted up!

    • LisaKoski profile image

      LisaKoski 3 years ago from WA

      It's funny how something so small in size can have such a long history behind it. I never realized how many traditions and rules there were for how to wear them. My dad never wore a wedding ring and I always thought he just never had one. Turns out he only ever wore it to the wedding ceremony. Thanks for sharing! I really appreciate all the research you must have done to put this together.

    • rose-the planner profile image
      Author

      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much epbooks for your kind words and vote up. I really appreciate it! I have to agree that the Claddagh ring and the Gimmel ring are my favoutites also. Take care and have a wonderful evening. -Rose

    • rose-the planner profile image
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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for stopping by Lisa and for your kind words. I really appreciate it. It is hard to believe that the wedding ring ritual has been around for so long. However, it doesn't surprise me that some men, even today, don't like to wear wedding bands. My father was the same, he only wore his ring on special occasions. Take care and have an awesome weekend! -Rose

    • Cantuhearmescream profile image

      Cat 3 years ago from New York

      Rose,

      Aww... I'm so glad I popped back in! You're so sweet; thank you! I'm not returning the compliment... but your hubs are outstand and always FULL of information and you are certainly rocking the hub! If I didn't know any better, I'd think you were a well-seasoned hubber! I bet you're right; I don't think the ring will ever go away... but I bet traditions will change. Tons of hugs right back at ya!

      Cat

    • rose-the planner profile image
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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you Cat. You're a sweetheart! Take care and have a beautiful day!

    • Troyangeluk profile image

      Troyangeluk 3 years ago from UK

      I fount this really interesting and cool, nice work, voted up etc :).

    • rose-the planner profile image
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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for stopping by Troyangeluk. I really appreciate your kind words and vote up. Take care!

      -Rose

    • rajan jolly profile image

      Rajan Singh Jolly 3 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      Interesting read, Rose. Wedding rings are put on the occasion of the engagement of the couple here. Nice reading about the history and facts of the wedding rings and the Gimmel ring appeals to me.

      Voted up and interesting.

    • rose-the planner profile image
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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you for stopping by Rajan, it is always appreciated! Thank you for the vote up. I really love the Wedding traditions from India. I am familiar with the Hindu wedding rituals as I have personally witnessed a few and they are fascinating to me. Take care! -Rose

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      Vickiw 3 years ago

      Beautiful story, meticulous research and lovely photos! What more could any Hub need?! I really enjoyed this, Rose. I guess I am a romantic at heart too.

    • rose-the planner profile image
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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you for stopping by Vicki. I really appreciate your kind words. I am with you, I am also a hopeless romantic! Take care. -Rose

    • justmesuzanne profile image

      justmesuzanne 3 years ago from Texas

      Interesting information and fascinating photos! Voted up, interesting and shared! :)

    • rose-the planner profile image
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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you for stopping by justmesuzanne and thank you for your vote up, I really appreciate it! Take care and have an awesome day! -Rose

    • epigramman profile image

      epigramman 3 years ago

      Oh my oh my - my ravishing Rose and one of my favorite Canadians and a most esteemed colleague. I must make you laugh first of all - that first image of prehistoric man reminds me , seriously, of the people I have to work with on a nightly basis, lol.

      And as I drive to work I often think of you because I have 680 am news on the radio for news, weather and sports.

      You have outdone yourself here my friend with another simply smashing hub presentation of world class standards. Your exhaustive homework and research just takes my breath away every time and I am so glad that you are receiving a loyal fan base for your now legendary work here at the Hub.

      I hope all is well with you these days and here in this cooler week I would say the water is now warmer than the air . One more night and then I am off for the weekend until Monday again.

      Are you still traveling? Godspeed to you if you are and please take special care of yourself. Love and hugs from the three of us at lake erie time ontario - Colin , Little Miss Tiffy and Mister Gabriel at 2:35pm and the two cats are out back laying in the shade.

      I will light up Facebook with your new stunner here on this page and I am sending good energy and karma your way

    • rose-the planner profile image
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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      LOL....you're too funny! Colin, how are you? Thank you so much for stopping by and as always, thank you for your kind words and support. You are so kind and wonderful. I heard it is much cooler back home so it must be a great relief especially for Tiffy and Gabe. It must be nice to be off for the weekend. You have to make sure to enjoy yourself and unwind. Next week is already August so the summer is almost gone. Before you know it the CNE will open its gates and when that happens I know the summer is truly over. So I am sending you, Tiffy, and Gabe lots of hugs and kisses. Have a good evening at work! Take Care and keep in touch! -Rose

    • epigramman profile image

      epigramman 3 years ago

      ......It's funny you say this Rose - great minds really do think alike, I was just going to mention the same thing about the CNE coming up in mid-August and how it always represents nearing the end of our Canadian summer. Yes I am fine and so are the cats - the water is warmer than the air now and will be that way right into early October. Naturally I hope you are health and happy and productive too - how is your course coming along? I sent to you another very famous legendary hubber by the name of NELLIEANNA and I am just about to have my dinner out on the deck and then a nap before work time

      I really do love this hub presentation - you are the best of the best.

      lake erie time 6:00pm and sending lots of hublove your way too from Colin Barry White , lol and Tina Turner's back up singers and dancers - my cats

    • rose-the planner profile image
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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      That's so funny, I guess you're right.......great minds do think alike. I am happy to hear that you and the kitty cats are doing well. Thank you for asking about my course. I am just about done and finishing up the second of two final projects which involved building a website so it has been pretty intense. Thank you for mentioning me to Nellieanna, I am familiar with her great work. It must be lovely to have your dinner on the deck surrounded by the lake. Buon appetite! Once again, thank you for the kind words about my hub. You are one of the most thoughtful people I know. Anyway, take care and I hope you have a great nap before work. I am sure that Tiffy and Gabe will take some catnaps as well. Lots of hugs and kisses Colin, Tiffy and Gabe! -Rose

    • Suzie HQ profile image

      Suzanne Ridgeway 3 years ago from Dublin, Ireland

      Hi Rose,

      What another epic wedding themed article you have penned. I love the history and learning new facts and traditions on the ring types. I have always worn a claddagh, different types over the years as many Irish do. it is lovely to see it in your list as it is so symbolic here and now across the world. I loved all the examples of wedding rings you mentioned and apart from loving the claddagh, I found the thimble really unusual as a style and could see me wearing it. The posy and gimmel are lovely too and could see my other half choosing the puzzle one as he loves solving these types things but probably woud not wear a ring like Prince William. My dad never wears or wore a wedding ring but my two married brothers do, it is interesting how many men do not want to and that's okay in my book.

      Cheers for a great polished piece to add to your increasing collection. You have a great niche going and I am a complete fan of your work. Voted up +++++ shared!

    • rose-the planner profile image
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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      It is always such a pleasure when you stop by Suzie. I truly appreciate your kind words and support, you are amazing! My cousin married a lovely Irish girl and she always wears a beautiful Claddagh ring. It is so true that a lot of men, even today, don't wear a wedding ring. I remember my dad only wore his on special occasions and yet all four of my brothers wear theirs everyday. Take care and have a wonderful weekend. -Rose

    • mr-veg profile image

      mr-veg 3 years ago from Colorado United States

      WOw that's a ton of facts out here that I never knew about.. Happy to see such a beautiful narration from you Rose... Great one... Voted up...

    • rose-the planner profile image
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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Hello Mr. Veg, so nice of you to stop by! I truly appreciate your kind words and vote up. Take care and have a lovely day! -Rose

    • CarlySullens profile image

      CarlySullens 3 years ago from St. Louis, Missouri

      Rose, this is incredible. I learned so much. I always wondered where the tradition began, I had no clue it went all the way back to our prehistoric ancestors. I love all the visuals too.

    • NornsMercy profile image

      Chace 3 years ago from Charlotte, NC

      This is so cool! I never thought to think of where wedding rings come from... I've learned lots from reading this. Awesome! Voted up and across. :)

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      mbuggieh 3 years ago

      Excellent hub...interesting, thorough, well-written...thanks!

    • rose-the planner profile image
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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Carly, thank you so much for stopping by. I sincerely appreciate your kind words and thank you for sharing my article! I too find it incredible that this ritual has been around in some form since the beginning of time. It really is fascinating when you think about it. Take care and have a wonderful evening! -Rose

    • rose-the planner profile image
      Author

      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for your kind words and vote up NornsMercy. I really appreciate it! Take care and have a great evening. -Rose

    • rose-the planner profile image
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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for stopping by mbuggieh. I appreciate your lovely comments. Take care and have a wonderful evening. -Rose

    • epigramman profile image

      epigramman 3 years ago

      My ravishing Rose just checking in with you to say a quick hello from Colin and his cat crew Tiffy and Gabriel and off to bed now for a nap before night shift . Hope all is well with you - the weather seemed fresher today with nice sun and a breeze off the water and yes I am so pleased that you are getting well deserved recognition for your fine work here

      Will post it again when I'm here to my FB page with much honor and pleasure

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      lovedoctor926 3 years ago

      Interesting facts about the wedding ring. A very good and well-written hub. I really like the modern platinum wedding band set. voted up useful and beautiful.

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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      I am always happy to hear from you and the cat crew Colin! I am doing well, thank you for asking. I hope that you are doing well. I was talking to my mother today who lives in Richmond Hill and she said it was cool and raining off and on today. You were luckier in your neck of the woods I think. I hope you have a wonderful nap and that you wake up refreshed for work. Also, you know that I am so grateful for your wonderful support! Take care and keep in touch! Hugs and kisses to you, Tiffy and Gabriel. -Rose

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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for stopping by lovedoctor926. I appreciate your kind words and vote up. Take care and have a great evening. -Rose

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      Ruchira 3 years ago from United States

      Rose, this was an awesome hub. I had always wanted to know about its origin, history.

      Voted up and sharing it across!

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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Ruchira, thank you so much for stopping by. I appreciate your kind words and vote up! Take care. -Rose

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      Susan Haze 3 years ago from Sunny Florida

      This is a fascinating hub. I read through it twice. I thought the history was amazing. The different types of rings was awesome. Up, awesome, beautiful, interesting, and useful.

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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for stopping by KoffeeKlatch Gals. I really appreciate your kind words and vote up. I agree that the history of the wedding ring is fascinating. Take care and have a wonderful day! -Rose

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      Kathryn 3 years ago from Manchester, Connecticut

      Rose,

      I am feeling so much better today, and wanted to check out this hub now. I wanted to read it the other day, but I didn't have the heart to even think about weddings.

      This is a beautiful history lesson of the wedding ring! It looks like you put a lot of research into it, and it was so much fun to read. I didn't know much of this, especially that men have worn rings only in recent years. Fascinating.

      Have a wonderful day, and thanks for sharing this with us.

      Voted up and sharing!

      Thanks again for being so sweet and supportive. I appreciate you a lot.

      ~ Kathryn

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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Kathryn how lovely of you to stop by and for sharing this article. I appreciate your kind words and support. I understand how you feel and that this is the last subject you would care to visit, but I am so happy to hear that you are feeling a little better. It will take time, and it is never easy, but you are such an incredibly wonderful person and I am convinced that your soul mate is out there waiting for you patiently. As I have said before, things really do happen for a reason and I appreciate the fact that you are dealing with this difficult situation with grace, sophistication and intelligence. YOU ARE AMAZING!!!! I am sending you lots of hugs. Take care and have a great evening! -Rose

    • MG Singh profile image

      MG Singh 3 years ago from Singapore

      You have done a lot of research. and produced an informative post. However the wedding ring is basically a part of western culture and was unknown in Islam and Hinduism or even Buddhism. However after the advent of colonialism, the eastern religions also allowed it.

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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Hello MG Singh for stopping by, I really appreciate it. Yes the wedding ring concept has ancient origins, however it was actually popularized in western cultures prior to eastern religions accepting the practice. It really is quite fascinating. Take care and have a wonderful day! -Rose

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      Lucy Jones 3 years ago from Scandinavia

      Interesting hub with lots of well researched info. Thanks for sharing. Voted and shared.

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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for stopping by starbright. I appreciate your kind words and vote up! Take care and have a lovely day! -Rose

    • Au fait profile image

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      A very thorough and interesting article. Appreciate all the hard work you did to research so much information going back such a long way! The photos were great too, in helping to understand what the rings looked like. Voted up and will share with my followers.

    • rose-the planner profile image
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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you for your kind words and vote up Au Fait. I really appreciate it! Take care.. -Rose

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      Devika Primić 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      This is truly amazing on the The Wedding Ring A Brief History, informative and interesting indeed. I fancy the Thimble ring. Great hub makes me wonder of the past weddings

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      vandynegl 3 years ago from Ohio Valley

      Great information and very interesting! These rings are all beautiful and unique!

    • rose-the planner profile image
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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for stopping by DDE, I really appreciate it! I kind of like the thimble ring too. Take care and have a lovely day. -Rose

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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for stopping by vandynegl, I really appreciate it. Have a wonderful day! -Rose

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      Sunny River 3 years ago from A Place Without A Name which resides somewhere between Fantasy and Belief, just north of Reality

      What a great hub! I didn't know a lot of that and it was super interesting. Loved reading this. :)

    • ziyena profile image

      ziyena 3 years ago from Southern Colorado

      Rose ~ Awesome depth of information! Who knew such a common, every-day semblance could bring so much history? ... Z

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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for stopping by Sunny River, I really appreciate it! Take care and have a wonderful day! -Rose

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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for stopping by ziyena, I really appreciate it! Take care and have an awesome day! -Rose

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 3 years ago from sunny Florida

      Rose

      Who knew? I kind of took for granted the wedding ring never really delving too much into the historical side of it. But I am so glad that I came across this as it is so interesting.

      Thank you for sharing. Voted up, pinned, and shared. Have a lovely afternoon. ps

    • Phyllis Doyle profile image

      Phyllis Doyle Burns 3 years ago from High desert of Nevada.

      Rose, this is a very interesting hub. The historical fact and traditions have much more meaning than I knew. My favorite ring is the Claddagh, for not only the attractive appearance, but, the different meanings -- and, of course, because of its Irish origins. Very well-written hub.

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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for stopping by pstraubie48. I really appreciate your kind words and support! It really is fascinating when you think of how long people have been exchanging the wedding ring in some form or another. Take care and have a wonderful weekend. -Rose

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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for stopping by Phyllis, I really appreciate your kind words. I love the Claddagh ring as well. Take care and have a wonderful weekend. -Rose

    • Just Ask Susan profile image

      Susan Zutautas 3 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Very interesting hub! I've always liked the Claddagh ring too. I know a lot people that wear them. I wish we could vote future HOTD's as yours here would get my vote. Great job!

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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you for stopping by Susan. I really appreciate your kind words! I like the Claddagh ring also. Take are and have an awesome day! -Rose

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 3 years ago from England

      Wow! this was so fascinating! and I never realised that I had a Poesy ring! well not the name! this was a great read, thanks! voted up and shared, nell

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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for stopping by Nell Rose. I really appreciate your kind words and vote up. That is so interesting that you have a poesy ring. They are lovely. Take care and have a wonderful evening. -Rose

    • Weldon Jewellers profile image

      Weldon Jewellers 3 years ago from Ireland

      Great hub! An interesting fact about the Claddagh ring is that it was invented by a man called Richard Joyce, who was kidnapped by pirates and taken to North Africa, where he learned goldsmithing. After many years, he earned his freedom and came back to Claddagh, where he started making these rings. Original examples are very rare, the last one we saw sold for over ten thousand euros.

    • rose-the planner profile image
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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for stopping by Weldon Jewellers. I really appreciate it. Wow.......that is a very interesting fact about the beautiful Claddagh ring! It is incredible that the last one sold for 10,000 Euros. My cousin married a lovely Irish girl and she always wears a beautiful Claddagh ring. Thank you for sharing that interesting piece of Irish history with me. Take care and have an awesome day! -Rose

    • DexisView profile image

      Dexi 3 years ago from New England

      Cool hub! The exchanging of rings between lovers has always been the ultimate romantic gesture....including the wedding ring. Interesting fact that I didn't know about the Claddagh ring, Weldon Jewellers. Being Irish, I knew the symbolism of the ring, but did not know how it came to be.

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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for stopping by DexisView, I really appreciate it. The story behind the beautiful Claddagh ring is truly fascinating, indeed. Take care and have an awesome day! -Rose

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      What a well-written and marvelous hub. The photos really added a lot, as I hadn't heard of some of these types of rings. My husband purchased me a very nice diamond ring 18 years ago, but sadly I lost the engagement ring first and then the band. Terrible. Voted up and more, plus sharing.

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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for stopping by FlourishAnyway. I really appreciate your kind words and support! How sad that you lost the rings, I feel so badly for you! I think if it happened to me I would be freaking out like a mad woman, lol! Take care and have a great evening! -Rose

    • Dolores Monet profile image

      Dolores Monet 3 years ago from East Coast, United States

      I should have known that the Egyptians wore wedding rings - didn't they start everything? What an interesting hub! Though I do not like the thimble ring - it looks clumsy like it would get in the way of everything! (Voted up and shared)

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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for stopping by Dolores. I truly appreciate your vote up. It is so true that so much derives from Ancient Egypt. I have to agree with you on the thimble ring, lol! Take care and have an awesome day! -Rose

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      Sheila Brown 3 years ago from Southern Oklahoma

      What an amazing hub! So much interesting and really fascinating information. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this hub. Voting up, interesting and awesome. Also sharing in many places! :)

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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for stopping by sgbrown. I truly appreciate your kind words and support! Take care and have a wonderful weekend. -Rose

    • travmaj profile image

      travmaj 3 years ago from australia

      This hub is totally fascinating, informative and well documented. I had no idea of all the history behind the wedding ring. I enjoyed reading this and learning so much from different cultures. The Claddagh ring is my favourite. Thank you. Voting.

    • rose-the planner profile image
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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for your lovely words and support travmaj, I truly appreciate it! I have to agree with you, the Claddagh ring is also one of my favourites. Take care! -Rose

    • QudsiaP1 profile image

      QudsiaP1 3 years ago

      This was very informative, thank you for sharing.

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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you for stopping by QuadsiaP1, I really appreciate it! Take care and have a great day! -Rose

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Isaac Weithers 3 years ago from The Caribbean

      What a great article on a great subject! We simply take the wedding ring for granted. Thank you for this exceptional report on its origin. Voted Up!

    • rose-the planner profile image
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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you for stopping by MsDora. I really appreciate your kind words and vote up! Take care and have a wonderful day. -Rose

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      Richard Ricky Hale 3 years ago from West Virginia

      Rose, another great article, very detailed information. I truly didn't know that the wedding ring went back that far, amazing. Then, all the different traditions and such, a very fun hub to read. Thanks for sharing, voted up, useful, awesome, interesting, and shared on FB.

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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for stopping by thelyricwriter. I really appreciate your kind words and support! Take care and have a wonderful long weekend. -Rose

    • Savio Dawson profile image

      Savio Koman 3 years ago from Mumbai, India

      Oh my! The wedding ring goes back 4000 years? I would have never known that in my wildest of dreams... Your pics and explanations are amazing! I have not seen too many elaborate hubs as yours! Thanks for sharing!

      P.S. Wait till my wife finds out about the Diamond ring.. :)

    • rose-the planner profile image
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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for stopping by Savio. I really appreciate your kind words and support. By the way, I am sure your wife will definitely want to hear about the diamond ring as it is an interesting topic for most women, lol! Take care and have an awesome day! -Rose

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      Doreen Lucky 3 years ago from St. Paul, minnesota

      I love everything about this hub! Very informative and interesting! You put a lot of effort into this one, and it shows. Great job

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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for stopping by Karmallama. I really appreciate your kind words. Take care and have an awesome day! -Rose

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      rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      Thank you so much for stopping by Karmallama. I really appreciate your kind words. Take care and have an awesome day! -Rose

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