ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

The Affects of Gender... What if I had been a boy?

Updated on May 9, 2015

If I had been a Teenage Boy

Gender greatly affects a person’s life, especially during the emerging adult stage of a person’s life. Emerging adulthood is defined as “as the time from the end of adolescence to the young-adult responsibilities of a stable job, marriage and parenthood” (Munsey). For instance if I had been a teenage boy during the emerging adulthood phase of my life I would have been dating boys instead of boys and I would have been hanging out with male friends instead of female friends this would have meant that I would have been in a different social group.

If I had been a teenage boy my schema would have been different. Schema is defined as “a cognitive system which helps us organize and make sense of information” (Psychology Glossary). Males and Females both have different ways of organizing and linking information in their minds. A male’s mind is a bit like a filing system with each type of information in a different compartment. A female’s mind is more like spaghetti, where all information is linked in one way or another. An example of this is in a male’s mind school, friendships, and emotions all have separate compartments. While in a female’s mind school, friendships, and emotions happen to all be linked together. In this way if I had been a teenage boy I would have viewed things differently I would have been able to separate my friends from my school work and would have been not been as easily distracted by my friend’s opinions.

In some ways certain experiences are universal regardless of gender and I would have been the same person regardless of gender. For example people are shaped by the many different experiences that they have had. Certain experiences may have been slightly different if I had been a different gender, but mostly they would have been the same. An example of this is when I learned discipline from becoming a karate student. My instructor always seemed to be harder on the boys than he was on the girls, but we all learned discipline and respect. If I had been a boy my lessons may have been as harder, but I would have come out with the same set of values all the same.

Judgment is another area that is only partially dependent on gender. Judgment is defined as “the act or process of forming an opinion or making a decision after careful thought: the act of judging something or someone” (merriam-webster). If I had been a teenage boy I would have tended to make judgments that would have been more sympathetic to boys instead of towards girls.

The last area that is very dependent on a person’s sex is called the self-fulfilling prophecy. A self-fulfilling prophecy is defined as “ideas that become reality simply because someone believes them” (Aaronson). One common self-fulfilling prophecy is relation to gender is hobbies. Males are often expected to enjoy sports, video games, and violent movies, so often times they become involved in said hobbies even if they don’t have much of an interest. Females are often expected to enjoy reading, writing, school, animals, and more non-violent activities. In this way if I was a teenage boy I probably would have ended up with hobbies like sports and video games instead of reading, shopping, and writing.

Gender greatly affects how a person develops into the person that they are. Males and Females often tend to drift towards and away from certain occupations because of their gender. Gender influences almost everything to some degree such as: marriage, love, hobbies, one’s mind, and one’s values. Gender however does not change what we experience in live it can only affect how we experience life.

Works Cited

Aaronson, Lauren. "Self-fulfilling Prophecies." Psychology Today: Health, Help, Happiness Find a Therapist. Psychology Today, 1 Mar. 2005. Web. 12 Sept. 2013.

"Judgement." Merriam-Webster. Merriam-Webster, 2013. Web. 12 Sept. 2013.

Munsey, Christopher. "Emerging Adults: The In-between Age." American Psychology Organization. American Psychology Organization, June 2006. Web. 12 Sept. 2013.

"Schema." Psychology Glossary. Alleydog, 2013. Web. 12 Sept. 2013.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No comments yet.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)